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NEWS
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | April 20, 2008
When distinguished Baltimore artist and museum board member Amalie Rothschild died in 2001, at the age of 85, she left behind more than 1,200 paintings, sculptures and drawings in her Pikesville studio. Soon after her death, the artist's daughter and namesake, filmmaker-photographer Amalie Rothschild, decided to honor her mother's achievement with a coffee-table book documenting her best work, to be published later this year. Rothschild moved the contents of the Pikesville studio to a storage facility and began compiling a detailed list of titles and dates.
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SPORTS
By Michael Cunningham and Michael Cunningham,South Florida Sun-Sentinel | December 1, 2007
Fort Lauderdale, Fla. // There was little doubt that the Boston Celtics would improve by adding forward Kevin Garnett and guard Ray Allen to play alongside All-Star Paul Pierce. They had to after some lean seasons, but the transformation nonetheless has been instant and remarkable. There seemingly has been no feeling-out period required for the team's so-called Big Three. Boston started 8-0, its fourth-best start in franchise history. Dwyane Wade of the Miami Heat said he is not surprised.
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE | October 25, 2007
The longer the oversight lasts, the more stories like this will be told. And the oversight has lasted a long, long time, as long as the apparent vendetta. The facts will never change: In his 46 years on the scene, Art Modell did a great service to the NFL, to sports fans everywhere and to a proud but snubbed city and its football legacy. Stick a doughnut in my right hand, a Duff beer in my left and call me "Homer" if you like - but those facts should be enough to get Modell into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.
FEATURES
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,Sun reporter | September 27, 2007
Antonio Zamora, a lean 64-year-old computer scientist from Bethesda, suffers none of the chronic diseases that afflict people his age. "I haven't been sick for a long time," Zamora said. "Last year, my medical bill came to $20 - for my co-pay for my yearly medical exam." His secret: a variant of an ultra-low-calorie diet known to extend the lives of animals and protect humans from age-related diseases. Known as calorie restriction, or CR, the Spartan diet is one of several avenues researchers are exploring in their quest to understand and delay aging.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | August 25, 2007
AT&T is paying millions to be the exclusive U.S. provider of Apple's much-hyped and glowingly reviewed gadget, the iPhone. It took 17-year-old George Hotz two months of work to undermine AT&T's investment. Hotz, a resident of Glen Rock, N.J., published detailed instructions online this week that he says will let iPhone owners abandon AT&T Inc.'s wireless service and use their phones on some competing cellular networks. Hotz's method, which requires a soldering gun, a steady hand and a set of obscure software tools, is one of several techniques that have emerged over the past week to break the technological locks confining the iPhone to AT&T's network.
BUSINESS
By The Boston Globe | June 7, 2007
Behind rows of cell phone chargers and Bluetooth headsets at a kiosk in Boston's Shops at the Prudential Center, Evan Silbert is quietly loosening the grip that major telecommunications companies have on the cell phone. At his Warlox Wireless booth, Silbert unlocks customers' Razrs, BlackBerrys, Treos and other devices that start out tied to a single carrier so that, for example, a phone originally purchased through T-Mobile will work on a new AT&T account. He also uses software that can reveal menus or intrinsic capabilities that have been shut off by the carriers.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,Sun reporter | May 7, 2007
In a basement laboratory tucked amid the tourist attractions of Baltimore's Inner Harbor, two Israeli-born scientists are unlocking the mysteries of the Chesapeake Bay blue crab. Over the past five years, Yonathan Zohar and Odi Zmora have spent most of their waking hours poring over tanks filled with the snapping crustaceans and their tiny offspring at a University of Maryland lab on Pratt Street. They feed the crabs homemade algae tailored to their life stage. The researchers control the water temperature, light and salinity, and document the crustaceans' every move as they shed their shells, mate and reproduce.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 29, 2007
On an Internet chat room popular with breast cancer survivors, one thread - called "Where's My Remote?" - turns the mental fog known as "chemo brain" into a stand-up comedy act. One woman reported finding five unopened gallons of milk in her refrigerator and having no memory of buying the first four. A second had to ask her husband which toothbrush belonged to her. At a family celebration, one woman filled the water glasses with turkey gravy. Another could not remember how to carry over numbers when balancing the checkbook.
SPORTS
March 29, 2007
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. -- The Tampa Bay Devil Rays have been hearing the same chorus for a few years now. If they could only get some pitching to go with that young offense, they'd have a chance to rise from the American League East cellar. That's conventional but incorrect wisdom, according to team management. "I think it is just the opposite. I think the pitching right now is ahead of the offense," Devil Rays second-year manager Joe Maddon said. "Everybody talks about the offense, and there is great potential there for the future.
SPORTS
By Rick Maese | March 28, 2007
Before last season, I asked a friend what was the deal with all the optimism surrounding the Orioles. "Around here," he said, "March is the only month worth having any optimism. We'll have the next six months to talk about how bad they are." Less than a week away from Opening Day, the Orioles will start the season still bearing strong resemblance to a fourth-place ballclub, albeit a better fourth-place team than last season. But the entire division is better, and I can't help but think the Orioles are closer to catching the Tampa Bay Devil Rays below them than the Toronto Blue Jays, Boston Red Sox and New York Yankees above them.
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