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NEWS
December 23, 1992
It is easy to understand why the participants of the National Community Development Initiative, which met in Baltimore this week to assess their first year of operation, are fairly ecstatic. On the eve of their conference President-elect Bill Clinton chose a man closely associated with the low-income housing cause to be his secretary of Housing and Urban Development.Whether former San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros can meet the high expectations directed at him remains to be seen. But after more than a decade of complaining about the federal government's diminishing interest in caring for the poor, low-income housing advocates will have the ear of a man who understands their language and concerns.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2012
Edwin P. Post II, a retired federal housing inspector and veteran of two wars, died Oct. 25 of complications from Alzheimer's disease at Sunrise Assisted-Living in Columbia. The former Mays Chapel resident was 89. The son of a Con-Ed lineman and a homemaker, Edwin Price Post II was born and raised on Staten Island, N.Y., where he graduated from McKee High School. He served in the Navy during World War II from 1942 to 1947, where he was a patternmaker. He was recalled to active duty during the Korean War, serving again from 1950 to 1951.
NEWS
November 5, 1993
The decision by federal authorities to approve more heavily subsidized low-income housing in Edgewood flies in the face of Harford County's housing policy and the wishes of surrounding communities.But it does reflect the local need for rent-assistance housing and the desire to keep a mixed townhouse development from going belly up and boarded up. Without the conversion of 209 units to Section 8 rent subsidies, the managers of Meadowood Townhouses said they, and a number of their tenants, would face serious financial difficulties.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | December 18, 1992
WASHINGTON -- A decade ago, he was hailed as the perfect politician for the '80s -- an energetic, young Latino with Harvard credentials, populist appeal and movie-idol looks. His future was never in doubt. He would be mayor, senator, vice president and -- maybe, in time -- president of the United States.But Henry G. Cisneros -- now designated to be secretary of Housing and Urban Development -- has never gotten further in elected office than his four terms as mayor of San Antonio.As it turned out, the rising star of the '80s was sidetracked by what will surely go down in history as the political plague of that decade: An embarrassing, highly publicized extramarital affair.
NEWS
By Jack L. Levin | March 12, 1992
IT HAS BEEN 25 years, a quarter of a liberating century, since President Johnson on Feb. 15, 1967, sent to Congress the Civil Rights Act of 1967, with its special emphasis on ending discrimination in housing by 1969.It did not end in 1969. It has not ended today.According to a recent nationwide study by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) of the home-seeking experiences of blacks and Hispanics, illegal discrimination is still widely practiced throughout the United States.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer JoAnna Daemmrich contributed to this article | December 14, 1995
Baltimore County lawyers and federal housing officials resumed talks yesterday on the controversial plan to shift hundreds of inner-city public housing residents to the suburbs -- despite Tuesday's announcement of an areawide agreement on the issue.The new talks underscored a day of confusion over the issue. City officials say the matter is settled; county officials say it's not.As for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, spokesman Alex Sachs said yesterday's talks were "discussions," not "negotiations.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson | April 22, 1991
Before Mary Malachi goes to work every morning, she forces her husband to drive past a littered, empty plot of land in the 1500 block of Retreat Street in West Baltimore.As her eyes scan the empty lot, she doesn't see the broken glass or paper bags.She sees, instead, her new home.Until six months ago, Mrs. Malachi, 64, had given up her dream of ever owning a house. But in June she will move into a three-bedroom town house to be built on that lot -- a home she bought for $37,000 through a unique partnership between religious groups and government.
BUSINESS
By SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 10, 2002
The Housing and Urban Development Department released a study last week, Discrimination in Metropolitan Housing Markets: Phase I, showing that housing discrimination nationwide against African-Americans and Hispanics seeking to buy a home is down more than 25 percent since 1989. For those seeking to rent a unit, housing discrimination against African-Americans is down 18 percent, but is unchanged for Hispanics. "These results illustrate that we are making efforts but there is still work to be done," said Housing and Urban Development Secretary Mel Martinez.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 26, 1996
WASHINGTON -- If the presidential race were a football game, Henry G. Cisneros, the secretary of housing and urban development, might be accused of trying to run up the score.Although President Clinton appears headed for an easy victory, Cisneros has spent much of the past two months aggressively publicizing the administration's accomplishments and doling out money for urban projects as if his boss were trailing in the polls."In the last month or so, they've been doing a fantastic job in the old-style pork-barrel politics," said Sen. Christopher S. Bond, a Missouri Republican who chairs a subcommittee that oversees the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau | February 6, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Baltimore stands to gain a one-time infusion of $13.5 million in community development funds that President Clinton plans to include in the short-term economic stimulus package he will present to Congress Feb. 17.Mr. Clinton outlined his plans yesterday at a White House gathering of 31 big-city mayors, including Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke, to discuss how the cities could best use a new spurt of public-works money in the package.In putting together what is expected to be a $16 billion program of public spending matched with a $15 billion package of tax incentives to spur private investment, Mr. Clinton told the mayors he would include "a fairly significant increase" in the Community Development Block Grant program.
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