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By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
The University System of Maryland could expand its tuition remission program for the dependent children and spouses of employees. Under the current program, spouses and dependent children can attend the employee's college without paying any tuition. The spouse or dependent child can also get a 50 percent discount on college tuition at another college in the state system if the student is in an academic program not offered at the employee's institution. The proposed revision to the policy would eliminate the unique academic program requirement and allow the student to get 50 percent tuition remission at any university system college where they have been accepted.
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NEWS
September 29, 2014
Much has been written recently about the path forward for University of Maryland University College ( "UMUC should focus on education, not business," Sept. 18). Like many Marylanders, I have a vested interest in UMUC. My father attended the university while stationed in Frankfurt, Germany, in 1955. This past May, two of my sons graduated from UMUC. I am proud of them and proud of the education they received. The university serves a critical and growing constituency - working adults and military service members.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells | May 30, 2014
Amid a series of changes to federal laws regarding how universities handle sexual assaults and sexual misconduct, the University System of Maryland is in the process of updating its two-decade-old policies on the matter. The Board of Regents of the university system, which includes 11 of the state's public four-year universities, is set to discuss the proposed revisions at a committee meeting Tuesday. The proposal is still under discussion with various stakeholders, including college presidents and their legal counsel, and a final draft will be presented to the full board in late June.
NEWS
September 23, 2014
Bruce Hull and Maggie Cohen got it absolutely right in their September 18th commentary ( "UMUC should focus on education, not business" ). What they wrote is sad but true concerning the university where I taught for 20 years until late July. We faculty saw the deterioration in standards starting when former UMUC President Gerald Heeger tinkered with a plan to turn the university into a for-profit enterprise. That tinkering led to a long slow slide. Rather than fighting for student numbers by cutting costs, it should have done so by continuing to offer top-quality education.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2013
Maryland's in-state undergraduates will pay a few hundred dollars more per semester this fall under a new tuition-and-fee plan approved Wednesday by the university system's Board of Regents. Out-of-state students will be hit a little harder, paying as much as $1,060 more, for example, at the University of Maryland, College Park. The plan marks the fourth year that tuition for resident undergraduates at most Maryland schools has gone up 3 percent — an increase characterized by university system officials as moderate and lower than many states.
NEWS
July 16, 2014
As reported in your article of July 10 ( "UMUC considering plan to become independent non-profit with ties to university system" ), I have initiated a global community dialogue on a report from a volunteer team of outside business leaders that recommended changes to our business model in response to the revolutionary transformation taking place in online higher education. But let me make clear to your readers what I told our faculty and staff at a global town hall on July 10: •UMUC will not become a for-profit entity; •UMUC will not leave the University System of Maryland; •Our public mission, enshrined in state statute to be Maryland's open-access university providing quality and affordable higher education to adult learners across the state, will not change; •No recommendation will be put forth to the chancellor and the Board of Regents for consideration until leadership has an opportunity to evaluate input from our community.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells and Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2014
William E. Kirwan, who as chancellor of the University System of Maryland over the past dozen years helped oversee the rise of several of the state's public universities to national prominence, will step down from his position as soon as a successor is found, he said Tuesday. Kirwan, 76, a gregarious leader who maintained good relations with state officials, university presidents, members of the Board of Regents, faculty, business leaders and students, said he hopes to remain active in higher education with work on expanding access for low-income students.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2014
Enrollment at the University System of Maryland is expected to decline in the coming academic year and the following year, the first projected drop since the 1990s. More than 153,000 graduate and undergraduate students enrolled in fall 2013 at the state's public college system, but officials don't expect to surpass that number again until 2016. USM officials believe the colleges are still on track for longer-term growth, however. Much of the decline expected this coming fall is driven by a 6.5 percent expected drop at the University of Maryland, University College, which offers online and continuing education courses.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
The University of Maryland University College, which has been struggling with declining enrollment, is considering severing some ties with the state university system to avoid burdensome regulations and work more closely with the private sector. Under the proposal, the university would become an independent nonprofit organization that retains an affiliation with the state system. The school's president, Javier Miyares, said during a Thursday town hall meeting in Largo that the idea came from a task force of experts organized by the university as a response to a shrinking student body.
BUSINESS
By Jeff Barker and Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2012
While questions about the University of Maryland's decision to join the Big Ten seemed to dissipate when school leaders explained the financial benefits of the move, doubts about the process used to reach the conclusion linger. Before entering into serious talks with the Big Ten, Maryland President Wallace D. Loh signed a nondisclosure agreement pledging to keep details out of public view. Such agreements are not uncommon when schools' negotiations with conferences involve sensitive financial information.
