Advertisement
HomeCollectionsUnwrapped
IN THE NEWS

Unwrapped

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,Sun Staff | September 7, 2003
I HAD ALWAYS considered corn dogs the lowest food on the food chain -- until I watched an episode of Unwrapped and learned that corn dogs are almost health food. I never lost sleep wondering how many licks it takes to get to the center of a Tootsie Pop or how they make Pop Rocks pop in your mouth. But that kind of junk information about junk food is on the menu at Unwrapped, on the Food Network every Monday night at 9. "We did a segment on chocolate," recalls host Marc Summers. "And we talked about 'hot' chocolate -- chocolate made with hot peppers.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Gwendolyn Glenn | September 11, 2013
If you like sci-fi mixed in with surreal choreography and a complicated father-daughter relationship, you're going to love "Gift of Forgotten Tongues," on stage at Venus Theatre on C Street through Sept. 28. Written by New York-based playwright Fengar Gael, the futuristic play is sometimes fast-paced and sometimes not, with the characters skillfully pulling the audience into their troubled lives. The play takes place in the lab of Dr. Weaver, a geneticist who wants to someday win a Nobel Prize and is hoping an ethically questionable experiment will make it happen.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 11, 1994
Police are looking for a man who robbed a Shell gas station in the 8000 block of Ritchie Highway Monday afternoon.Police said the man was sitting on a curb near the station's car wash at 2:13 p.m., then walked into the gas station carrying a short-barreled shotgun wrapped in a white towel. He unwrapped the shotgun and told the cashier to give him some money.The suspect took the money, left the station and walked through a nearby parking lot, police said.
FEATURES
By Jamie Bacon, For The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2013
While my wedding and bridal showers are still a ways away I can't help but think of them often. One of the things that has constantly been on my mind is all the attention I will be receiving. I am fine with this on my wedding day because I know I will be sharing the spotlight with my husband-to-be. However, when it comes to the bridal shower all eyes are on me and the thought of this terrifies me. I am a shy person and don't usually enjoy being the center of attention. I am comfortable and outgoing around close friends and relatives so if the shower is on the smaller side it should be fine but if it ends up being a good amount of people it makes me nervous.
NEWS
November 19, 2001
`Pilgrims' to greet passengers this week; steel band to play Passengers traveling through Baltimore-Washington International Airport this holiday week may encounter performers dressed as Pilgrims who will circulate through the terminal sharing their Thanksgiving experiences. Part of BWI's entertainment program, the "Pilgrims" will speak with passengers using idioms common in 1620. The performers will appear from 3:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, as well as Nov. 25 and Nov. 30. Also on Wednesday, St. Veronica's Youth Steel Orchestra will play seasonal music.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood | December 26, 2001
Holiday shrimp sauce Holiday foods don't have to be fattening, Weight Watchers International shows with its shrimp-cocktail recipe. Combine 1/2 cup of ketchup, 2 tablespoons of lime juice, 2 teaspoons of Worcestershire sauce and 1/2 teaspoon of hot-pepper sauce. Serve with 1 1/4 pounds of medium-sized, prepared shrimp. This makes 4 servings, 158 calories each. Ethnic groceries Do you have a particular place that you buy Asian noodles or German bread? We want to hear about it. The Sun is compiling a list of ethnic groceries in the Baltimore area.
EXPLORE
December 1, 2011
The Aegis Empty Stocking Fund is moving closer to its 2011 fund-raising goal of $80,000, but the fund is still more than $34,000 short as the annual drive to help less fortune Harford County families and senior citizens have a happier holiday season moves into December. As of Wednesday, $45,340 had been received. Special thanks for recent donations goes to Gerry and Susan Manuel, $100; Ron and Lynda Kerdasha, $200; Stephen and Laureen Egan, $750; Jennie Fleckenstein, $100; Frances Burkheimer, $300; Robert and Rose Coomes, $150; Rainbow Rebekah Lodge 95, $150; Margaret Arnold, $150; Elizabeth Smith and the late Coach Jim Smith, $200; and Bunny Worthington, $200.
