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By Michele Nevard and Michele Nevard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 2, 1997
LONDON -- Princess Diana is dead and Britain is in mourning.But we don't normally grieve this way, so overwhelmed that we can't hold back our tears.We're British. We don't show our feelings.But this time, we've been caught off-guard.Centuries of the famed British "stiff upper lip" have stood us in good stead until now. But something has slowly crept up on us and taken us by surprise.So, what's happened?Sunday morning and the country wakes up to the news of the death. Friends of mine hear their neighbor's television blaring through the wall and can't believe what's being reported.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2014
Those who have a habit of biting their lips may find that a small bluish bump has developed inside their mouth. It might disappear on its own or it might linger. Dr. Zaineb Hassan Makhzoumi, an assistant professor of dermatology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, said they are more annoying than dangerous. But those who suffer from them may want to have them removed by a doctor. How common are mucous cysts, and why do they form? Mucous cysts, also known as mucoceles, are quite common in the general population, usually occurring on the lower lip. The majority of cases (70 percent)
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FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Contributing Writers | April 6, 1993
When is the best time to start shaving? My 14-year-old son wants to start, but I think he's kind of young.As far as we know, there isn't any law of nature or biological fact that allows us to say with certainty when an individual should begin shaving. The decision, therefore, should be according to your son's desires, although some schools or businesses have codes regarding beards and mustaches.Facial hair growth proceeds in an orderly sequence during the latter stages of puberty (around age 13 or 14)
NEWS
Susan Reimer | February 11, 2013
Oh, the physical sacrifices I make for my job as a journalist. True, I have never been assaulted by a mob in Cairo's Tahrir Square, as CBS' Lara Logan was. And I've never been injured by a bomb, as happened to ABC's Bob Woodruff and CBS' Kimberly Dozier in Iraq. In fact, the last time I left Maryland for an assignment, it was to cover the Philadelphia Flower Show, and that's not exactly hazard duty. But I am recovering from injuries suffered while writing a food story for our Wednesday Taste section, and I'd like a little more attention to my suffering than I got in the emergency room.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Contributing Writers | November 17, 1992
Q: What is a hare lip and what can be done about it? We were told a cousin's baby was born with one, and we're embarrassed to ask.A: You have probably heard the term "cleft lip" used for this mild birth defect. Early in development, the upper lip and roof of the mouth are formed when tissue growing in from each side of the face meets tissue growing down from the nose. If the parts don't grow together properly, there will be an indentation or defect in the upper lip. Sometimes the defect continues all the way up into the nostril and even involves the roof of the mouth (cleft palate)
NEWS
By Froma Harrop | June 17, 1999
THESE characters are fictional. Mr. and Mrs. Ewing of Passaic, N.J., tell their 15-year-old daughter Amy: "No tattoos." A month later at Monmouth Beach, Amy bends over to pick up her mascara wand, and her bathing suit rides up in back. What do the Ewings see on her left lower buttock but a tattoo of a red rose. Amy has defied her parents. Whose problem is it? Why, it's Gov. Christine Todd Whitman's, of course.Indeed -- and this part is not fictional -- social conservatives in the state of New Jersey are trying to put this matter onto the desk of the governor.
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | May 11, 2003
A Memorable Place A baby rhino means hope in Zimbabwe By Gina Rumore SPECIAL TO THE SUN Through the 10-foot-tall pens made of scrawny mopane tree trunks, I catch a glimpse of a massive baby. Though less than a year old, it is already larger than the biggest pig I have ever seen -- though its body shape doesn't appear to be all that different. With a guard's permission, I wriggle my arm between two of the tree trunks and hold out my hand for the rhino to inspect. With its muscular upper lip, the baby probes the palm of my hand.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | February 11, 2013
Oh, the physical sacrifices I make for my job as a journalist. True, I have never been assaulted by a mob in Cairo's Tahrir Square, as CBS' Lara Logan was. And I've never been injured by a bomb, as happened to ABC's Bob Woodruff and CBS' Kimberly Dozier in Iraq. In fact, the last time I left Maryland for an assignment, it was to cover the Philadelphia Flower Show, and that's not exactly hazard duty. But I am recovering from injuries suffered while writing a food story for our Wednesday Taste section, and I'd like a little more attention to my suffering than I got in the emergency room.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 15, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Regardless of their political persuasion, what part of the country they hail from, or what their interest was in seeing a snippet of the Senate impeachment trial live, some of the Americans who lined up outside the Capitol yesterday had something in common: They seemed to forget that President Clinton has already been impeached."
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | December 7, 1992
He'd wanted it for years. He maneuvered and schmoozed an cadged and hustled, and now, at last, he was exactly where he wanted to be, about to start doing exactly what he wanted to be doing, and he and he alone had exclusive rights.His response?"Despair," says David Thomson, 51, the author of the just published and brilliantly received biography of legendary movie producer David O. Selznick, "Showman."For what lay ahead of Mr. Thomson was 57,000 pounds of paper -- possibly the largest collection of Hollywood documents in the world, which painstakingly traced the life and times of the maker of "Gone With the Wind."