NEWS
By Bruce Hull and Maggie Cohen | September 18, 2014
The University of Maryland University College (UMUC) is in crisis with declining student numbers. The challenge has accelerated in the last few years, and enrollments are projected to drop another 6.5 percent this fall, greatly due to competition from "for-profit" universities and a loss of military students. Unfortunately, UMUC's long term response to this challenge has led the institution to weaken its educational standards and imitate for-profit rivals. This is seen in UMUC's 5-year campaign to make student work less costly and less difficult, reducing the distance learning term from 12 to eight weeks, jettisoning peer-reviewed textbooks in favor of a hodgepodge of Internet resources, abolishing proctored exams, allowing substantially more credits to be earned through demonstrated student "competencies," promoting classroom credit for student "life experiences," and replacing final exams with "class projects.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | September 11, 2014
The University System of Maryland Board of Regents voted Thursday to sell the vacant and deteriorated former Hebrew Orphan Asylum in West Baltimore to the Coppin Heights Community Development Corp. for redevelopment as a community health center, according to a university spokesman. The land is currently owned by Coppin State University, which acquired it as part of a 7.3-acre, $680,000 purchase from the Lutheran Home and Hospital Foundation Inc. in 2003. The chancellor recommended that the board allow Coppin State University to move forward with sale of the property.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
Jasmine White was accepted to Morgan State University, her dream college, almost 10 years ago. But the New Yorker discovered she could not afford the out-of-state tuition. "I just started crying because I had no idea where I was going to get [the money] before class started," White recalled. Instead of coming to Baltimore, she earned an associate's degree at a community college in New York, and served five years in the Army Reserve. Now 26, she is finally enrolling at Morgan State this fall.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
Seven years after the University of Baltimore admitted its first freshman class, new President Kurt L. Schmoke is considering a return to the school's roots as an upper-division college that enrolled only juniors and seniors. The enrollment growth that came with the first underclassmen in 2007 has stagnated. UB enrolls about 200 freshmen each fall, and the university still attracts mostly transfers and graduate students. In an interview Friday, Schmoke spoke of flat public funding and a need to work more efficiently.
NEWS
Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
University System of Maryland schools have had mixed success in improving the graduation rates of minority and low-income students, according to an annual progress report released this week. Some colleges, including the University of Maryland, College Park and the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, have been able to boost minority and low-income achievement. But at other schools, the gaps between those students and middle-class whites have increased in recent years. "I was shocked to see the numbers," said Frank M. Reid III, a university system regent and pastor of Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
The University System of Maryland could expand its tuition remission program for the dependent children and spouses of employees. Under the current program, spouses and dependent children can attend the employee's college without paying any tuition. The spouse or dependent child can also get a 50 percent discount on college tuition at another college in the state system if the student is in an academic program not offered at the employee's institution. The proposed revision to the policy would eliminate the unique academic program requirement and allow the student to get 50 percent tuition remission at any university system college where they have been accepted.
NEWS
By Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr | August 31, 1998
MARYLAND'S STUDENTS, their parents and all Maryland taxpayers should have the full story on the success (or lack thereof) of the operation of the University System of Maryland (USM).Many concerns have been raised regarding whether the current University System, established 10 years ago, is operating in the best interest of students or Maryland's institutions of higher education. As a result, the General Assembly has adopted legislation to establish a task force to study the governance, coordination and funding of the system.
NEWS
By KARA WEDEKIND and KARA WEDEKIND,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | January 27, 2006
The University System of Maryland could better manage increasing energy costs by signing long-term contracts with providers, a Board of Regents panel is recommending. "We have a huge problem with rising energy costs, just as homeowners and businesses do," said regent James C. Rosapepe, a member of the finance committee. The committee will recommend that the full board allow the largest institution in the system, the University of Maryland, College Park, to seek out natural gas contracts that could affect all university system institutions.
NEWS
August 28, 2014
A lesson that has been learned during my 80-plus years of reading The Sun is that berating an editorial is more therapeutic than productive. Nevertheless, it is incomprehensible why even the revolting title of the "Draft Freeman" (Aug. 22) editorial was published inasmuch as the body of the piece failed to provide any logical basis for your view that you, or anyone else, should have the right to condemn or override a decision made by Freeman A. Hrabowski III not to become chancellor of the University System of Maryland.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells and Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
In the search for the next leader of the University System of Maryland, stakeholders are looking at a range of candidates, possibly a household name, a well-known CEO, a top government official - someone with star power. Someone like Freeman A. Hrabowski III, president of University of Maryland, Baltimore County, who has been profiled on "60 Minutes" and named among Time magazine's "Most Influential People in the World. " University officials approached Hrabowski early in the search, according to sources familiar with the process, though Hrabowski insists he is not interested in the job. As the search continues, a 10-member committee charged with finding the next chancellor is developing a list of candidates for review by the Board of Regents, which will make the final selection.
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