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NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Washington Bureau | December 15, 1993
WASHINGTON -- A new study shows that the number of Americans lacking health insurance is rising every year and may now exceed 39 million -- a number immediately seized on by Clinton administration officials as evidence of the need for health care reform.The number of uninsured Americans under 65 -- the age when they become eligible for federally subsidized Medicare coverage -- rose from 36.3 million in 1991 to 38.5 million last year -- an increase of 2.2 million, according to the study released yesterday by the Employee Benefit Research Institute, a respected non-partisan organization in Washington.
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NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | June 30, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Legislation that would double the excise tax on handguns and earmark the proceeds for a fund to help pay for the treatment of uninsured gunshot victims may reach the House floor months earlier than expected.A House Ways and Means panel yesterday considered attaching the measure, sponsored by Rep. Mel Reynolds, D-Ill., to a miscellaneous tax bill that could be put to a House vote within a couple of weeks. The action puts the bill on a fast track for approval by circumventing the usual committee hearings that can delay legislation.
NEWS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,Sun reporter | January 1, 2007
When lawmakers convene this month, Maryland could see the biggest change in care for the uninsured in the three decades since the state crafted a system that pays for uncompensated hospital care. With the number of uninsured large - 780,000 in the latest Census Bureau estimates and growing - momentum to find solutions is building, especially after last year's bruising fight over the so-called Wal-Mart bill. The bill, aimed at forcing the giant retailer to spend at least 8 percent of its Maryland payroll on health insurance, was passed over the governor's veto, only to be blocked by a federal court.
NEWS
By Olivia Bobrowsky and Olivia Bobrowsky,olivia.bobrowsky@baltsun.com | August 6, 2009
In the wake of severe funding cuts, a Maryland health care program that aids uninsured residents will curtail its operations this month. The University of Maryland's fleet of traveling health clinics won't make stops anymore in Glen Burnie, Cumberland and in a few locations on the lower Eastern Shore. In all, the budget for the School of Nursing's Wellmobile will be cut in half. "We're going to work to design a program that fits within the budget constraints," said Wellmobile's director, Susan Antol, who's still not sure of all the changes.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,Sun reporter | February 16, 2007
In November, the staff of the Maryland Health Care Commission floated an innovative plan for health coverage - covering nearly all of the uninsured, guaranteeing generous benefits, offering substantial premium subsidies for low- to moderate-income families, and giving every insured person or family a choice of plans. While elected officials worked on more incremental plans, the commission set out to cost out its plan. Yesterday, the bill was presented: $2.5 billion a year in state funds.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,Sun reporter | October 5, 2006
The federal government has rejected the state's application to offer prescription medicines at Medicaid prices to low- to moderate-income uninsured adults, state and federal officials said yesterday. The plan would have provided discounts to an estimated 37,000 people with incomes under about $20,000, Susan Steinberg, chief operating officer for the Medicaid program in the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, said yesterday. The federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS)
BUSINESS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Staff Writer | February 4, 1993
The cost of treating the uninsured at Maryland hospitals last year jumped by the largest amount in 12 years, prompting economists who run the state's hospital regulatory system to call for more affordable health insurance.But profits statewide jumped 85 percent last year after the system approved higher rates to pay for the expected increase in the number of people unable to pay for medical care.The bill for the uninsured -- $394 million -- grew 28 percent, according to figures released yesterday by the Health Services Cost Review Commission, which sets hospital rates in Maryland.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun Reporter | August 12, 2008
James Patrick O'Conor Jr., principal counsel to the Maryland Uninsured Employers' Fund and a Glen Arm resident, died Saturday of pancreatic cancer at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium He was 57. Mr. O'Conor - the eldest of eight - was born in Baltimore and raised in Towson. He was the grandson of Herbert Romulus O'Conor, who had been Maryland attorney general and governor from 1939 to 1947, when he resigned after being elected to the U.S. Senate. Mr.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun reporter | September 14, 2007
Sun follow-up Howard County's plan to provide health care to all its uninsured residents without a large infusion of public money prompted praise and surprise, with a touch of caution, from elected officials yesterday. "I think every time somebody takes this on, they're going to help surface the issues we have to solve at all levels," said U.S. Rep. John Sarbanes, a freshman Democrat whose district covers a portion of eastern Howard. "I think the county executive understands the leadership that a place like Howard County could take because it does have the resources."
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