Advertisement
HomeCollectionsUniversity Officials
IN THE NEWS

University Officials

NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | May 20, 1997
Towson State University's ambitious 10-year master plan, which includes the possible acquisition of several nearby apartment complexes, has alarmed tenants who fear they may lose their homes.To quiet the furor, university officials are trying to reassure the neighbors, many of whom are elderly, that the expansion won't have an immediate impact -- and might never occur. President Hoke Smith called the plan "a wish list," and said the campus has enough space to build new dormitories.But that hasn't stopped the criticism.
Advertisement
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2005
A former aide to state Sen. Richard F. Colburn has sent a complaint to the General Assembly's Joint Committee on Legislative Ethics, asking for an investigation into the aide's allegations that he was required to write academic papers and conduct other personal tasks for the senator as part of his job. Gregory A. Dukes, who resigned from Colburn's staff in December, said he made the request after learning that the ethics committee had no plans to act...
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | November 11, 1998
Towson University and Maryland Stadium Authority officials unveiled plans yesterday for a $28 million expansion to the university's football stadium that would double the facility's seating.Calling the upgraded stadium a "regional sports complex," officials said the proposed 11,000-seat facility would house five of the university's athletic programs as well as provide a location for high school tournaments and community events.Towson residents, however, worried about traffic and noise from the stadium, were reserving judgment on the proposal until they could hear more details.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | May 28, 2000
Johns Hopkins University officials and students broke ground Friday on a comprehensive landscaping project that will reconfigure the grounds and walkways of the 24-acre North Baltimore campus. Asphalt will be replaced on quadrangles and walkways with bricks, granite and marble, giving public spaces a stately appearance more in keeping with the campus' architecture, university officials said. In addition, they said, two campus entrances will be enhanced, scores of trees will be planted, and lights and benches will be added.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2000
Negotiations to end the 2-week-old "living wage" sit-in at the Johns Hopkins University's administration building might begin this week. University officials say talks may happen because protesters have softened their position. "Before, they were saying that before we could even begin to talk, we would have to capitulate to their position," said school spokesman Dennis O'Shea. "Now that might not be the case." David Snyder, of the Student Labor Action Committee (SLAC), which is organizing the protest, said the administration has misinterpreted the group's position.
NEWS
May 11, 1991
It is bad enough that a Towson State University football player is charged with attempting to murder a fellow student in a brawl after an off-campus party. But what about the seven friends who witnessed the brawl? After it was over, they reportedly placed the bloodied victim's limp body in the bed of a pickup truck. They then "voted" to take him to St. Joseph Hospital, where they told a receptionist they found the unconscious man lying on the side of the road.Ours is such a violent society that few things astound us any more.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | November 28, 1996
In one of the biggest land deals in Baltimore, the Johns Hopkins University won approval yesterday to buy the old Eastern High School building and within the next 20 years redevelop the unoccupied 26-acre site to include businesses, a private school and university offices.The action by the Board of Estimates was the last step in the $2.6 million land deal brokered by Baltimore Development Corp. officials. They have been in negotiations since July 1995, when the city selected the university to develop the site, which is across from Memorial Stadium.
NEWS
January 25, 1995
Officials of the University of Maryland College Park have devised what they call a temporary response to a federal appellate court's finding last fall that a UMCP blacks-only scholarship program is unconstitutional. By merging the race-based Benjamin Banneker program with the merit-based Francis Scott Key awards, university officials will abide by the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals' decision. Meantime, though, they have pledged to fight the ruling at the U.S. Supreme Court.We have suggested previously a Supreme Court hearing could give Maryland and other public schools guidance they need on what is and is not constitutional in affirmative action programs such as the Banneker scholarships.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | November 23, 2004
The University of Baltimore will not merge with another institution, but the school will consider admitting underclassmen and forming partnerships with other state schools to boost enrollment, officials said yesterday. UB was targeted in a recent university system cost-cutting report, which said that the 5,000-student school could make better use of its facilities. About 60 percent of the students take night courses, according to UB officials, meaning that many facilities are underused during the day. No merger planned Some regents have said they are willing to discuss merging the university with another institution, but Chancellor William E. Kirwan said yesterday that idea "has been taken off the table."
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2001
"The Beach" - the Johns Hopkins University's once-green front lawn known for sunbathing and studying - looks like a lunar landscape this summer. With the 4,000-plus undergraduates gone until Labor Day, university officials are overseeing an ambitious makeover of the campus grounds along North Charles Street. "We timed this so we wouldn't have to take [students'] recreation away," said Stephen M. Campbell, the university's director of planning and project development. Pointing to construction crews laying brick and arranging granite yesterday, Campbell said, "These guys move at a rapid clip.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.