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NEWS
July 17, 2014
Thank you for the commentary regarding the challenge facing women in construction ( "Construction: a boy's club," July 14). I know about it from experience. From 2007 to mid-2008, I received scholarships and worker retraining at a technical school for building construction. Out of 100 students, I was one of four who achieved an associate of applied science degree during that time. I then received direct entry into the apprentice 3.5-year program to become a union carpenter. I was lucky to receive six months of work each year.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
Racial disparities in the restaurant labor force of BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport are hurting African-American employees and contributing to poverty in Baltimore, according to a study released Monday by the national labor organization Unite Here. Officials with AirMall USA, which subcontracts concessions operations at the airport for the Maryland Aviation Administration, rebutted the findings. The study, which Unite Here produced in collaboration with the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, found African-American employees disproportionately work in low-wage positions at fast-food chains and in the back of airport restaurants as dishwashers and cooks, while white employees tend to fill higher-paying, front-of-house jobs as bartenders and servers.
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NEWS
January 24, 2014
Thank you for the thoughtful editorial on the Supreme Court case of Harris v. Quinn ("Paying one's dues," Jan. 23). While it may seem reasonable to force people to pay union dues in order to engage in commerce, it might be more reasonable to consider the possibility that people should be free to engage in commerce on their own terms. Why did Illinois decide to treat these people as employees in the first place? After all, the doctors who receive Medicare funds are not state employees.
NEWS
July 17, 2014
Thank you for the commentary regarding the challenge facing women in construction ( "Construction: a boy's club," July 14). I know about it from experience. From 2007 to mid-2008, I received scholarships and worker retraining at a technical school for building construction. Out of 100 students, I was one of four who achieved an associate of applied science degree during that time. I then received direct entry into the apprentice 3.5-year program to become a union carpenter. I was lucky to receive six months of work each year.
NEWS
March 9, 2010
A bill that would require contractors doing business with the city to give preference to local union employees has been yanked by the city councilman who proposed it. Henry said he plans to change the wording of the bill after hearing from contractors who said they already hire locally but not from union halls. The bill was intended to boost employment by increasing job training and opportunities for city residents, Henry said. But it alarmed many contractors who saw it as a union power grab that would drive up wages.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly | dan.connolly@baltsun.com | March 26, 2010
Realignment in Major League Baseball, which could move the Orioles out of the American League East one day, was touched on Thursday during the players' annual spring meeting with their union chief. But because it is only conceptual, not a lot of time was dedicated to it, according to new union chief Michael Weiner , who spent nearly two hours with the Orioles. "On-field issues are very important to the players, so we mentioned a number of those issues. My understanding is that realignment is not a front-burner issue," said Weiner, the union's former general counsel who took over as executive director from Don Fehr last year.
NEWS
By Harold Scott | April 7, 2010
Councilman Bill Henry's proposal to exclude non-union laborers from working on city-funded construction projects is already causing great concern among the small business community, particularly for those of us whose companies are black or minority owned. Mr. Henry introduced a bill March 22 that calls for mandatory community partnership agreements (more commonly called project labor agreements or PLAs) on all taxpayer-supported city construction projects of more than $5 million.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2012
The International Longshoremen's Association and the U.S. Maritime Alliance have agreed to meet with a federal mediator before the expiration of the contract extension at midnight on Dec. 29. Talks between the union representing nearly 15,000 dockworkers from Maine to Texas and the alliance representing shipping companies and port operators, stalled last week as both sides traded accusations. The union represents about 1,400 Baltimore longshoremen. The major sticking point is a container royalty payment made to the union and its members based on the weight of cargo.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2013
Baltimore County sheriff's deputies are the latest group of employees to reach a three-year labor agreement with the county. County officials said Wednesday that members of the Fraternal Order of Police Lodge No. 25 approved a contract similar to those other unions in the county have approved in recent weeks. The deal guarantees no furloughs or layoffs through 2016, and provides a 3 percent bonus in 2014, as well as a 3 percent cost-of-living allowance in 2015. The union represents 75 employees.
NEWS
By By Mary Gail Hare | The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2010
The union that represents 1,700 Baltimore County employees in corrections, the 911 center, sanitation and animal control has ratified a new contract that includes a 2 percent raise but leaves a dispute over emergency leave unresolved. "Members decided to ratify the contract and get the raise," said John Ripley, president of the Baltimore Federation of Public Employees. "The impasse we have been fighting for 18 months will just be taken up with the next administration. We are not happy with this administration."
