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By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Evening Sun Staff | March 6, 1991
George Falter, owner of Able Industries Inc., says the high cost of business insurance kept him from insuring his 11-year-old upholstery firm.Yesterday, a four-alarm fire destroyed the warehouse that houses the firm, causing an estimated $200,000 in damages, fire officials said."
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2011
Cynthia MacKinnon says she is working at her dream job, thanks to training and encouragement she received at the Caroline Center in East Baltimore. The nonprofit center, run by the School Sisters of Notre Dame, a Roman Catholic religious order, celebrates its 15th anniversary Thursday with a salute to MacKinnon and others who acquired education and job skills within its walls. "We are flourishing," said Sister Patricia McLaughlin, the center's executive director. "Meeting all these wonderful women and watching them blossom has been a blessing to us. " More than 1,500 women have completed the center's employment readiness programs since it opened its doors on Somerset Street.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun Reporter | August 20, 2008
James Edward Cherry Sr., who owned and operated an upholstery firm in downtown Baltimore for more than 50 years and was an active member of Leadenhall Baptist Church for even longer, died of cancer Aug. 13 at his Pikesville home. He was 97. Born and raised in Suffolk, Va., Mr. Cherry came to Baltimore in 1937. "A man taught him upholstering, and in 1940 he established Cherry's Upholstering Co. in the 1100 block of Pennsylvania Ave.," said a daughter, Sandra Williams of Catonsville. He later relocated the business to North Gay Street and finally to the corner of Lexington and Greene streets, where it remained for more than 20 years.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun Reporter | August 20, 2008
James Edward Cherry Sr., who owned and operated an upholstery firm in downtown Baltimore for more than 50 years and was an active member of Leadenhall Baptist Church for even longer, died of cancer Aug. 13 at his Pikesville home. He was 97. Born and raised in Suffolk, Va., Mr. Cherry came to Baltimore in 1937. "A man taught him upholstering, and in 1940 he established Cherry's Upholstering Co. in the 1100 block of Pennsylvania Ave.," said a daughter, Sandra Williams of Catonsville. He later relocated the business to North Gay Street and finally to the corner of Lexington and Greene streets, where it remained for more than 20 years.
NEWS
August 30, 1992
Upholstery plant sold, workers will be hiredNEW WINDSOR -- Stanton Industries of Maryland, new owner of a furniture upholstery plant here, probably will double its labor force in the next three to six months, the plant manager said.The plant at 1003 Tibbetts Lane currently employs 34 people, said manager Jimmy Hawkins.Stanton, whose corporate headquarters are in Tualatin, Ore., bought the New Windsor division of AW Industries in mid-August.AW Industries, of Landover, made sleeper sofas here since the late 1970s, said Mr. Hawkins.
FEATURES
By Deborah Hofman and Deborah Hofman,N.Y. Times News Service | December 12, 1990
NEW YORK Recycling has taken a whimsical turn in the world of fashion as designers adapt American icons from other days and contexts and re-introduce them as accessories.Susan P. Meisel Decorative Arts in New York sells handbags made by prisoners in the 1930s through 1950s. The bags are woven of cellophane-coated cigarette wrappers ($175).A few prison purses sometimes turn up at Allan & Suzi in New York where they are about $300. The store also sells vests made by a Connecticut artist, Janet Cooper, out of old soda-bottle caps ($80)
FEATURES
By RITA ST.CLAIR and RITA ST.CLAIR,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | August 25, 1991
Q: Instead of the usual wallpaper, I had planned to cover a wall in my dining room with a fabric that I like. A friend told me that the installation method would be more complicated than for wallpaper. Do you think it's still sensible for me to pursue the fabric option?A: While I'm not an expert on installation techniques, I do think your friend has exaggerated the difficulty of applying a fabric wall covering.Latex or paper-backed fabrics can easily be affixed to a wall by a professional paperhanger.
FEATURES
By Linda Bennett and Linda Bennett,Contributing Writer | October 25, 1992
HIGH POINT, N.C. -- It was peak fall foliage season last week when about 50,000 interior designers and furniture buyers came to High Point for the twice-annual International Home Furnishings Market.Once inside the showrooms, though, the prevailing color was green -- in shades that included lettuce, willow, sage, Granny Smith, mistletoe, hunter, sea-foam, celadon, artichoke, moss, olive and brackish."The shift to green was a natural evolution," noted Lisa Kent, fashion coordinator for the upholstery division of Broyhill Furniture Industries.
FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | September 3, 1995
Q: The sofa and chairs in my living room are comfortably squishy, with the skirted upholstery found in many traditional settings. But I want to give the room a more contemporary and sophisticated look. How can that be done without sacrificing comfort?A: This photograph of the work of New York designer Celeste Cooper should provide some ideas. She created a contemporary look in a traditionally styled room that retains many of her client's favorite pieces.Color, texture and contrast are the elements that Ms. Cooper relied on.Let's consider color first.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2011
Cynthia MacKinnon says she is working at her dream job, thanks to training and encouragement she received at the Caroline Center in East Baltimore. The nonprofit center, run by the School Sisters of Notre Dame, a Roman Catholic religious order, celebrates its 15th anniversary Thursday with a salute to MacKinnon and others who acquired education and job skills within its walls. "We are flourishing," said Sister Patricia McLaughlin, the center's executive director. "Meeting all these wonderful women and watching them blossom has been a blessing to us. " More than 1,500 women have completed the center's employment readiness programs since it opened its doors on Somerset Street.
