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By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | August 12, 1998
Gov. Parris N. Glendening has turned to the man credited with restoring the Naval Academy's reputation to perform what may be an even more difficult task: leading a task force charged with determining whether Maryland should reshuffle or break up its decade-old system for running its public colleges and universities.Retired Adm. Charles R. "Chuck" Larson, who left the academy and the Navy in June, said he's got "an open mind" on the fate of the University System of Maryland, which has been accused by critics of stifling the initiative of the schools it oversees.
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NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2005
HAGERSTOWN -- The University System of Maryland center here doesn't feel like a place of learning yet. Offices are empty, student lounges are bare and workers busily install light fixtures and projectors. When C. David Warner III walks through the halls, his footsteps echo. "I'm looking forward to having more people here," said Warner, the center's executive director. Warner's wish will come true tonight, when the long-awaited satellite branch of the state university system opens its doors.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2003
In an unusual challenge to the rising cost of higher education, seven University System of Maryland students sued yesterday to block a midyear tuition increase, alleging that it represents a violation of the contract between students and colleges. The class action lawsuit filed in Baltimore Circuit Court argues that students enrolled for the school year on the understanding they would be charged the fixed tuition rates that their universities had posted for both the fall and spring semester.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2002
In a decision with implications for state funding of Maryland's public campuses, the university system's Board of Regents has settled on Clifford M. Kendall, a retired businessman from Montgomery County, as its next chairman. Regents say they will ask Kendall, 71, the former chief executive officer of Computer Data Systems Inc., to accept the chairmanship at their meeting in Baltimore tomorrow. Kendall did not seek the position, but regents said he has indicated he will accept the offer.
NEWS
February 13, 2009
While Maryland's multiyear freeze on in-state tuition at its public colleges and universities has been of great benefit to students and their parents, it hasn't frozen costs entirely. The fastest-growing expense on campus these days isn't for room and board, it's textbooks. On average, Maryland undergraduates are paying as much as $1,000 each year for books and other course materials. The cost has been rising in double-digit increments in recent years - a much faster rate than for books in general.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | November 9, 2004
COLLEGE PARK - Holding candles and chanting "Save our school," nearly 1,000 students took part in a rally here last night asking Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. to include more funding for state public universities in his next budget. "We are here in the dark, we are here in the cold to plead with our governor to fund us correctly," Aaron Kraus, president of the student government, yelled to the crowd from a raised stage on McKeldin Mall at the center of the University of Maryland's flagship campus.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | October 10, 2002
The University System of Maryland, among the most expensive in the country for in-state students, is considering a major price restructuring that would include sharp tuition increases to offset flat state funding and to capitalize on the rising appeal of its campuses. In what officials are calling a shift in philosophy, large tuition increases - potentially 10 percent or more for Maryland residents and even higher for nonresidents - would be coupled with an expansion of need-based financial aid for low-income students.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2003
ADELPHI - The University System of Maryland will likely need hundreds of layoffs and a tuition increase higher than the 14 percent already planned for this fall to absorb an impending $50 million budget cut, system officials and college presidents said yesterday. In an unusually candid and sometimes tense meeting, the Board of Regents and university officials debated how to apportion the imminent cuts between layoffs and a further tuition increase. They also debated whether to spread the reductions equally among the system's 13 institutions or to spare some from the brunt.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells and Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
In the search for the next leader of the University System of Maryland, stakeholders are looking at a range of candidates, possibly a household name, a well-known CEO, a top government official - someone with star power. Someone like Freeman A. Hrabowski III, president of University of Maryland, Baltimore County, who has been profiled on "60 Minutes" and named among Time magazine's "Most Influential People in the World. " University officials approached Hrabowski early in the search, according to sources familiar with the process, though Hrabowski insists he is not interested in the job. As the search continues, a 10-member committee charged with finding the next chancellor is developing a list of candidates for review by the Board of Regents, which will make the final selection.
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | December 9, 2001
THE JOB of chancellor of the University System of Maryland always looked like an odd fit for anybody accustomed to being in charge -such as a governor like Parris N. Glendening, considered the leading candidate until he withdrew last week. On paper, it looks great - $340,000 a year and a wonderful mansion, Hidden Waters, on Old Court Road in Baltimore County. Its occupant gets to pontificate on issues of higher education while leading one of the hottest systems in the country. The University of Maryland, College Park is soaring in the rankings, and other campuses - particularly University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Salisbury University and several schools at the University of Maryland, Baltimore - attract favorable national publicity.
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