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NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and Rona Kobell and JoAnna Daemmrich and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | September 23, 2004
Floodwaters from the rain-swollen Susquehanna River have flushed 30-foot trees, gnarled clumps of branches, road barricades and old tires into the upper Chesapeake Bay--a flotilla of debris that is alarming boaters and environmental activists. The U.S. Coast Guard is broadcasting warnings three times a day, cautioning boaters to be on the lookout in the northern end of the bay. Most of the debris, which could damage boats and smash into piers and docks, was unleashed by the heavy rains accompanying the remnants of Hurricane Ivan.
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NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | May 13, 2001
An important Baltimore shipping artery has been blocked after an accident at the eastern mouth of the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal. The Bay Titan, a 115-foot-long coastal tugboat, capsized Friday while turning into the canal from the Delaware River. The vessel is expected to block the 450-foot-wide channel until it can be removed with a crane. A member of its crew is missing and feared dead. The 19-mile sea-level canal, which links the upper Chesapeake Bay with the Delaware River, cuts 300 miles from a trip between Philadelphia and Baltimore.
SPORTS
By Jeff Seidel and Jeff Seidel,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 24, 2005
North East of Cecil County worked hard to shut down Aberdeen's Robbie Jackson last night. The Indians often triple-teamed the 7-foot senior center and held him to two points. But they couldn't stop the rest of the Eagles. Marlon Jenifer scored a season-best 21 points, Kashif Brown added 16 and Devron Galloway had 12 as No. 9 Aberdeen rolled to an 85-42 victory in the Upper Chesapeake Bay Athletic Conference championship game at Harford Tech. Aberdeen (18-4) also won the UCBAC championship last year in the conference's first season.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin DTC and Todd Richissin DTC,SUN STAFF | February 23, 1998
NORTH EAST -- Early in the 1960s, Eleanore Benjamin recalls, she and her husband, Herb, plopped down $8,000 for a boxy building on Main Street, painted their name on a shingle and declared themselves open for business.Not every town is clamoring for a business where residents can stop for a bucket of minnows and a haircut, but that is exactly what they created. And despite a couple of crises -- fishing bans and an era of longer hair -- Herb's Tackle Shop has survived.But now the Benjamins are facing something they fear they cannot overcome.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,SUN STAFF | February 26, 2004
After her team beat Edgewood, 48-45, yesterday in the championship game of the Upper Chesapeake Bay Athletic Conference, Aberdeen senior guard Tameka McDonald kept focusing on the big picture, but couldn't help but enjoy what the Eagles had just accomplished. McDonald and the 19th-ranked Eagles happily posed for pictures at C. Milton Wright, celebrating their status as the first-ever UCBAC champion in girls basketball. The Eagles, who have made two consecutive trips to the Class 2A state semifinals before losing, hope a similar celebration ensues next month in the state championships, but McDonald said last night's title will do for now. "I am so happy that we are the first team to win this," said McDonald, who scored a team-high 13 points to go along with six rebounds and six steals.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2012
Capt. Herbert Hamilton Ward III, a retired career naval officer who was active in Upper Chesapeake Bay environmental matters and other issues, died March 17 from complications of a blood clot at Gilchrist Hospice in Towson. The Broadmead retirement community resident was 91. The son of a lawyer and a homemaker, Herbert Hamilton Ward III was born and raised in Wilmington, Del., where he graduated in 1939 from Friends School. He was a member of an accelerated wartime class at the Naval Academy, from which he graduated in 1943.
FEATURES
By Steve Kilar and Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2011
Chessie, the wandering Florida manatee that has visited the Chesapeake Bay at least twice over the past 17 years, is back. The well-traveled mammal has not been seen since 2001, and his resurfacing is making waves among marine scientists and bay folk alike. "I wanted to let you know that the [U.S. Geological Survey] identified the manatee from Wednesday, and it's a familiar face to us … it's Chessie!," said Jennifer Dittmar, stranding coordinator for the National Aquarium, in an email to a Calvert Marine Museum staffer, confirming the animal's return.
SPORTS
By Mike Kobus and Mike Kobus,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 29, 1999
One of the great things about crabbing is that you have your choice of methods, from the relatively inexpensive hand-lining to the more sophisticated use of crab pots or trotlines.Although I'm partial to using collapsible traps, many commercial crabbers and sportsmen prefer the trotline. For a change of pace last week, I decided to pull out my line and try my luck.A trotline consists of a 300- to 1,500-foot line baited every 3 to 5 feet, with chains attached intermittently to keep it on the bottom, and a float and anchor at each end.When laying a trotline, drop a float and 20-pound anchor, and feed the line into the water, pulling it taut before dropping the other float and anchor.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | April 8, 1996
New security measures for Montana include metal detectors on the Idaho border, wolves trained to sniff out explosives and mandatory checking of guns at the coffee houses.Unabomber alone caused this country more grief than all Libya.Cheer up. Shortnose sturgeon have returned to the upper bay.Q. Where is the watchdog? A. In the doghouse, watching.Pub Date: 4/08/96
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | February 13, 2005
FOR AS LONG as sportsmen and women have been trying to gain an edge over critters, there have been companies peddling the next gimmick to give humans supremacy over members of the animal kingdom. As a member of Homo sapiens with a college degree who owns two rather large house cats with an agenda, I can only repeat the immortal words of Aerosmith: "Dream on." Yet, every season battery-powered gizmos and genetically jiggered bait flood the market. The latest must-have in our market is the "Black Salty," a live bait so powerful, we're told, that the whale would spit up Jonah to make room.
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