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FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | January 23, 2013
I was kidding when I said that Lance Armstrong ought to pay me back for wasting time and money on his book "It's Not About the Bike. " But others who have taken offense at Armstrong's years of lies about using performance enhancing drugs have taken the issue a step further. USA Today reports that two readers of Armstrong's book have sued him and his publishers, claiming the book is a fraud based on lies and false advertising. The suit filed in U.S. District Court in California seeks class-action status on behalf of other readers and asks for refunds and other costs.  "Defendants knew or should have known these books were works of fiction," the suit states, according to USA Today.
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SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2013
Orioles manager Buck Showalter isn't happy with some of the possible repercussions from the looming suspension of New York Yankees slugger Alex Rodriguez. Speaking to USA Today, Showalter said he will "guarantee you" that Orioles catcher Matt Wieters will be playing for the Yankees when he becomes a free agent after the 2015 season if Major League Baseball commissioner Bud Selig suspends Rodriguez for at least next season. As USA Today notes, according to the collective bargaining agreement, the portion of a player's salary that he does not collect while suspended also does not count toward his team's payroll and the luxury tax threshold.
NEWS
April 25, 2011
Battlefield preservation, since it is a part of our history, means nothing, absolutely nothing, to developers of cram-em-in houses and shopping centers ("Modern life assaults Md. Civil War battlefields," April 25). It's all part of the dumbing down and greed prevalent in the USA today. I await the development of Valley Forge with cookie cutter cabins erected by Shamble Brothers. F. Cordell, Lutherville
NEWS
By Paul McCardell | May 12, 2012
The weather map was first published in an American newspaper on May 12, 1876, at the International Exposition at Philadelphia, according to the U.S. Weather Bureau. The New York Herald was working with the Weather Bureau, which telegraphed data to make a demonstration map. The weather map didn't begin to appear regularly in a newspaper until May 9, 1879, in the New York Daily Graphic. USA Today first published on Sept. 15, 1982, and revolutionized the weather map with color and more data, causing the newspaper industry to change and update.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | September 1, 2004
NEW YORK - Celebrity director Michael Moore, who was hired as a guest columnist by USA Today to write about the Republican National Convention, inspired headlines Monday night even before he had written a word. In so doing, the liberal documentarian made the kind of news the paper would have liked to avoid. During a prime-time speech televised Monday night on all the major networks, Arizona Sen. John S. McCain singled out Moore, referring to him as "a disingenuous filmmaker." Moore is the creator and director of Fahrenheit 9/11, a documentary in which he offers a blistering critique of President Bush's decision to invade Iraq.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sun Staff | March 14, 2004
On the eve of its biggest annual event, professional wrestling was hit with a blow Friday when a national newspaper raised questions about the role of steroids and painkillers in the lives -- and deaths -- of wrestlers. USA Today reported in an investigation that at least 65 wrestlers among the 1,000 under age 45 who had performed professionally since 1997 had died, including 25 from heart attacks or other coronary problems. It termed that rate "extraordinarily high ... for people that young."
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2004
News executives at once applauded and winced yesterday after seeing USA Today's detailed account of the dishonest reporting - including repeated instances of plagiarism and fabrication - by former foreign correspondent Jack Kelley. They applauded, they said, because such honesty is desperately needed to win back the trust of the public. But the scandal undoubtedly will reinforce the mistrust many Americans already feel toward the media, they added. "It's definitely one more troubling scene in a long-running movie," said Sandra Mims Rowe, editor of the Portland Oregonian.
NEWS
By George F. Will | August 20, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Today's media are not known for their exacting standards of good taste. However, some media are protecting the public from something they consider in poor taste and "too graphic" for public consumption. On Aug. 11, the Washington Post carried a full-page ad placed by Focus on the Family, a religious organization based in Colorado Springs. The ad's purpose was to arouse opposition to partial-birth abortion. In this late-term procedure, the baby is turned so that the legs rather than the head enter the birth canal first.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | January 4, 2006
It might have been 2005's most enduring and sobering lesson for journalists and researchers: Beware of Wikipedia. For those of you who are not computer-savvy, Wikipedia is an online encyclopedia that has between 700,000 and 2 million articles and nearly 13 million users. According to a late December story in the Boston Globe, Wikipedia "has become ubiquitous on the Web, in the press, and in the classroom." There's just one problem with Wikipedia ubiquity: The site isn't always accurate.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | February 29, 2012
Built in part on the premise that even some of the smartest and most savvy news consumers sometimes feel themselves drowning in a sea of information online, the Daily Download aims to be an island of orientation. The online site that debuted last week is part of an important movement among educators and journalists to help citizens find their way online and in social media to the kind of data, context and analysis needed to make informed choices about their lives. The idea is that such sites are crucial to the future of democracy.
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