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NEWS
April 25, 2011
Battlefield preservation, since it is a part of our history, means nothing, absolutely nothing, to developers of cram-em-in houses and shopping centers ("Modern life assaults Md. Civil War battlefields," April 25). It's all part of the dumbing down and greed prevalent in the USA today. I await the development of Valley Forge with cookie cutter cabins erected by Shamble Brothers. F. Cordell, Lutherville
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2011
Harry Blauvelt had just dropped off his beloved yellow lab, Elvis, at doggy day care Monday and was returning home to Kent Island when his car became disabled on the Bay Bridge. The retired USA Today golf writer, who chronicled the rise of Tiger Woods during a long career in sports journalism, had stepped out of his 2001 Honda Accord when, police said, a 2003 International truck slammed into the vehicle and pushed it into Blauvelt. The 70-year-old Chester resident was flung from the bridge's eastbound span into the water more than 50 feet below.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | April 6, 2011
We're less than a week into the 2011 MLB season, but recent history shows that the undefeated Orioles are in pretty good shape to return to the playoffs at season's end. Meanwhile, the winless Red Sox and Rays are already on the ropes. According to data provided to USA Today by the Elias Sports Bureau, 20 teams have started a season 4-0 since 1995, which was the beginning of the wild-card era. Twelve of those teams -- that's 60 percent -- have made the playoffs. Meanwhile, 25 teams got off to a 0-4 start in that span, and only two -- eight percent -- made it to the postseason: the 1995 Reds and 1999 Diamondbacks.
SPORTS
By Rich Scherr, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2010
Top-ranked Gilman stepped onto the Morgan State turf Friday night intent on taking its next step onto the national stage. Instead, the top-ranked Greyhounds simply couldn't keep stride with consensus national champion Don Bosco Prep and bruising running back Paul Canevari. Canevari, starting his first game on offense after switching from defensive end, mauled the Greyhounds for 321 yards on 22 carries, as the New Jersey-power handed Gilman a humbling 33-6 loss. Only a late touchdown by backup quarterback Max Greene kept Gilman from its first shutout in three years.
SPORTS
By Baltimore Sun staff | January 12, 2010
Here's a look at recent media coverage of the Ravens. • The Indianapolis Star's Bob Kravitz notes the absence of the Indianapolis Colts' name during games at M&T Bank Stadium . His column continues with the difficulties that the Colts will encounter with the Ravens on Saturday night. I mention this because, in a shocking lack of professional courtesy and maturity, the Ravens' stadium operations folks refuse to introduce the Indianapolis Colts on game day at M&T Stadium as "the Indianapolis Colts," and on the scoreboard, use "Indy" rather than "Colts."
NEWS
By MILTON KENT | September 18, 2007
The Miami Northwestern Bulls answered a ton of questions Saturday night in an early-season nationally televised high school football showdown against Southlake Carroll of suburban Dallas. The Bulls, who held on to win a 29-21 thriller, overcame their best receiver suffering a bruised heel, a hostile crowd of more than 31,000 and the hype of a meeting between the country's presumed two best teams to end Carroll's 49-game winning streak. While the game's outcome supposedly answered whatever questions might have existed about who is the nation's No. 1 high school football team, there's still one question left to be answered, and it's a big one. Why, exactly, was this game played in the first place?
NEWS
By Ashlie Baylor and Ashlie Baylor,Sun Reporter | April 1, 2007
Timothy E. Parker lives a puzzled life. But he does it on purpose. In fact, he enjoys making brainteasers for the millions of people who attempt to solve the crossword puzzles he designs for newspapers nationwide, including The Sun and USA Today. And recently, Parker published a book of games and puzzles directed at a new audience -- those seeking to learn more about the Holy Bible. King James Games -- a compilation of more than 200 Bible-based puzzles -- hit stores in February. "It's about 350 pages, and as you solve the puzzle, it teaches you the Bible," says Parker, who is an associate pastor at Tabernacle of Deliverance Christian Center in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,Sun Reporter | March 19, 2007
Charles A. Frainie, a writer and World War II veteran, died of congestive heart failure Saturday at his home in Hixson, Tenn. He was 81. Born and raised in Baltimore County's Rodgers Forge neighborhood, Mr. Frainie graduated from Loyola High School in 1943. He enlisted in the Army Air Forces and served as a tail-gunner on a B-24 bomber. In 1944, his plane was shot down over Germany. He escaped to England with the help of French underground forces, said his son Mike Frainie of Reisterstown.
NEWS
By Nina Sears and Nina Sears,Special to the Sun | February 21, 2007
Naval Academy seniors have taken two of the 20 slots on USA Today's 18th annual All-USA Academic Team. Sean A. Genis and Christopher L. Marsh, both of Western Pennsylvania, were honored for their grades, leadership and extracurricular activities. The contest began with applications from about 600 students nominated by their schools, said program coordinator Tracey Wong Briggs. This is the third year in a row that the Naval Academy has had two students make the list. It is the only school to place more than one student on the list.
NEWS
By ROB HIAASEN and ROB HIAASEN,SUN REPORTER | February 24, 2006
The timing just seemed a bit off - or on. In a news cycle dominated by the U.S. ports security story, an advertising insert in yesterday's USA Today featured positive political and economic stories about the United Arab Emirates, a country very much in the news. The Bush administration is trying to calm a furor over allowing a Middle Eastern company, Dubai Ports World, to take over partial control of six U.S. ports, including Baltimore. Critics of the deal say the Persian Gulf country has been linked to al-Qaida.
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