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By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | February 4, 2009
Towson University officials have offered representatives of the Rodgers Forge community several alternative sites for a proposed $45 million sports arena on the campus, all of them adjacent to the current arena. While the residents said none of the options presented at a meeting Monday night was satisfactory, they agreed to continue discussions next week. "It was a good first step, but we need to continue to talk until the university understands the residents' point of view," Patrick Foretich, a Rodgers Forge resident, said yesterday.
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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | January 8, 1999
A state audit faults Morgan State University for not keeping tabs on its multimillion-dollar art collection, saying the institution lacks sufficient documentation on the location of its artwork.The university's James E. Lewis Museum of Art, renowned for an extensive African-American collection, closed abruptly for two weeks last year while university officials investigated allegations of security and management problems there.The facility has since reopened. Its director, Gabriel S. Tenabe, who was reassigned for several weeks during the internal inquiry, has returned to his duties, according to university officials.
NEWS
By Robert Becker and Robert Becker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 23, 2003
CHICAGO -- The computer system intended to track international students as part of the nation's stepped-up security routinely loses sensitive information about foreign students and faculty, according to university officials throughout the country. Gaffes in the $36 million Student and Exchange Visitor Information System -- or SEVIS -- have also left schools unable to print documents that international students and visiting scholars need to obtain visas, delaying their entry into the country.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Sun Staff Writer | April 28, 1994
The Johns Hopkins University, despite prodding from black students, has ruled out the creation of a black studies department, college officials said yesterday.The university instead will set up a major in comparative cultural studies that draws on courses from several disciplines.A black studies department was among black students' demands in a list of grievances presented to the university in the summer of 1992.University officials said yesterday that a free-standing black studies department would be too small and would lack political influence, making it vulnerable to budget cuts.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | May 16, 1997
State and federal authorities are investigating the apparent theft of more than $100,000 worth of goods and services at the University of Maryland Baltimore County, sources said yesterday.The investigation is centered on a former UMBC employee who left the university after the apparent thefts were discovered last summer, officials said.They declined to identify the former employee or say whether the person quit or was fired.The university referred the matter to the state attorney general's office for criminal investigation after a supervisor detected evidence of theft, officials said.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2005
A former aide to state Sen. Richard F. Colburn has sent a complaint to the General Assembly's Joint Committee on Legislative Ethics, asking for an investigation into the aide's allegations that he was required to write academic papers and conduct other personal tasks for the senator as part of his job. Gregory A. Dukes, who resigned from Colburn's staff in December, said he made the request after learning that the ethics committee had no plans to act...
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | November 11, 1998
Towson University and Maryland Stadium Authority officials unveiled plans yesterday for a $28 million expansion to the university's football stadium that would double the facility's seating.Calling the upgraded stadium a "regional sports complex," officials said the proposed 11,000-seat facility would house five of the university's athletic programs as well as provide a location for high school tournaments and community events.Towson residents, however, worried about traffic and noise from the stadium, were reserving judgment on the proposal until they could hear more details.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | May 20, 1997
Towson State University's ambitious 10-year master plan, which includes the possible acquisition of several nearby apartment complexes, has alarmed tenants who fear they may lose their homes.To quiet the furor, university officials are trying to reassure the neighbors, many of whom are elderly, that the expansion won't have an immediate impact -- and might never occur. President Hoke Smith called the plan "a wish list," and said the campus has enough space to build new dormitories.But that hasn't stopped the criticism.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | May 28, 2000
Johns Hopkins University officials and students broke ground Friday on a comprehensive landscaping project that will reconfigure the grounds and walkways of the 24-acre North Baltimore campus. Asphalt will be replaced on quadrangles and walkways with bricks, granite and marble, giving public spaces a stately appearance more in keeping with the campus' architecture, university officials said. In addition, they said, two campus entrances will be enhanced, scores of trees will be planted, and lights and benches will be added.
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