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By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | March 8, 1999
Dennis and Margaret Caughy's picturesque suburban rancher sits so close to the banks of Plumtree Branch they must cross a wooden footbridge to get to their parking pad along Brookmede Road in Ellicott City.Set among the large lawns and well-kept homes of Valley Mede, a U.S. 40 development west of Chatham Mall built more than 30 years ago, the Caughys' house is in a flood plain.The young couple was pleasantly surprised last year when, as they contemplated a move to Texas, Howard County officials approached them with an offer to buy their house under a state/local program that removes dwellings from flood plains.
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NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | October 27, 2002
What sold Clarence Carvell on his land in southern Howard County was the pretty little pond. Now it looks ugly and dead. The fish are no more, the herons flew away and the water is muddy brown, clogged by sediment carried by the stream that feeds it. "It just keeps getting worse," the Fulton resident said. To Carvell, it is obvious that the subdivision upstream is the source of the sediment that ruined his homestead. As he is finding, however, it is usually difficult for aggrieved homeowners to prove that someone else should be held accountable for runoff damage to their land.
NEWS
By Maria Antonieta Uribe and Sam Enriquez and Maria Antonieta Uribe and Sam Enriquez,Los Angeles Times | November 4, 2007
VILLAHERMOSA, Mexico -- The newly homeless men and women of this flooded capital patiently line up to appear on a local TV station that has been broadcasting their messages day and night. They speak quickly, mindful of others waiting. They say they're at a shelter and are OK. Some hold up handwritten signs with cell phone numbers and beg relatives to call. One woman, eight months pregnant, asks viewers for any information about her missing parents. They know it's a long shot. Few buildings have power for TVs. But hope is all that remains for many of the estimated 1 million residents driven from their homes by flooding that still covers more than three-quarters of the Gulf state of Tabasco.
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | July 3, 1994
DICKERSON -- By late afternoon, as heavy cloud cover moved eastward over the area and broke up the heat of the day, fish were dimpling the surface out in the pool of the river backed up by the sandbars and riffles above the Route 28 bridge.By early evening, baitfish were jumping in the shallows, pursued by smallmouth bass ready to feed again in the shoreline shadows of this section of the Monocacy.Earlier, the day had been pretty much a bust, with light spinning tackle and spinners and grubs catching only a handful of fat sunfish from the edges of patches of submerged grasses and two 8-inch smallmouth bass from behind rocks that broke the flow of the river.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,hanah.cho@baltsun.com | January 15, 2009
Constellation Energy Group repaid a $1 billion emergency loan this week, plus $5 million in interest, to Warren Buffett's MidAmerican Energy Holdings Co., according to documents filed yesterday with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Last month, Constellation terminated a $4.7 billion takeover deal with MidAmerican, which also had provided the immediate cash infusion in mid-September. At the time, CEG was teetering near bankruptcy amid a liquidity crisis in its commodities-trading business.
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | September 4, 1994
DICKERSON -- By late afternoon, as heavy cloud cover moved eastward over the area and broke up the heat of the day, fish were dimpling the surface in the pool that forms where the river backs up behind the sandbars and riffles above the Route 28 bridge.By early evening, baitfish were jumping in the shallows, pursued by smallmouth bass ready to feed again in the shoreline shadows of this section of the Monocacy.Earlier, the day had been pretty much a bust, with light spinning tackle and spinners and grubs catching only a handful of fat sunfish from the edges of patches of submerged grasses and two 8-inch smallmouth bass from behind rocks that broke the flow of the river.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 22, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The United Nations sanctions imposed on Yugoslavia have cost the other Danube Basin nations more than $12 billion in the last 11 months -- more than they have cost Yugoslavia, the governments of countries in the basin say.With the tightening of the sanctions by the Security Council on April 26, the Danube basin countries' losses in transportation, trade and industry are expected to grow in the coming months.The embargo, begun in June against Yugoslavia, which consists of Serbia and Montenegro, has cost it $4 billion, Belgrade estimated last week.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | May 18, 1997
BRUNSWICK -- The Canada goose had picked its spot carefully, choosing a rocky islet 30 yards out in the swift current of the Potomac River, where probably it expected few creatures to threaten the clutch of eggs tucked beneath her in a nest lined with down plucked from her breast.Yet last week, an intruder passed close by, casting plastic grubs for smallmouth bass, and the goose curled its neck low along the nest until its bill lay close to the small patch of soil captured among the rocks.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff writer | February 17, 1991
State environmental officials are negotiating with North Carroll Shopping Center and the former owners of a dry cleaner there to recoup the cost of cleaning contaminated ground water behind the building, said the Maryland Department of the Environment.Current C & C Dry Cleaners owner Charley Pak is not responsible and didn't own the business when the contamination was found in 1987, said department spokesman John Goheen. Pak bought the business in 1989.The MDE will continue testing residential wells as a precaution and hopes to start a cleanup by the end of the year, Goheen said.
BUSINESS
By Jon Van and Jon Van,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 23, 2005
Electronic mail promoting cut-rate Viagra or how to make big bucks working from home will get pitched right back to the senders by a free program from IBM. The program, announced yesterday, will identify computers that originate unwanted e-mail, or spam, and bounce it back at the sender - in effect, spamming the spammer. The program, designed for use by large businesses, underscores the frustration felt by companies that see the vast majority of their e-mail flooded with junk. "Spam has become a high priority security issue for businesses," said Stuart McIrvine, International Business Machines Corp.
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