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NEWS
June 30, 2010
Earlier this month, federal emergency benefits for the unemployed expired, and thousands of Marylanders lost a critical economic lifeline. These benefits were vital for the long-term unemployed, most of whom have already tapped out their personal savings and are now left wondering how to make ends meet. A recent Sun article, "Unemployed are losing some federal assistance" (June 29) suggests that these jobless workers forget a career and take anything with a paycheck. Unfortunately, this is exactly what many jobless workers have been trying for months with no luck.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2014
Maryland lost 600 jobs in February but also saw its overall unemployment rate dip to 5.7 percent, in part thanks to a revision of much steeper losses reported in January, according to new estimates from the U.S. Department of Labor. February's unemployment rate, a hair lower than January's revised 5.8 percent, is the lowest in the state since November 2008. Despite the hundreds of job losses estimated in February, January's reported reduction of 9,800 jobs was revised to a loss of 6,100 jobs.
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BUSINESS
December 3, 2009
The state said Wednesday that it is mailing letters to unemployed residents eligible for more weeks of unemployment-benefit checks. The 14-week extension went into effect the week of Nov. 8, but the state Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation needed time to reprogram its computers so residents can claim the additional checks. The agency said eligible Marylanders can get the missed weeks' checks retroactively. The extension took effect immediately after Congress made federal money available, increasing to 73 the number of weeks unemployed Maryland residents can collect.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2014
The first thing Eric Miles lost was his Jeep. Then it was the apartment that he and his 12-year-old son called home. Since the federal government cut off jobless benefits for the long-term unemployed late last year, the 54-year-old East Baltimore man has moved in with his sister, relied on family to pay the phone bill and borrowed bus fare to go out and look for work. "You're talking about $3.50 for an all-day bus pass," Miles said. "If you don't have the $3.50 coming in, you don't have it. " Nearly three months after Congress allowed the benefits to lapse, tens of thousands of out-of-work Marylanders are hoping that a bipartisan deal to extend the program through May will win approval.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | May 18, 2003
THREE YEARS ago, William R. Franklin was making a six-figure salary and presenting a paper titled "Complex Spatial Filters for Automatic Target Recognition and Feature-Aided Tracking" at a conference in Orlando, Fla. Now he is "viciously unemployed," as he describes it, and close to losing his Timonium townhouse in foreclosure proceedings. The holder of a doctorate in physics earned under a future Nobel laureate, a veteran of Maryland's defense industry, a speaker of several languages and an expert in signal processing and mathematical modeling, Franklin may be an emblem of the state's economy and of the difficulty of finding jobs for the highly educated unemployed over the age of 50. He is 52. He lost his job because of a drop in government funding last August, almost a year after the terrorist attacks prompted predictions of a renaissance for the war business.
NEWS
By KEITH BROOKSand MANNY NESS | January 14, 1991
As unemployment rates climb to their highest levels in over three years, jobless Americans no longer have the same safeguards that were available during previous recessions. The maximum 26 weeks of unemployment benefits is the least in 20 years; the 34 percent of jobless workers collecting benefits a sharp decline from 69 per cent in 1975. Even if this is not the big crash some believe is inevitable within the next decade, this country's only safety net for the jobless -- the unemployment insurance system -- is full of gaping holes.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Frank D. Roylance | February 7, 1992
Several dozen unemployed Marylanders and their supporters -- some with clothespins on their noses -- marched into the state's Office of Unemployment Insurance today and told the agency's director "the system stinks."Organized by the Baltimore Unemployed Council, the protest was mounted to demand an end to long delays in benefit approvals, alleged dehumanizing treatment and red tape that leaves applicants without cash for weeks or months."People are being terrorized," said Robert Simpson, an unemployed worker and council co-chairman.
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and Kim Clark and John E. Woodruff and Kim Clark,Sun Staff Writers | January 7, 1995
Despite steady improvement that brought Maryland's unemployment rate to a five-year low in November, the state's job base faces serious deterioration, economists who track the state say.The Maryland unemployment rate dipped to a seasonally adjusted 4.9 percent in November, falling a tenth of a point from October's 5 percent and remaining substantially below the national rate, as it has since last summer, the state Department of Economic and Employment Development...
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Special to The Sun | March 26, 1991
LEIPZIG, Germany -- In the largest demonstration in eastern Germany since the fall of communism, at least 60,000 people marched yesterday for an end to unemployment and the uncertainty that is gripping their lives.For many it was the first demonstration since the regular Monday night demonstrations in Leipzig in 1989 and 1990 for German unity and against the East German Communist government."I decided to go out on the streets again. I just couldn't sit inside and do nothing. My wife is unemployed -- she got her notice today, on Easter week.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | July 12, 1992
Carroll's unemployment rate dropped slightly in May, the fourth consecutive month the county has experienced a decrease.The rate for May was 5.7 percent, compared with 5.8 percent in April, the state Department of Economic and Employment Development reported last week.Fifty-five fewer people were unemployed in the county in May than in April, the numbers show.The county's jobless rate has been declining since February, when it was 8.5 percent.A year ago in May, Carroll's unemployment rate was 5.1 percent, DEED reported.
