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November 7, 2005
Barbara Hulfish, a neurologist on the faculty of the University of Maryland School of Medicine for about 30 years, died of cancer Oct. 31 at a Baltimore nursing home. She was 82 and had lived in Baltimore. Born in Alexandria, Va., Dr. Hulfish graduated from American University in 1944 and the University of Rochester (N.Y.) School of Medicine in 1952. She came to Baltimore in 1957 to finish her postgraduate work at the Johns Hopkins University. A year later, Dr. Hulfish joined the faculty of the University of Maryland, where she held joint appointments in the neurology and psychiatry departments until the 1980s.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
The president of the University of Maryland, Baltimore campus said he is "deeply disturbed" by two crimes reported against members of the campus community Monday night and will hold a public safety town hall next week. The incidents -- a robbery of a nursing student and an attempted robbery of a hospital employee -- have prompted campus police to add additional police and security officers, who will wear reflective vests on foot or on Segways, President Jay A. Perman said in an e-mail to employees and students.
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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 17, 1998
The University of Maryland's $32 million Health Sciences and Human Services Library will be dedicated in a ceremony at 1: 30 p.m. today at the southwest corner of Lombard and Greene streets downtown.The event marks the grand opening of the 190,000-square-foot building, which ranks second in size only to Harvard University's among medical libraries on the East Coast.Tours will be given afterward.Pub Date: 9/17/98
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
When the writer Peter Mehlman was working on the television show "Seinfeld," he could be counted on to come up with the tiniest, most insignificant - and ultimately, the most memorable - plots. It was Mehlman, now 58 and a Los Angeles resident, who explored snack-eating etiquette at parties, and Mehlman who decided that the show's female lead, Elaine, would hoard contraceptive sponges. And it was Mehlman who coined several catchphrases that have entered the cultural lexicon, from "yada yada" to gloss over a conversation, "sponge-worthy" to describe a hot date and "double-dipping" to refer to the practice of dunking a snack into a sauce at a party, taking a bite and then dunking it again into the same container.
NEWS
March 17, 1999
Linnea Pagulayan of Westminster has been named to the dean's list at the University of Maryland, College Park for the fall 1998 semester.To be eligible for the list, students must attain a 3.5 grade point average or higher.She is a student in the college of behavioral and social sciences.Pagulayan is a 1997 graduate of Westminster High School.PoliceWestminster: An employee at Lee Weller Auto Sales on Tuc Road told police Sunday that a salt thrower was stolen from the rear of his truck while it was parked at the rear of the business.
NEWS
June 2, 2003
Edith Joan Hunt, a professor at the University of Maryland, College Park, died Wednesday of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Towson resident was 70. A lifelong educator, she taught in the Department of Human Development and Institute for Child Study at the University of Maryland for nearly three decades until her retirement in 1992. Family and school conflict resolution were among her specialties. Born in Pomona, Calif., she graduated from the University of Redlands in 1954 and earned a master's degree from Claremont Graduate University in 1963.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,Sun Staff Writer | December 10, 1994
The University of Maryland Board of Regents voted yesterday to lift its four-year ban on investing in companies operating in South Africa. The unanimous vote quietly extinguished in Maryland an issue that once seared American campuses.The vote, taken at a session at Towson State University, follows a national trend setting aside such restrictions after South Africa dismantled its white authoritarian government last spring.The Johns Hopkins University and the city of Baltimore, for example, dropped similar policies earlier this year.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | August 21, 2000
Walter V. Hohenstein, a University of Maryland administrator whose academic career took him overseas before he returned to a top post at College Park, died of cancer Wednesday at his University Park home. He was 72. For 16 years before his retirement in 1988, Mr. Hohenstein served as director of articulation for the University of Maryland's central administration, coordinating transfers and other activities among five university campuses and 17 community colleges. Mr. Hohenstein handled negotiations between professors at various schools, ensuring that students could receive credit for completed courses when they transferred from a junior college to a university.
NEWS
By Frank Roylance and Stephen Kiehl and Frank Roylance and Stephen Kiehl and,frank.roylance@baltsun.com and stephen.kiehl@baltsun.com | December 17, 2008
Stem cell research pioneer Dr. Curt I. Civin has been named to lead the new Center for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. The move ends Civin's 30-year career at the Johns Hopkins University's medical school. He takes with him 15 of his postdoctoral fellows and $21.5 million in research funding. Civin's work at Hopkins led in 1984 to the discovery of a key technology for isolating stem cells from other blood cells, critical for study and transplantation into patients.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 8, 1998
Dr. George Herschel Yeager, a vascular surgeon and administrator who "fixed bodies as well as hospitals," died of complications from a stroke Sunday at the University of Maryland Medical Center. He was 92 and lived in Catonsville.Dr. Yeager's association with the University of Maryland began in medical school in 1927 and ended in 1973, when he retired as a professor of clinical surgery."He was a giant and one of the great figures of the University of Maryland School of Medicine," Dr. Joseph McLaughlin, a professor of surgery at UM's medical school, said yesterday.
