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By GREGORY KANE | January 4, 2006
It might have been 2005's most enduring and sobering lesson for journalists and researchers: Beware of Wikipedia. For those of you who are not computer-savvy, Wikipedia is an online encyclopedia that has between 700,000 and 2 million articles and nearly 13 million users. According to a late December story in the Boston Globe, Wikipedia "has become ubiquitous on the Web, in the press, and in the classroom." There's just one problem with Wikipedia ubiquity: The site isn't always accurate.
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TOPIC
By Paul Moore | January 2, 2005
In the final weeks of 2004, I've spent many hours talking with readers who criticized and questioned recent changes and cuts in the Today and Business sections of The Sun. It is a large part of a public editor's responsibility to be a visible source of information and a mediator between readers and the newspaper. Editors at The Sun heard the recent flood of reader feedback loud and clear. They are still assessing what they might do about it. As 2005 begins, they know that readers are, more than ever, examining, complaining, praising and demanding explanations about the priorities and credibility of The Sun and other newspapers.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | September 1, 2004
NEW YORK - Celebrity director Michael Moore, who was hired as a guest columnist by USA Today to write about the Republican National Convention, inspired headlines Monday night even before he had written a word. In so doing, the liberal documentarian made the kind of news the paper would have liked to avoid. During a prime-time speech televised Monday night on all the major networks, Arizona Sen. John S. McCain singled out Moore, referring to him as "a disingenuous filmmaker." Moore is the creator and director of Fahrenheit 9/11, a documentary in which he offers a blistering critique of President Bush's decision to invade Iraq.
NEWS
September 1, 2004
IT WAS A RARE unscripted moment in the otherwise elaborately choreographed Republican convention program, and the thrill was electric. Sen. John McCain, who'd rather not criticize his friend, Democratic challenger John Kerry, directed his fire from the podium instead at filmmaker Michael Moore, whose anti-war polemic Fahrenheit 9/11 has helped Democrats mobilize opposition to President Bush. Lo and behold, Mr. Moore was in the hall. He raised his hand in the shape of an L, for loser, directed either at Mr. McCain or at the hundreds of delegates hissing and booing at him, shouting, "Four more years, four more years."
NEWS
May 4, 2004
NATIONAL Probe finds chaos at Abu Ghraib 10,314.00 NASDAQ -- UP +18.57 1,938.72 S&P -- UP +10.19 1,117.49 SUN INDEX -- UP +1.60 267.65 TODAY ONLINE Q&A ON USA TODAY SCANDAL The Sun's media critic, David Folkenflik, answers readers' questions about the Jack Kelley reporting scandal at USA Today and incidents at other newspapers. www.baltimoresun.com/USAToday THOSE NASTY SNAKEHEADS The Sun's Dennis O'Brien answers readers' questions about the northern snakehead, one of which was caught in a Wheaton lake.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | April 30, 2004
Kenneth A. Paulson, a former newspaper editor, lawyer and free speech advocate, has been picked to lead USA Today in the wake of the worst scandal in the newspaper's nearly 22-year-history. In an interview, USA Today publisher and President Craig Moon said Paulson's appointment as editor would help the newspaper "continue to build the brand online and in print," and that he would mend the newsroom culture to ensure the "accountability" of the newspaper's reporting. Major changes were not needed, Moon said.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2004
A panel of former newspaper editors investigating the newsroom practices of USA Today reported yesterday that a deeply ingrained culture of fear as well as negligent editing and poor communication led the newspaper to ignore signs that its star foreign correspondent fabricated and plagiarized stories for more than a decade. Executive editor Brian Gallagher, the No. 2 editor, said in an e-mail interview yesterday that he would leave his job after aiding the transition to a new editor. By late afternoon, after meeting with publisher Craig Moon, Hal Ritter, the managing editor who oversaw Jack Kelley, also had resigned.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | April 21, 2004
The top editor of USA Today announced her early and immediate retirement yesterday, days before the expected public release of a critical report detailing how the paper's former foreign correspondent Jack Kelley was able to deceive editors and readers in print for years. In an e-mail to USA Today's staffers, Editor Karen Jurgensen, 55, said she regretted not identifying problems with Kelley's reporting earlier. "Like all of us who worked with Jack Kelley, I wish we had caught him far sooner than we did," Jurgensen wrote.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | March 24, 2004
When USA Today editors began last year to investigate an anonymous complaint about an article written by the paper's star foreign correspondent Jack Kelley, they did not expect any problems of substance to surface. Since Kelley's forced resignation in January, however, it has become clear that during the last 12 years, a number of questions were raised about his professionalism that could have triggered their concern. An in-depth inquiry commissioned by USA Today Publisher Craig Moon concluded last week that Kelley fabricated numerous articles, plagiarized dozens of others and developed elaborate schemes to cover his tracks when confronted last fall.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2004
News executives at once applauded and winced yesterday after seeing USA Today's detailed account of the dishonest reporting - including repeated instances of plagiarism and fabrication - by former foreign correspondent Jack Kelley. They applauded, they said, because such honesty is desperately needed to win back the trust of the public. But the scandal undoubtedly will reinforce the mistrust many Americans already feel toward the media, they added. "It's definitely one more troubling scene in a long-running movie," said Sandra Mims Rowe, editor of the Portland Oregonian.
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