NEWS
March 21, 2014
The number of jobs in Maryland decreased by 9,800 in January. The statewide unemployment rate remains high at around 6 percent (compared to 3.6 percent at the start of 2008), and projected state tax revenues have recently been adjusted downward by $238 million. Balancing next year's budget has required some "creative" accounting in Annapolis, including dipping into money that was supposed to be set aside for state pensions. Under those circumstances, a tax break might even be in order, but surely lawmakers would want it focused on creating new jobs, particularly for communities like Baltimore or the lower Eastern Shore where the unemployment rates still hover near the double-digit mark.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2014
As with many things in life, the secret to clarifying butter is patience. "You can't hurry love," chef Linda Vogler instructs her culinary students, gathered around as she helps a student skim the foamy, fatty spots from a saucepan of melted butter. Then she breaks into song: "You can't hurry love. No, you just have to wait ... " and the students burst into giggles, a few singing along. Vogler is the beloved culinary instructor at Light House, an Annapolis-based shelter and homeless prevention organization.
NEWS
By Thomas E. Perez | January 23, 2014
This winter, Katherine Hackett is wearing a hat and coat around her Connecticut house. In order to save on heating costs, she keeps her thermostat set at 58 degrees. After 17 years in the health-care industry, after raising two sons who are now in the military, Ms. Hackett abruptly got a pink slip and has been unemployed for more than a year. But so far, Congress has shown little interest in throwing her a lifeline. By failing to extend the Emergency Unemployment Compensation program, Congress has cut off the jobless benefits that help Ms. Hackett and millions like her keep the lights on and the rent or mortgage paid.
NEWS
January 9, 2014
Monday, readers were entertained by two socialists on the op-page who honestly and sincerely believe government and politicians know best ( "Time to raise stagnant wages for lowest-paid workers," Jan. 6). If only there were a law, markets would stop behaving and just do what the law commands. But life doesn't roll that way. If minimum wages were raised to $40 an hour, what would happen? Most people would argue that wage is too much. Lots of jobs would disappear because of it. Such people are absolutely correct.
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2014
Fourteen Democratic governors have signed a letter drafted by Gov. Martin O'Malley that calls on Congress to extend federal unemployment benefits quickly or risk slowing the nation's economic recovery. "Congress should extend unemployment benefits, as many states continue to experience persistent levels of high unemployment," according to the letter, which was made public Wednesday and will be sent to House and Senate leaders. "Unemployment insurance has been effective in providing stability to our states' economies during times of uncertainty and weakness.
NEWS
January 8, 2014
I strongly disagree with Frank Conaway Sr.'s premise in a recent letter to the editor that people who lost their extended unemployment benefits will "have no choice but to take matters in their own hands, robbing and stealing to put food on the table and keep a roof over their heads" ( "End of unemployment benefits will hit Baltimore hard," Jan. 5). The "give me free money or I'll rob you" analogy is insulting and shortsighted. People who are morally bankrupt enough to rob and steal are most likely content with the free handout from the government for as long as it lasts.
NEWS
November 22, 2000
BEYOND Baltimore, the news is excellent: job growth up, unemployment down. Inside the city's borders, though, unemployment remains distressingly high. Close to a quarter of Maryland's unemployed live in Baltimore, even though the city accounts for just 11 percent of the state's civilian labor. Within the region, the city represents 23 percent of the work force, but a whopping 41 percent of the unemployed. It's a situation that has persisted throughout Maryland's long expansion. The state unemployment rate for September stood at 3.4 percent -- well below the national average.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff writer | February 9, 1992
Six hundred more people were unemployed in Carroll in December than November, as the county's unemployment rate jumped from 5.4 percent to 6.4 percent.The increase can be attributed to seasonal layoffs of construction workers, landscapers and others whose jobs are affected by cold weather, a county unemployment official said."December was full of people coming in who traditionally come in then -- all outdoors people," said Theodora Stephen, manager of the state Department of Economic and Employment Development in Westminster.
NEWS
January 8, 2014
Senate Republicans blinked this week on the issue of unemployment benefits, but you can bet that their House counterparts won't be so easily swayed by compassion. At least that's what Democrats are counting on. After legislation to resume long-term unemployment insurance benefits cleared a procedural hurdle on a 60-37 vote on Tuesday, House Speaker John Boehner announced that he'll only consider the measure if there are off-setting cuts in spending and the legislation "includes something to help put people back to work.
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