NEWS
By Bruce Hull and Maggie Cohen | September 18, 2014
The University of Maryland University College (UMUC) is in crisis with declining student numbers. The challenge has accelerated in the last few years, and enrollments are projected to drop another 6.5 percent this fall, greatly due to competition from "for-profit" universities and a loss of military students. Unfortunately, UMUC's long term response to this challenge has led the institution to weaken its educational standards and imitate for-profit rivals. This is seen in UMUC's 5-year campaign to make student work less costly and less difficult, reducing the distance learning term from 12 to eight weeks, jettisoning peer-reviewed textbooks in favor of a hodgepodge of Internet resources, abolishing proctored exams, allowing substantially more credits to be earned through demonstrated student "competencies," promoting classroom credit for student "life experiences," and replacing final exams with "class projects.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
Under Armour will continue to supply uniforms to the University of Maryland's varsity teams under a 10-year extension deal announced Tuesday. The Baltimore-based sports brand will continue to design and supply game-day uniforms as well as footwear, apparel and equipment for training for all men's and women's varsity teams. "The University of Maryland is an integral part of Under Armour's history, culture and identity," Matt Mirchin, Under Armour's executive vice president of global marketing, said in the company's announcement.
HEALTH
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2014
A white powdered chemical compound emerged from two University of Maryland School of Medicine laboratories more than 10 years ago with a name destined for oblivion, but a future that now looks promising as a treatment for the most challenging cases of prostate cancer. Today, VN/124-1 is a drug candidate with a name - galeterone - a pharmaceutical company founded on its potential and a record of strong preliminary results in clinical trials with human patients. The Food and Drug Administration has put galeterone on a fast track for approval to treat prostate cancer, which kills about 30,000 men a year in the United States.
NEWS
August 28, 2014
To those who follow college athletics only casually, the announcement last week that the University of Maryland will henceforth award athletic scholarships on a multi-year basis instead of year-to-year may sound like a minor change. But in fact, it's a major reform that is not only welcome but is likely to attract a legion of imitators. From the effort to unionize athletes at Northwestern University as school employees (a year-long struggle that remains ongoing) to the legal fight over whether the NCAA can profit from the images of athletes in video games and elsewhere without compensating them, how colleges and universities treat athletes — or mistreat them — has sparked a pitched battle of late.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells and Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
In the search for the next leader of the University System of Maryland, stakeholders are looking at a range of candidates, possibly a household name, a well-known CEO, a top government official - someone with star power. Someone like Freeman A. Hrabowski III, president of University of Maryland, Baltimore County, who has been profiled on "60 Minutes" and named among Time magazine's "Most Influential People in the World. " University officials approached Hrabowski early in the search, according to sources familiar with the process, though Hrabowski insists he is not interested in the job. As the search continues, a 10-member committee charged with finding the next chancellor is developing a list of candidates for review by the Board of Regents, which will make the final selection.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | August 11, 2014
Maryland added its 10 th hospital-based domestic violence program at the University of Maryland Medical Center , officials announced Monday. The Bridge Project at UMMC was launched with a $50,000 grant from the Governor's Office of Crime Control and Prevention and a $20,000 grant from Verizon . The program will serve patients at both the University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center and the UMMC Emergency Department. Victims of domestic violence will be able to get crisis counseling, safety planning, referrals and follow-up services around the clock.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | October 31, 2004
Marshall L. Rennels, a retired University of Maryland medical school research scientist and professor, died of cancer yesterday at his home in Elkridge. He was 65. Dr. Rennels, who devoted most of his career to the study of the brain, showed through his groundbreaking research how the body used the pulsation of arteries to force spinal fluid through brain tissue. He served as acting chairman of the university's anatomy department and as director of the medical and doctorate programs until his retirement in 2002.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2014
University of Maryland officials on Tuesday announced the launch of a new test site to study how drones may coexist with jets, helicopters and other air traffic in U.S. airspace. The long-planned site is to be based near Naval Air Station Patuxent River in Southern Maryland, long a key research site for the Navy. It will be managed by the A. James Clark School of Engineering at College Park. "With [Pax River] serving as a premier facility for research, development, testing, and evaluation, our region is already a hub for aviation innovation," Rep. Steny Hoyer, whose district includes the university and the test site, said in a statement.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
Laurel A. Oleynick, a former X-ray technician and longtime volunteer, died Tuesday of complications from a stroke at the Loch Raven VA Community Living & Rehabilitation Center in Northeast Baltimore. She was 82. The daughter of Byron Coggins, a postal worker, and Estelle Coggins, a homemaker, Laurel Adele Coggins was born and raised on Nantucket. After graduating from Nantucket High School in 1949, she enlisted in the Air Force and served for seven years as a technician with the Strategic Air Command.
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