FEATURES
November 25, 2002
With the cooperation of wife Nancy and children Patti, Ron and Michael, the documentary Ronald Reagan: A Legacy Remembered looks at personal aspects of the 40th president along with his public career. Others interviewed include top officials from the Reagan era, including James Baker, George Shultz and Casper Weinberger. The program airs tonight at 9 on the History Channel. At a glance Primetime: Special Edition (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WJLA, Channel 7) -- In an episode called "Trapped," the news show takes on a Worst-Case Scenario Survival Handbook bent, examining how fast a building can fill with smoke and how to escape, how to get out of a submerged vehicledown and submerged and how to get out of a locked car trunk, among others.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | September 5, 2002
A historic diner that sat idle for a decade on York Road near the Senator movie theater left Baltimore early yesterday bound for Providence, R.I., where it will find a home at the American Diner Museum. The diner, which had shrink-wrap around it, had become a familiar sight in the 5800 block of York Road at the otherwise vacant lot where it sat for about a decade. Tom Kiefaber, owner of the nearby art deco movie theater, had bought the pre-World War II Lemoyne-style Pennsylvania diner for $20,000, hoping to restore it as a centerpiece for a larger diner.
NEWS
By Anna Quindlen | August 8, 1991
THE VOICE I assume for children's bad behavior is like a winter coat, dark and heavy. I put it on the other night when my eldest child appeared in the kitchen doorway, an hour after he had gone to bed."What are you doing down here?" I began to say, when he interrupted, "I finished it!"The dominatrix tone went out the window and we settled down for an old-fashioned dish about the fine points of "The Phantom Tollbooth." It is the wonderful tale of a bored and discontented boy named Milo and the journey he makes one day in his toy car with the Humbug and the Spelling Bee and a slew of other fantastical characters who change his life.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2012
Spring arrived officially weeks ago, but restaurants are just rolling out their spring menus now. That's our planet for you; real spring arrives when it's good and ready. Bluegrass Tavern in South Baltimore debuts its spring menu Thursday night. New among the First Bites on Ray Kumm's menu: spring asparagus served with Vermont quark ravioli and hazelnut honey, Taylor Bay scallops with egg-yolk vermicelli and oyster mushrooms and chilled English pea soup with smokehouse-almond gelato and crawfish oil. Main Bites on Bluegrass Tavern's spring menu include Pan seared grouper, with butter braised leeks and crispy Hen-of-the-Woods mushrooms; milk-braise rabbit thigh; roasted poussin; crispy smoked Creekstone beef belly and grilled Broken Ranch antelope with fried duck egg, antelope "Merguez" and fava beans.
EXPLORE
December 1, 2011
The Aegis Empty Stocking Fund is moving closer to its 2011 fund-raising goal of $80,000, but the fund is still more than $34,000 short as the annual drive to help less fortune Harford County families and senior citizens have a happier holiday season moves into December. As of Wednesday, $45,340 had been received. Special thanks for recent donations goes to Gerry and Susan Manuel, $100; Ron and Lynda Kerdasha, $200; Stephen and Laureen Egan, $750; Jennie Fleckenstein, $100; Frances Burkheimer, $300; Robert and Rose Coomes, $150; Rainbow Rebekah Lodge 95, $150; Margaret Arnold, $150; Elizabeth Smith and the late Coach Jim Smith, $200; and Bunny Worthington, $200.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,elizabeth.large@baltsun.com | October 22, 2008
After I talked to Jerry Pellegrino, the owner of Corks in Federal Hill, the other day, I hung up the phone and wondered why he hadn't renamed his restaurant - oh - Say Cheese. Sometimes when restaurants close for renovations, they never reopen. As the weeks wore on, I was afraid that might have happened with Corks (1026 S. Charles St., 410-752-3810, corksrestaurant.com), but not so. The wine-centric restaurant was simply going through a much more major redo than most of us realized, one that took eight weeks to complete.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | March 19, 2008
For years it has been a quiet mystery in a glass case at the Walters Art Museum, where it rested a few feet from a 4,000-year-old coffin in what is known as the Afterlife Room. But yesterday the 5-foot, 2,900-year-old mummy traveled by truck to University of Maryland Medical Center for its first-ever CT scan to see whether scientists can learn more about it - including whether "it" is a he or a she. For the mummy and its retinue, the biggest challenge was the same one facing everyone negotiating Baltimore's midday traffic: getting there in one piece.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN REPORTER | November 16, 2007
On her way to meet with Santa Claus about her Christmas wish list, 8-year-old Ashley Hof of Columbia stopped to find out her status on the big guy's list of who's been bad and who has been good. She pushed a glowing button on the "naughty or nice meter" and watched the giant arrow swing back and forth a few times before settling on a positive judgment. Ashley smiled big and acknowledged, "I was a little worried." The meter - which tends to land on nice for all children - is one element of the new interactive holiday experience that opens today at The Mall in Columbia.