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
Howard school officials will begin mediation with the county teachers union Wednesday, the latest step in contentious contract negotiations that lasted throughout the school year. The Howard County Education Association declared an impasse last month after failing to reach agreements with the school system on such matters as salary increases, step implementation and the duration of the agreement. "We're optimistic about the mediation session, and we hope it results in a settlement as soon as possible," said union President Paul Lemle.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
Baltimore's police and fire unions are fighting a new proposal from Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake to privatize part of the pensions of new employees — a move union officials argue will make it harder to recruit and retain the best young officers. City finance officials say the privatization plan is the latest step needed to save the Fire and Police Employees' Retirement System, which they say is struggling and carries a $765 million unfunded liability. But union officials say the threat of pension collapse is overblown, and maintain that weaker benefits will cause talented recruits to go elsewhere.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
After months of negotiations, one strike and the threat of another, and intervention from the governor, Johns Hopkins Hospital and 2,000 service workers reached a tentative labor agreement early Tuesday that some said could become an "important benchmark" for the health care industry. The deal, which is to be submitted to the workers for a vote, came after seven hours of negotiations that ended at 2 a.m. It would affect housekeepers, cooks, janitors, surgical technicians and others.
NEWS
July 8, 2014
As a former teacher and as a teacher educator who has observed classrooms in almost every school system in Maryland, I feel I'm qualified to make the following comments, even though negativity toward Howard County Public School System and its teachers is considered blasphemous by some. The fact that the Howard County Education Association is holding out for a two-year raise of 4 percent plus a step increase appears greedy, manipulative and rather like blackmail in an election year ( "Howard teacher talks at impasse," July 7)
NEWS
July 6, 2014
Public unions are at risk because union management is really answering to the Democratic Party and not its own members ( "Public unions at risk," June 30). Charging outrageous fees to members to pay union leaders high salaries and donating many dollars to Democratic Party causes does not help union members one bit. Lyle Rescott, Marriottsville - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
SPORTS
By Terry Foy and Inside Lacrosse | July 2, 2014
It was a tumultuous spring off the field for the NCAA, and the effect could change college lacrosse in substantial ways. The consensus to this point, however, is that there's still so much to be determined that it's impossible to project how lacrosse fans should ready themselves for the future. How this future looks could hinge on the development of two major storylines that might reshape college athletics: In late March, a National Labor Relations Board regional director decided that members of the Northwestern football team were, based on the nature of their work (playing a sport)
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2014
Bus drivers, dispatchers and other public transit employees in Baltimore will vote for a new local union president next week, following the ouster of their elected president by national union officials. Union officials said Janice Murray was removed as president of the 2,600-member Amalgamated Transit Union Local 1300 because she owed the organization $200 in travel expenses from six years ago. Murray's victory was appealed by a rival candidate, the local's former president, who said unpaid travel expenses invalidated her candidacy.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown | January 24, 2012
Reps. Roscoe G. Bartlett and Chris Van Hollen are planning to take service members past and present to President Barack Obama's State of the Union Address Tuesday evening. Bartlett, a Western Maryland Republican, and Van Hollen, a Montgomery County Democrat, are among some two dozen lawmakers participating in the bipartisan effort organized by the House Committee on Veterans' Affairs and the House National Guard and Reserve Components Caucus to help focus attention on veterans' needs.
NEWS
June 30, 2014
The Supreme Court didn't kill a key underpinning of public sector unionism Monday, but it surely put it on life support. The court's ruling in the Illinois case Harris v. Quinn, which related to the mandatory collection of so-called "fair share" fees from home health care workers whose wages are negotiated by a union whether those workers choose to belong to the union or not, was a relatively narrow one. It turned on the court's decision to draw a...
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2014
After years of holding schools accountable for student test scores, the idea of using those scores to evaluate teachers and determine their pay has become the latest battleground in education across the nation. This past school year, Maryland's 60,000 teachers were evaluated for the first time according to a formula that required half of their final rating to be based on how much their students learned. Policymakers and proponents of the new evaluation systems hope that eventually they can be used to get rid of poorly performing teachers and reward the best with higher pay. But teachers unions contend that further emphasis on test scores narrows the focus of learning and that effectiveness in the classroom is more complex than a score.
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