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By TOM HORTON | November 5, 1994
First, a clarification: Because of editorial changes in last week's column, readers may have inferred that I think Ellen Sauerbrey, the Republican candidate for governor, agrees with nearly all the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's recommended positions on the environment.The column should have advised voters to take her claim to that effect with a dose of salt. For 16 years, Mrs. Sauerbrey has consistently opposed issues supported by the foundation and other environmentalists, ranging from clean air and strip mining to recycling, endangered species and forest protection.
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NEWS
By TIMOTHY B. WHEELER and TIMOTHY B. WHEELER,SUN REPORTER | May 6, 2006
BOWIE -- Joseph Mills just wants to keep doing what his family has been doing on the outskirts of this town for 30-some years - raise a few cattle on the hilly 10-acre plot his aging parents entrusted to him. Oasis Farms, they call it. It has been anything but that the past six months. The stream that used to meander through Mills' pasture has gone dry, apparently an unforeseen result of runoff control measures taken by a developer building an 1,800-home planned community on three sides of his property.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | May 16, 1991
The Army is helping thousands of migratory fish reproduce.Officials at Fort George G. Meade unveiled a "fish ladder" yesterday that will allow ocean-going fish to swim upstream to their traditional spawning grounds for the first time in 50 years.For five decades, schools of blueback herring, hickory shad and alewife have been thwarted by a dam, which the U.S. Army built across the Little Patuxent River to supply the Odenton base with water.Army contractors built a specially engineered metal and concrete staircase this spring to help the fish cross the dam and continue their 2,000-mile journey from the Atlantic Ocean to the river's upper reaches.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2000
The need for a bypass dominated a meeting last night of Manchester town officials and Carroll County commissioners. The wide-ranging session also included discussion of economic development, water and sewer resources, and neighborhood revitalization. "We're a little community up here swimming upstream," said Councilman Joe Jordan. "We've got growth to the north in another state altogether. We can't do much about that, I feel like I spend a lot of time in a reactive mode." "We've all been hoping for a long time for a bypass on Main Street," said Steven C. Horn, county planning director.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2003
From the tiny viewing room at the top of Conowingo hydroelectric dam's fish elevator, Dick Williams ticked off a status report on the American shad in the Susquehanna River. It sounded promising as Williams clicked a metal counter in his hand each time one of the silvery, torpedo-shaped fish floated by. "Your eyes do bug-eye," said the Lancaster, Pa., retiree, who is working part time this spring to help count the elevator's catch. "You blink, and you might miss two fish." Small numbers?
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 3, 2001
BOCA CHICA BEACH, Texas - Until a few months ago, the Rio Grande gushed into the Gulf of Mexico here, but now the river's mouth is parched - instead of a ribbon of blue, a 500-foot sandbar marks the U.S.-Mexico border. That and a small sign, some strategically placed driftwood and a piece of drooping orange fence. An eight-year drought and voracious invaders - hundreds of thousands of thirsty migrants to booming border towns and exotic, water-hungry weeds - have consumed the great river's flow and helped bring it to this pathetic end after a journey of 1,900 miles from the Colorado mountains.
NEWS
By Marlene A. Condon | August 21, 2014
Some years ago, a colleague told me how, when he was a boy, he would vacation each summer with his parents in Ocean City . He and his mom always looked forward to crossing the Chesapeake Bay Bridge in Annapolis, where the sea breezes carried the very essence of this estuary - the smells associated with the vast array of organisms that live and die along the shoreline or in the saltwater. But by the 1980s, Rick noticed that the air surrounding the bridge no longer brought to mind visions of the beach with its myriad periwinkles, sea stars, crabs, shorebirds and seaweed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2011
Liz Phair is a sellout. And a copycat, and a Sheryl Crow and an Avril Lavigne, but most of all, a former hero. So says the naggy, invisible Greek chorus of former and current fans, purists, naysayers, and kneejerk critics who greet every record she's put out since "Exile in Guyville," her seminal 1993 album. The reaction was just as strong when she released "Funstyle" last year, an album that — after she described it as "experimental" — was practically begging to be torn to shreds by critics.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | March 22, 1998
Think fishing in Central and Eastern Maryland, and Chesapeake Bay rockfish or river and impoundment bass probably come to mind first. But the state also has a burgeoning freshwater trout fishery that is attracting thousands of anglers of all ages."
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