NEWS
By DAN THANH DANG and DAN THANH DANG,SUN REPORTER | November 27, 2005
Someone once said that life is not measured by how many breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away. Some people live their lives by that attitude - how else to explain all those rock climbers, bungee jumpers and extreme sports enthusiasts out there? And then there are those who buy gifts that embody that attitude. To understand, imagine the following two scenes: Scenario A: Stock car fan opens gift box to find tickets to a NASCAR race. Scenario B: Stock car fan opens gift box to find certificate to don a driving suit and helmet, whip 15 times around a speedway solo, then ride shotgun with a professional NASCAR driver for another heart-stopping five laps.
NEWS
June 15, 1996
Inaccuracies cited in mummy articleRichard O'Mara's May 14 article, "Wrapped up in mummies," contained inaccuracies concerning mummies in the collection of Goucher College.The article omitted mention of the fact that the partially unwrapped mummy of a woman on display in Gilman Hall at the Johns Hopkins University (known informally there as "Boris") and one of the mummies on view at the Walters Art Gallery are on loan from Goucher College. The Rev. John Franklin Goucher, the college's founder, received the mummies and other ancient Egyptian artifacts from an Egyptian museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2012
Spring arrived officially weeks ago, but restaurants are just rolling out their spring menus now. That's our planet for you; real spring arrives when it's good and ready. Bluegrass Tavern in South Baltimore debuts its spring menu Thursday night. New among the First Bites on Ray Kumm's menu: spring asparagus served with Vermont quark ravioli and hazelnut honey, Taylor Bay scallops with egg-yolk vermicelli and oyster mushrooms and chilled English pea soup with smokehouse-almond gelato and crawfish oil. Main Bites on Bluegrass Tavern's spring menu include Pan seared grouper, with butter braised leeks and crispy Hen-of-the-Woods mushrooms; milk-braise rabbit thigh; roasted poussin; crispy smoked Creekstone beef belly and grilled Broken Ranch antelope with fried duck egg, antelope "Merguez" and fava beans.
FEATURES
By Kim Hart and Kim Hart,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2005
Once a week for the past six years, Aurelia Loveman has buried herself in a storage room of the Baltimore Museum of Art, gingerly removing pieces of lace from the boxes, linen envelopes and silk sheets that have concealed them for 55 years. Elegant cuffs and collars that once adorned royalty in the 17th-century court of Louis XIV, delicate Chantilly lace parasol covers, gauzy shawls and intricately woven 19th-century needle-lace fan leafs are among the valuable remnants hiding inside their dusty tombs.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 11, 2005
Jamie Foxx has talked about his fear of getting "the fame face" - a complacent look that sometimes comes with show-biz success. Will Smith hasn't gotten there yet, but he should be wary of making more choices like Hitch. Smith deserves a smidgen of respect for what he does with this picture. He's agreeably smooth. His very presence puts velveteen on the rickety works of this slaphappy, sap-heavy farce and allows it to run pleasantly for about an hour. Yet he can't keep the movie from stopping cold with another hour left to go. Hitch will be a sizable hit. Audiences ache for romantic comedies at this time of year, and Hitch is as soft as a Valentine pillow embroidered with nostrums and surrounded by sugar and spice and everything nice.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.