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NEWS
August 14, 2002
Eugene Odum, 88, a former University of Georgia professor who helped advance the science of ecology and the concept of an integrated ecosystem, died Saturday at his Athens, Ga., home.
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NEWS
January 30, 2005
William Augustus Bootle, 102, a retired federal district judge who issued a string of historic civil rights rulings in the 1960s, including the 1961 order allowing blacks to enter the University of Georgia, died Tuesday in Macon, Ga. He suffered from heart problems. Among his rulings were ones integrating buses and school systems and ensuring blacks' places on voter rolls. Macon's federal courthouse was named for him in 1998. He signed the University of Georgia order after a weeklong trial that pitted black students Charlayne Hunter and Hamilton Holmes Jr. against the school's leaders.
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NEWS
August 1, 2003
JOHN D HATFIELD, Executive Vice President and Provost at the University of New Haven in West Haven, CT, died at his home in Wallingford on Wednesday, July 30. He was 59. The cause of death was non-Hodgkins lymphoma. Born in Columbus, OH, Mr. Hatfield spent his childhood in Crestline, OH. In 1959 his family moved to Warner Robins, GA. Mr. Hatfield earned his B.A. at Mercer University in Macon, GA, his M.A. at the University of Georgia and his Ph.D. at Purdue University in West Lafayette, IN. Prior to joining the University of New Haven in July, 2001, he was Dean of the Merrick School of Business at the University of Baltimore, Associate Dean at the College of Business Administration at the University of Central Florida and Director of Graduate Programs in the Management Department at the College of Business Administration at the University of Georgia.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2004
The question this week about Quincy Carter is the same as it has been throughout his NFL career: Which Carter will show up? The mobile one with the strong arm, or the one who makes poor decisions and throws interceptions? No one knows for sure, not even Carter's newest team, the New York Jets (6-2), or the Ravens (5-3), the team they'll play host to on Sunday. Carter, 27, has been forced into the starting role because Chad Pennington suffered a strained rotator cuff in his right shoulder last Sunday against the Buffalo Bills.
NEWS
October 28, 1995
Hamilton Holmes, 54, one of the two black students who integrated the University of Georgia in the early 1960s, died yesterday in Atlanta.Dr. Holmes, who was chief of orthopedic surgery at Grady Memorial Hospital in Atlanta and a professor of medicine at Atlanta's Emory University, had a history of heart problems. He died of natural causes Thursday afternoon at his home, hospital officials said.In 1961, Dr. Holmes and Charlayne Hunter won a place in the history of the U.S. civil rights movement by becoming the first black students to enroll in the University of Georgia, located in Athens.
FEATURES
November 18, 1998
Meet Terrell DavisDenver Bronco running back Terrell Davis ran for three touchdowns in the 1998 Super Bowl and was the game's Most Valuable Player."Terrell is a great runner," says New York Jet running back Curtis Martin. "He can run over tacklers."Terrell graduated from the University of Georgia. The Broncos picked him in the sixth round of the 1995 NFL draft. Terrell soon made other teams sorry they skipped him in the draft! We asked Cammi Granato what sport she can't playThere is no way I'd be able to figure skate.
NEWS
January 30, 2005
William Augustus Bootle, 102, a retired federal district judge who issued a string of historic civil rights rulings in the 1960s, including the 1961 order allowing blacks to enter the University of Georgia, died Tuesday in Macon, Ga. He suffered from heart problems. Among his rulings were ones integrating buses and school systems and ensuring blacks' places on voter rolls. Macon's federal courthouse was named for him in 1998. He signed the University of Georgia order after a weeklong trial that pitted black students Charlayne Hunter and Hamilton Holmes Jr. against the school's leaders.
NEWS
May 8, 2000
Ismael C. Meer, 82, a veteran anti-apartheid activist and longtime friend of former President Nelson Mandela, died in his sleep in Durban, South Africa. He was a leading figure in the South African Indian Congress and served on the African National Congress and the South African Indian Congress. He began his long struggle against apartheid in 1934. Throughout his life, he was repeatedly detained without trial, banned from speaking publicly, listed as a communist and targeted for terror attacks on his home.
NEWS
By Lloyd George Parry and Lloyd George Parry,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 14, 1997
"Blind Vengeance," by Ray Jenkins University of Georgia Press. 338 pages. $29.95.In the Atlanta of my youth, there was a barbershop near home operated by four rednecks. They employed a shoeshiner named Roscoe, a black man who appeared to be in his late 60s. With your haircut you got a free floor show which consisted of the barbers taunting Roscoe and subjecting him to a level of humiliation that would have driven Job to go postal. But Roscoe just took it silently and did his job. And in all the years that I went to that barbershop, I never once had the courage to tell those nitwits to leave him alone.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | December 29, 1992
Perhaps it is only fitting that when Charlayne Hunter-Gault decided to finally sing her song, she would first celebrate it where the melody began.So her book tour started in the South, where her family's roots run deep; in Georgia, where she spent her youth; in Athens, Ga., xTC where she broke the lock of segregation.There, in 1961, Ms. Hunter-Gault and Hamilton Holmes walked onto a college campus and into history as the first African-Americans to attend the University of Georgia. And there, 27 years later, after returning to make history again, Ms. Hunter-Gault says she decided to write her memoir.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | November 26, 2003
Hugh Kenner, a former English professor at the Johns Hopkins University who was also a critic and celebrated scholar who wrote on James Joyce and Ezra Pound among other literary figures, died of a heart ailment Monday at his home in Athens, Ga. He was 80. Dr. Kenner taught at Hopkins from 1973 until 1991, when he joined the faculty of the University of Georgia. A specialist in 20th-century literature, Dr. Kenner made his reputation with critical studies of Joyce, Pound, T.S. Eliot and W.B. Yeats.
