Advertisement
HomeCollectionsUrban Decay
IN THE NEWS

Urban Decay

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Donald P. Hutchinson | November 2, 2000
BEYOND THE POLITICS, the posturing, the hyperbole and the emotion that has accompanied the debate over neighborhood revitalization in Baltimore County, there remains one central question: How can the county halt the spread of urban decline and, in the process, ensure a superior quality of life for all of its citizens in the coming decades? Putting aside for a moment the issue of eminent domain, Baltimore County's proposed specific neighborhood renewal projects in Dundalk, Essex and in the Liberty Road corridor -- and the broader revitalization plans they support -- are well conceived.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Wes Moore | June 10, 2014
While describing the potentially devastating effects of climate change during a recent segment of "The Colbert Report," host Stephen Colbert warned that if climate change continues unabated, much of the planet will turn into an uninhabitable wasteland, just like — wait for it — Baltimore. With abandoned row homes featured in the inset, the serious implication of Mr. Colbert's jest was clear: Baltimore, the epitome of urban decay, is unlivable and unsalvageable. While the segment failed to make me laugh, it did make me think.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Linda Linley and Linda Linley,SUN STAFF | July 14, 2003
Diana Damewood has been seeing a different side of Baltimore, a side that seems worlds away from more familiar locales such as the Inner Harbor or Oriole Park at Camden Yards. By bus and on foot, she has toured some of the city's poorer neighborhoods, places where boarded-up rowhouses dot the cityscape and dealers openly sell drugs. During the past two weeks, Diana, 17, of Lutherville, has spent several days at a youth center for at-risk children in the Midway Barclay neighborhood around Greenmount Avenue and 22nd Street.
NEWS
June 17, 2007
As reported in the June 16-17, 1982, edition of the Howard Sun: About 450 Columbia residents gathered at the Oakland Mills High School last Saturday to discuss Columbia's future and to suggest new goals for the city in the next 15 years. The program, described by one participant as a "modern version of the old town meeting," was sponsored by Columbia Forum '82 as part of the new town's 15th birthday celebration. During his opening remarks, developer James Rouse stated, "We have deep, unmet needs in this society."
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Sun Fashion Editor | September 15, 1996
Barbie bashingA fashion icon like Barbie is bound to suffer some digs and pot shots. Urban Decay, the cosmetics company that produces lip and nail colors in lurid colors with names like Bruise and Mildew, ran an ad campaign with "Burn Barbie Burn" as a slogan.Mattel Inc., the toy maker guardians of Barbie, sought a cease-and-desist order to halt disparagement and trademark infringement of their glamour doll.Urban Decay will pull the ads, which ran in edgy mags like Rolling Stone, Spin, Paper and Detour.
NEWS
June 17, 2007
As reported in the June 16-17, 1982, edition of the Howard Sun: About 450 Columbia residents gathered at the Oakland Mills High School last Saturday to discuss Columbia's future and to suggest new goals for the city in the next 15 years. The program, described by one participant as a "modern version of the old town meeting," was sponsored by Columbia Forum '82 as part of the new town's 15th birthday celebration. During his opening remarks, developer James Rouse stated, "We have deep, unmet needs in this society."
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | September 26, 2001
The former Hecht Co. department store building at Howard and Lexington streets - once a symbol of Baltimore commerce and more recently of urban decay - now stands as a test case for the ambitious revitalization of downtown's west side. The eight-story edifice has reopened as high-ceilinged apartments, the first tangible sign of a broader attempt to repackage the struggling area and, like a big red-tag sale, lure people back. Ultimately, success of the 173-unit Atrium, and to a degree the west-side project, may ride on how many Michel Lettres walk through the door.
NEWS
September 17, 1994
What happens in the District of Columbia often is a mystery to people living outside the capital beltway. But this week's stunning electoral comeback of former mayor Marion S. Barry, who was forced from office after the FBI videotaped him smoking crack cocaine, has people throughout the country shaking their heads in disbelief.Mr. Barry won decisively in a three-way Democratic primary against incumbent Mayor Sharon Pratt Kelly and City Councilman John Ray. Ms. Kelly failed to deliver on the high hopes that swept her into office four years ago. She ran a distant third.
NEWS
By Jack L. Levin | November 17, 1993
THE governor goes out and courts still another big-money man to buy an NFL football team. Hysterical calls flood the sports talk shows. The newspaper runs an article speculating that Baltimore will suffer a nervous breakdown if it doesn't get the ball.Meanwhile, the Maryland Conference of Social Concern has a list that should arouse similar anxiety and attract comparable capital from patriots seeking to improve Baltimore's quality of life and boost its economy. Unfortunately, this list is greeted with yawns instead of yells.
NEWS
By Wes Moore | June 10, 2014
While describing the potentially devastating effects of climate change during a recent segment of "The Colbert Report," host Stephen Colbert warned that if climate change continues unabated, much of the planet will turn into an uninhabitable wasteland, just like — wait for it — Baltimore. With abandoned row homes featured in the inset, the serious implication of Mr. Colbert's jest was clear: Baltimore, the epitome of urban decay, is unlivable and unsalvageable. While the segment failed to make me laugh, it did make me think.