TRAVEL
By Donna M. Owens, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2012
As excitement builds for this week's opening of the Summer Olympics, many an armchair athlete may yearn to hop a transcontinental flight to London. But if a trip overseas isn't in the cards right now, why not discover a taste of jolly olde England closer to home? The nation's capital offers its own brand of proper British attractions, dining and lodging, say experts, suitable for even the most discerning Anglophile. "There are actually quite a few similarities between Europe and Washington, D.C., and one can certainly discover elements of British culture close to home," says Georgia Johnson Kicklighter of American Express Travel.
SPORTS
By ROCH KUBATKO | February 15, 2008
The first day of workouts gave Orioles players one chance to break the club's facial-hair policy. That's it. Relievers Jamie Walker and Chad Bradford sported full beards. Relievers George Sherrill and Ryan Bukvich wore goatees. And manager Dave Trembley wore a look of amusement that isn't going to last through the weekend. A long-standing team rule allows only mustaches, and they can't extend past the corners of the mouth. "I told them that I'm not old enough to play golf, but they have a mulligan today," Trembley said.
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | May 11, 2003
A Memorable Place A baby rhino means hope in Zimbabwe By Gina Rumore SPECIAL TO THE SUN Through the 10-foot-tall pens made of scrawny mopane tree trunks, I catch a glimpse of a massive baby. Though less than a year old, it is already larger than the biggest pig I have ever seen -- though its body shape doesn't appear to be all that different. With a guard's permission, I wriggle my arm between two of the tree trunks and hold out my hand for the rhino to inspect. With its muscular upper lip, the baby probes the palm of my hand.
NEWS
By Maureen Dowd | October 16, 2001
WASHINGTON - Wednesday, Oct. 3: I call my doctor to plead for Cipro, the antibiotic that may not work on the Deadly Anthrax Virus but then again may. I tell him a man in Florida near the hijackers' training ground has been stricken. "Was he a farmer?" my doctor asks. "I don't know," I say. "I don't care. I want my Cipro." He mutters something about an epidemic of inanity. I explain that the terrorists are coming back to finish the job here, where they were interrupted; that they've been cyaniding dogs and Sarin-ing bunnies in Afghanistan; and that I've even heard of neighbors fashioning safe rooms with special lighting to kill viruses.
NEWS
By Froma Harrop | June 17, 1999
THESE characters are fictional. Mr. and Mrs. Ewing of Passaic, N.J., tell their 15-year-old daughter Amy: "No tattoos." A month later at Monmouth Beach, Amy bends over to pick up her mascara wand, and her bathing suit rides up in back. What do the Ewings see on her left lower buttock but a tattoo of a red rose. Amy has defied her parents. Whose problem is it? Why, it's Gov. Christine Todd Whitman's, of course.Indeed -- and this part is not fictional -- social conservatives in the state of New Jersey are trying to put this matter onto the desk of the governor.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 15, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Regardless of their political persuasion, what part of the country they hail from, or what their interest was in seeing a snippet of the Senate impeachment trial live, some of the Americans who lined up outside the Capitol yesterday had something in common: They seemed to forget that President Clinton has already been impeached."
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2014
Those who have a habit of biting their lips may find that a small bluish bump has developed inside their mouth. It might disappear on its own or it might linger. Dr. Zaineb Hassan Makhzoumi, an assistant professor of dermatology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, said they are more annoying than dangerous. But those who suffer from them may want to have them removed by a doctor. How common are mucous cysts, and why do they form? Mucous cysts, also known as mucoceles, are quite common in the general population, usually occurring on the lower lip. The majority of cases (70 percent)
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | February 21, 1993
The blood gushes from John Ohman's nostrils, pouring a red river across his upper lip, dribbling down into his mouth, bubbling back onto his chin and finally collecting in pink puddles on the front of his gold T-shirt.Twenty seconds to go, behind on points, and Ohman, the plebe, is in trouble.He is flailing, now, punching the air, searching for Troy Turner, a senior, a leader of leaders at the Naval Academy.Ohman misses with a right. And then a left.The clock keeps ticking.All Turner must do to win is retreat, to stand as the final bell sounds.
NEWS
By JACK W. GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | December 22, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Roy Romer likes to talk about how he is far more interested in ''substance'' than in ''process and politics.'' And those who have followed his 11-year career as governor of Colorado attest to his credentials as, among other things, a policy wonk.Party in a boxBut in his part-time role as general chairman of the Democratic National Committee, Mr. Romer is inevitably preoccupied by fundamental questions of process. One is how to get the Democratic Party out of the box into which it has been squeezed by the investigations of President Clinton's fund-raising excesses in 1996.
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