NEWS
August 1, 2003
JOHN D HATFIELD, Executive Vice President and Provost at the University of New Haven in West Haven, CT, died at his home in Wallingford on Wednesday, July 30. He was 59. The cause of death was non-Hodgkins lymphoma. Born in Columbus, OH, Mr. Hatfield spent his childhood in Crestline, OH. In 1959 his family moved to Warner Robins, GA. Mr. Hatfield earned his B.A. at Mercer University in Macon, GA, his M.A. at the University of Georgia and his Ph.D. at Purdue University in West Lafayette, IN. Prior to joining the University of New Haven in July, 2001, he was Dean of the Merrick School of Business at the University of Baltimore, Associate Dean at the College of Business Administration at the University of Central Florida and Director of Graduate Programs in the Management Department at the College of Business Administration at the University of Georgia.
NEWS
August 14, 2002
Eugene Odum, 88, a former University of Georgia professor who helped advance the science of ecology and the concept of an integrated ecosystem, died Saturday at his Athens, Ga., home.
NEWS
By Thomas Healy and Thomas Healy,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 1, 2001
WASHINGTON - For 23 years, universities across the country that rely on affirmative action have been guided by a basic principle: So long as they do not set quotas, racial preferences may be used in admissions to ensure a diverse student body. The origin of that premise is a 1978 opinion by Supreme Court Justice Lewis F. Powell, which said that though set-asides are unconstitutional, schools may use race as a "plus factor" to achieve student diversity. What has long been a guiding principle, though, is increasingly under attack.
NEWS
May 8, 2000
Ismael C. Meer, 82, a veteran anti-apartheid activist and longtime friend of former President Nelson Mandela, died in his sleep in Durban, South Africa. He was a leading figure in the South African Indian Congress and served on the African National Congress and the South African Indian Congress. He began his long struggle against apartheid in 1934. Throughout his life, he was repeatedly detained without trial, banned from speaking publicly, listed as a communist and targeted for terror attacks on his home.
FEATURES
November 18, 1998
Meet Terrell DavisDenver Bronco running back Terrell Davis ran for three touchdowns in the 1998 Super Bowl and was the game's Most Valuable Player."Terrell is a great runner," says New York Jet running back Curtis Martin. "He can run over tacklers."Terrell graduated from the University of Georgia. The Broncos picked him in the sixth round of the 1995 NFL draft. Terrell soon made other teams sorry they skipped him in the draft! We asked Cammi Granato what sport she can't playThere is no way I'd be able to figure skate.
NEWS
July 24, 1995
Percy Humphrey, 90, who played trumpet regularly at the famed Preservation Hall in New Orleans until March and was the city's oldest active jazz musician, died Saturday of heart problems.The peak of his career came in the 1940s and 1950s, when he led the Eureka Brass Band, the premier marching band for parades and funerals."I loved hearing that trumpet soar on top of it," said jazz historian Dick Allen, who met Mr. Humphrey in 1946. "Percy never relied on cheap vaudeville tricks. . . . Percy always came up with something original."
NEWS
By Thomas Healy and Thomas Healy,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 1, 2001
WASHINGTON - For 23 years, universities across the country that rely on affirmative action have been guided by a basic principle: So long as they do not set quotas, racial preferences may be used in admissions to ensure a diverse student body. The origin of that premise is a 1978 opinion by Supreme Court Justice Lewis F. Powell, which said that though set-asides are unconstitutional, schools may use race as a "plus factor" to achieve student diversity. What has long been a guiding principle, though, is increasingly under attack.
NEWS
By Lloyd George Parry and Lloyd George Parry,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 14, 1997
"Blind Vengeance," by Ray Jenkins University of Georgia Press. 338 pages. $29.95.In the Atlanta of my youth, there was a barbershop near home operated by four rednecks. They employed a shoeshiner named Roscoe, a black man who appeared to be in his late 60s. With your haircut you got a free floor show which consisted of the barbers taunting Roscoe and subjecting him to a level of humiliation that would have driven Job to go postal. But Roscoe just took it silently and did his job. And in all the years that I went to that barbershop, I never once had the courage to tell those nitwits to leave him alone.
NEWS
October 28, 1995
Hamilton Holmes, 54, one of the two black students who integrated the University of Georgia in the early 1960s, died yesterday in Atlanta.Dr. Holmes, who was chief of orthopedic surgery at Grady Memorial Hospital in Atlanta and a professor of medicine at Atlanta's Emory University, had a history of heart problems. He died of natural causes Thursday afternoon at his home, hospital officials said.In 1961, Dr. Holmes and Charlayne Hunter won a place in the history of the U.S. civil rights movement by becoming the first black students to enroll in the University of Georgia, located in Athens.
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