BUSINESS
By LORRAINE MIRABELLA and LORRAINE MIRABELLA,SUN REPORTER | May 5, 2006
Touring Kansas City, Mo.'s Quality Hill neighborhood in the mid-1980s, Richard Baron looked beyond the crumbling and vacant former mansions and hotels built by the city's mid-19th century elite. Though residents with the means to get out had fled decades earlier, the developer envisioned a community that would attract people of all incomes. His company, McCormack Baron Salazar, took on a redevelopment that created more than 300 restored or new apartments, plus condos and new shops. All are housed in red brick buildings with bay windows and wrought iron railings, just minutes from the commercial district.
NEWS
By Linda Linley and Linda Linley,SUN STAFF | July 14, 2003
Diana Damewood has been seeing a different side of Baltimore, a side that seems worlds away from more familiar locales such as the Inner Harbor or Oriole Park at Camden Yards. By bus and on foot, she has toured some of the city's poorer neighborhoods, places where boarded-up rowhouses dot the cityscape and dealers openly sell drugs. During the past two weeks, Diana, 17, of Lutherville, has spent several days at a youth center for at-risk children in the Midway Barclay neighborhood around Greenmount Avenue and 22nd Street.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | September 26, 2001
The former Hecht Co. department store building at Howard and Lexington streets - once a symbol of Baltimore commerce and more recently of urban decay - now stands as a test case for the ambitious revitalization of downtown's west side. The eight-story edifice has reopened as high-ceilinged apartments, the first tangible sign of a broader attempt to repackage the struggling area and, like a big red-tag sale, lure people back. Ultimately, success of the 173-unit Atrium, and to a degree the west-side project, may ride on how many Michel Lettres walk through the door.
NEWS
By Donald P. Hutchinson | November 2, 2000
BEYOND THE POLITICS, the posturing, the hyperbole and the emotion that has accompanied the debate over neighborhood revitalization in Baltimore County, there remains one central question: How can the county halt the spread of urban decline and, in the process, ensure a superior quality of life for all of its citizens in the coming decades? Putting aside for a moment the issue of eminent domain, Baltimore County's proposed specific neighborhood renewal projects in Dundalk, Essex and in the Liberty Road corridor -- and the broader revitalization plans they support -- are well conceived.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and Laurie Willis and John B. O'Donnell and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | August 5, 2000
It is promoted as "the most ambitious project" in city history, the transformation of "a blighted community... into one of Baltimore's most desirable neighborhoods." "Urban pioneers" would buy previously run-down rowhouses along East North Avenue and side streets newly transformed into luxury homes priced around $200,000. Mayor Martin O'Malley has hailed the 190-home, $35 million privately financed project as "exciting." "We're breaking new ground," proclaims Charles T. Jeffries, the 34-year-old developer who sells the idea of Perlman Place with the fervor of a preacher.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | May 6, 1998
Baltimore's officialdom gathered on a blighted block on the city's west side yesterday and celebrated something it usually doesn't brag about: how to better board up a vacant rowhouse.With television cameras rolling, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke drove home a screw to secure a door-sized piece of plywood to the front of 3007 W. North Ave., a three-story brick house that is one of 13 vacant dwellings on the block. Two are occupied.The idea was not to highlight urban decay -- though the mayor acknowledged that the strip of crumbling, Victorian-era structures should be demolished.
FEATURES
By S. M. KHALID | January 6, 1991
Devil's Nightand Other True Tales of Detroit.Ze'ev Chafets.Random House.240 pages. $19.95. Whatever became of Detroit, the once vibrant metropolis, which gave birth to Joe Louis, the automotive industry and the rhythm-and-blues sound of Motown? What happened to the "city of the future"?Many of the answers are contained in Ze'ev Chafets' readable and moving "Devil's Night." It effectively chronicles the urban decay of present-day Detroit, which still struggles to rise from the ashes of the nation's worst race riot of 1967.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | May 6, 1998
Baltimore's officialdom gathered on a blighted block on the city's west side yesterday and celebrated something it usually doesn't brag about: how to better board up a vacant rowhouse.With television cameras rolling, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke drove home a screw to secure a door-sized piece of plywood to the front of 3007 W. North Ave., a three-story brick house that is one of 13 vacant dwellings on the block. Two are occupied.The idea was not to highlight urban decay -- though the mayor acknowledged that the strip of crumbling, Victorian-era structures should be demolished.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Sun Fashion Editor | September 15, 1996
Barbie bashingA fashion icon like Barbie is bound to suffer some digs and pot shots. Urban Decay, the cosmetics company that produces lip and nail colors in lurid colors with names like Bruise and Mildew, ran an ad campaign with "Burn Barbie Burn" as a slogan.Mattel Inc., the toy maker guardians of Barbie, sought a cease-and-desist order to halt disparagement and trademark infringement of their glamour doll.Urban Decay will pull the ads, which ran in edgy mags like Rolling Stone, Spin, Paper and Detour.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 1, 1996
WASHINGTON - On any given day here in the capital of the richest nation in the world, nearly a third of the 16 water-pumping firetrucks are kept out of service to save money. Police officers dip into their own pockets to buy tires and put gasoline in squad cars. City clinics periodically stop testing for the AIDS virus because they cannot afford supplies. Local officials are dumping extra chlorine in drinking water to battle elevated levels of bacteria caused by eroding pipes.The Washington of glittering monuments, world-class museums and graceful, leafy neighborhoods continues to captivate tourists, hordes of them.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.