BUSINESS
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Tribune Media Services | October 14, 2007
I'm tired of looking at the floral-patterned rug and the damask silk-covered sofa and chairs in my living room. Its overall color scheme is gold, red and blue. How can I give the room a more contemporary look without getting rid of everything in it? I especially don't want to redo my dark wood floor. You probably won't need to toss the whole setup in order to achieve the effect you want. But you certainly should replace that rug and re-cover your furniture. Choose a neutral color scheme - possibly consisting of off-white, beige and camel - for the larger surfaces and for the covers of the sofa and chairs.
NEWS
By Claire Whitcomb and Claire Whitcomb,Universal Press Syndicate | August 24, 2003
One of the most delightful ways to reinvent your decorating style is to head to sea -- in your imagination or on the pages of Sailing Style: Nautical Inspirations for the Home (Clarkson Potter, $30). In this shipshape new book, designer and author Tricia Foley shows how much of our architectural and design vocabulary is linked to the sea. "Think bunk beds and mother-of-pearl," she says. "Think deck chairs and hammocks and blue-and-white stripes. All have a seafaring legacy." In Sailing Style, she journeys with photographer Michael Skott and writer Jill Kirchner Simpson to lighthouses and saltboxes, to "stone enders" and converted boathouses up and down the East Coast.
NEWS
December 6, 2000
Grayson T. Ponder, 80, industrial engineer Grayson T. Ponder, a retired industrial engineer who was an expert in the field of pressurized chambers, died Thursday of cancer at his Abingdon home. He was 80. During his 20-year career at Dixie Air Engineering Co. in Baltimore, Mr. Ponder worked on the development and design of pressurized chambers used by the Navy for underwater exploration and salvage work and by University of Maryland Hospital for medical treatment. He retired as vice president of operations in 1987.
NEWS
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff | May 23, 1999
Dinner at the White HouseWhen you regularly dine with diplomats, members of royalty, celebrities and prominent politicians, it behooves you to have nice china and tableware. And if the place you call home is the White House, the table settings should be both splendid and symbolic of what this country stands for.From George and Martha Washington's plain French china (which he took home to Mount Vernon when he left office) to the elaborate wildflower china of Lyndon and Lady Bird Johnson, the design, uses and occasions of White House table settings are elaborated in "Official White House China: 1789 to the Present," by Margaret Brown Klaphor, with additions and revisions by Betty C. Monkton, William G. Allman and Susan Gray Detweiler (Abrams, 1999, $49.50)
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | November 30, 1998
When Mary-Melissa Harris met her future husband several years ago, she advised him to quit his engineering studies and do what he really wanted -- make and refinish furniture.He did exactly that. And four children later, he returned the compliment, advising his wife to leave her job as night secretary at Frederick Memorial Hospital and start an upholstery business.Today, they are both doing what they love -- and making a comfortable living together doing it.Part of their satisfaction is that the success of her 5-year-old business in Taneytown has grown largely by word of mouth.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | November 4, 1998
JOSEPH VOWELS, the talented Baltimore interior designer and upholsterer who was beaten in his Mount Vernon shop during an apparent robbery two weeks ago today, died before dawn Monday at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 75 and had lived in Baltimore for half a century. Friends have put up $10,000 as a reward for information that will lead police to his killer."I'm angry, very, very angry," said Trudy Kotrosa, one of the many people who appreciated Vowels' many talents and enjoyed his friendship and his generous way of entertaining.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | November 4, 1998
JOSEPH VOWELS, the talented Baltimore interior designer and upholsterer who was beaten in his Mount Vernon shop during an apparent robbery two weeks ago today, died before dawn Monday at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 75 and had lived in Baltimore for half a century. Friends have put up $10,000 as a reward for information that will lead police to his killer."I'm angry, very, very angry," said Trudy Kotrosa, one of the many people who appreciated Vowels' many talents and enjoyed his friendship and his generous way of entertaining.
FEATURES
By Robin Updike and Robin Updike,Seattle Times | November 15, 1992
Fashion is fickle. Just ask Pendleton Woolen Mills.Now that the venerable company is grappling with how to make its biggest product line, women's wear, seem more fashionable, its oldest product, Native American-style ceremonial blankets, are all the rage."
FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | April 12, 1998
Many interior designers, myself included, will gladly reconfigure a bed whenever a style-conscious client requests it. Giving an old bed a new look can be a practical challenge as well as an opportunity to give form to a fantasy. That's why so many different designs -- from beds in the shapes of mythical swans to headboards that look like bookcases -- have been attempted at one time or another.The so-called Hollywood Bed of the 1930s ushered in one of the biggest changes in modern American bed design.
FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | September 3, 1995
Q: The sofa and chairs in my living room are comfortably squishy, with the skirted upholstery found in many traditional settings. But I want to give the room a more contemporary and sophisticated look. How can that be done without sacrificing comfort?A: This photograph of the work of New York designer Celeste Cooper should provide some ideas. She created a contemporary look in a traditionally styled room that retains many of her client's favorite pieces.Color, texture and contrast are the elements that Ms. Cooper relied on.Let's consider color first.
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