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FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 14, 2001
More reality TV for us, less money for the networks, and new series for Jill Hennessy and chef Emeril Lagasse on NBC. That's what the news is expected to be today as NBC announces its new fall prime-time schedule in New York launching the 2001-2002 network TV upfront sales season. The strange annual dance between the network television industry and Madison Avenue features the six broadcast networks announcing new lineups of fall shows - some of which exist only on paper - and advertisers voting thumbs-up or thumbs-down to those shows with the time they buy or don't buy for next fall.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | April 11, 2001
Sykesville's efforts to renovate aging hospital buildings at the Warfield Complex into a business and academic center received a $300,000 boost from the Carroll County commissioners yesterday. The commissioners unanimously approved a $300,000 grant and made Carroll a partner with the town and state in the restoration of the Warfield Complex. The state recently budgeted $100,000 for the effort, bringing Maryland's contribution to nearly $400,000. "The county has given us the spark to start the fire," said Sykesville Mayor Jonathan S. Herman.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | April 11, 2001
Sykesville's efforts to renovate aging hospital buildings at the Warfield Complex into a business and academic center received a $300,000 boost from the Carroll County commissioners yesterday. The commissioners unanimously approved a $300,000 grant and made Carroll a partner with the town and state in the restoration of the Warfield Complex. The state recently budgeted $100,000 for the effort, bringing Maryland's contribution to nearly $400,000. "The county has given us the spark to start the fire," said Sykesville Mayor Jonathan S. Herman.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | February 14, 2001
1999 Cinnabar "Quicksilver" Central Coast Chardonnay ($17.50). This well-balanced, toasty, full-bodied chardonnay would be an ideal companion to a salmon fillet in a rich cream sauce. It offers impressive apple, melon and lemon flavors with a well-calibrated touch of oak. The texture is soft and creamy upfront, but it finishes with good acidity. This wine is a blend of juice from three vineyard sites in California's Central Coast region, an area that is showing considerable strength in chardonnay.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | September 30, 1999
More than 10 years ago, when Ira D. Greene looked for an assisted-living home for his grandmother, he found that no place would accept the Northwest Baltimore woman without at least $150,000 just to get in the door.Even if his immigrant grandmother from Kiev had that kind of money, he said, "she would have had a coronary" signing the check.Out of Greene's frustration grew his decision to develop a rental assisted-living facility for the elderly -- without an upfront fee.Yesterday, Greene, a nursing-home owner in Rodgers Forge, along with executives of Genesis ElderCare of Pennsylvania, broke ground on Atrium Village, a $28.5 million, 230,000-square-foot project in Owings Mills for 278 residences.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | August 25, 1999
There is no quarterback controversy, not after two preseason games, not when Scott Mitchell is becoming increasingly efficient, not when Tony Banks is facing only second- and third-team defenses.There is no quarterback controversy, and Brian Billick said that there will never be one, not as long as he is Ravens coach, no matter how much fans and media protest."I have final say," Billick proclaimed after yesterday morning's practice at Western Maryland College. "There is no controversy unless I become schizophrenic."
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | November 18, 1998
1997 Beringer Napa Valley Sauvignon Blanc ($13).This lush, complex, rounded, dry sauvignon offers a fullness of flavor and compatibility with food that few chardonnays can match. The soft, toasty upfront feel never loses its sense of proportion. It's a wonderfully rich, long wine for this price. It would be ideal with grilled salmon, but has tremendous versatility. It offers exceptional complexity for the price.Pub Date: 11/18/98@
SPORTS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | February 6, 1998
He has won three gold medals and might even pick up a couple more this month. But desperate to avoid becoming to athletics what Erik Estrada is to show biz, Italian skiing star Alberto Tomba resorted to the only means available: He got himself a snazzy Web site.And what a Web site it is, complete with a topless Tomba revealing enough chest hair to make Chewbacca jealous.For those craving more of the Nagano Games than they can get on television, the Internet will be the place to go for more information about the games, the events and the athletes.
BUSINESS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | April 2, 1997
Housing officials yesterday unveiled a federally funded program designed to help middle-income people buy houses in the city's poorer neighborhoods by paying part of their down-payments and taxes.The "Empowerment Zone Housing Venture Fund" will pay up to $5,000 toward the initial costs of buying a house for the first 400 working people who promise to live in the city's poorer neighborhoods for at least five years.The initiative is designed to stabilize communities at risk of falling apart and help people who might not otherwise be able to come up with enough cash upfront to buy a home, said Michael Preston, a spokesman for the Empower Baltimore Management Corp.
BUSINESS
By Jane Bryant Quinn | February 19, 1996
NEW YORK -- Homeowners are swarming to redo their mortgages.Behind the boom: a drop in interest rates and mortgage fees. Last year at this time, interest rates on fixed loans averaged 9.3 percent, according to HSH Associates in Butler, N.J. Now they're at 7.3 percent. Upfront costs are also down. That makes it profitable to refinance for a rate cut of around 1 percent, says John Lewis, managing editor of Inside Mortgage Finance, a newsletter based in Bethesda, Md.Here's the traditional way of telling whether refinancing will pay:Compare the new loan's upfront cost with the total amount that you'll save in monthly payments each year.
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