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NEWS
By JANE M. ORIENT | February 28, 1993
Wouldn't it be wonderful to have all the medical care you needed or wanted, without ever worrying about the bill?And wouldn't it be wonderful to drive to work every day without ever paying a toll or stopping at the red light?The second question usually provokes much more critical thought than the first. Before people vote the money to build a freeway through their downtown, a lot of inconvenient objections are raised.The idea of "comprehensive health care reform" to "assure universal access" should stimulate the same thought process.
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NEWS
November 15, 1992
President-elect Clinton's vow to halve the deficit within fou years may yet prove to be as elusive a pledge as President Bush's promise of no new taxes. If the recession drags on as leading indicators suggest it will, there is almost no chance he will achieve that goal with the economic program he offered during the campaign. Indeed, Mr. Clinton's greatest nightmare might be a federal deficit doubling rather than halving this year's $290 billion figure in the fourth year of his term.Given this danger, the president-elect would be well advised to make an attack on the deficit his top priority in the revised budget he will offer in January for the 1994 fiscal year starting next October.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 9, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The nation has a severe shortage of general physicians and a surplus of specialists, a trend that must be reversed soon if major repairs are going to be made to the ailing health-care system, a federal advisory panel has warned in a report to be made public soon.The study is expected to be taken seriously by the Clinton administration, because it has set health-care reform as an early goal, because the head of the panel, Dr. David Satcher, is said to be on the short list for the job of secretary of health and human services in the new administration, and because Democrats and Republicans have indicated that health-care reform will be at the top of the priority list for Congress next year.
NEWS
September 14, 1991
Having exhausted other avenues, the Annapolis chapter of the Benevolent and Protective Order of the Elks is now prepared to challenge in court a newly-minted Annapolis law denying liquor licenses to private clubs with discriminatory bylaws. The suit asserts the city has stepped outside its authority in making liquor laws more restrictive than the state requires and that the law is unconstitutional because it excludes religious groups.This action seems predicated less on true conviction than pressing practicalities.
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