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NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | September 17, 2003
ATGLEN, Pa. - Between Genesis and the early Clinton years, countless men and women with knives faced myriad chickens in pursuit of innumerable meals to please, perhaps even surprise. Consider this in light of U.S. Patent No. 5,346,711, giving the holder exclusive rights to a chicken breast. Well, a way of cutting a chicken breast. The patent, issued September 1994, says: "Method of Making an Animal Muscle Strip Product." Little poetry there, but inventor Eugene D. Gagliardi Jr. has a better idea for a name.
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NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | May 21, 2003
Dr. Morton I. Rapoport isn't going to be the stereotypical retiree when he steps down as head of the University of Maryland Medical System in September. "I hate golf," he said. "I tried it. I don't do it very well." The prospect of having so much free time is foreign to the 68-year-old physician who, by most accounts, has been the driving force behind the transformation over the past two decades of the troubled University of Maryland Hospital into a thriving six-hospital system. "I tell folks I have been working on this job 24/7 for more than 20 years," said Rapoport.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | April 17, 2003
UMM QASR, Iraq - The hospital is mobbed. Mothers press inside the concrete structure with sons and daughters suffering from diarrhea, malnutrition, coughs and fevers. Men hobble about the lobby with crude crutches that Americans might recognize from Civil War photos. Outside, children who are thirsty and threadbare beg foreigners for water and dinars, the devalued Iraqi currency. The three doctors at this port city's only hospital have been working day and night to treat the daily influx of 800 to 1,000 people since war began three weeks ago. That is about triple the usual volume, and the doctors are weary from overwork, frustrated that they have had to turn some people away.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 16, 2003
UMM QASR, Iraq - Children begged for water, the schools remained closed and cranes in the once-busy port stood idle, but members of a newly formed town council stepped forward yesterday to declare a new era. "I would like to welcome you to liberated Iraq," Najim Abdul Madhi, a secondary school teacher, announced on the steps of a former hotel that has become an ad-hoc city hall. "It is a place you cannot forget anytime." There was no mistaking the irony of his words. Madhi spoke eloquently of Iraq as the cradle of civilization where "the first wheels turned," but he also wanted the United States and Great Britain to know that their work was just beginning.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 10, 2003
UMM QASR, Iraq - This is the place, just several miles from the Kuwaiti border, that American and British officials say is doing best among Iraq's southern cities, the place where water is most plentiful, where there are no problems with food and where medical care is available for those who need it. Perhaps it is doing better than other cities, but Umm Qasr is not doing well at all. A lot of people are sick, old people and babies, especially. Sewage bakes on streets. Garbage steams in the air. Even as Baghdad was being looted yesterday, as Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein appeared to be falling like his statues, and as this place had a right to finally feel free, people had other things on their mind - finding the drinking water, food and medical care that was supposed to be so plentiful.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 1, 2003
UMM QASR, Iraq - The wheelbarrow would not quite roll straight, but that did not stop the young man from filling it yesterday and pushing it away. Another man showed up in a little battered pickup truck with a big plastic basin in its bed. But most of the children, men and women arrived with small things, with empty bottles, plastic jugs, small trash cans, and even a vase or two. They arrived, at the edge of their battered city, to carry away some of...
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 26, 2003
KUWAIT CITY - The southern Iraq port city of Umm Qasr was under the control of U.S. and British troops yesterday, military officials said, opening a key route for humanitarian aid that could begin arriving in about two days. If that news sounds familiar, it might be because Secretary of Defense Donald H. Rumsfeld made the same announcement Friday. That turned out to be overly optimistic. Coalition forces continued to face lightly armed but exceptionally persistent members of the ragtag fedayeen, the zealous Iraqi militia that for nearly a decade has been the brutal force behind Saddam Hussein's fist.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 23, 2003
KUWAIT CITY - U.S. officials from President Bush on down have cautioned that war with Iraq could be difficult, and there was growing evidence yesterday that American and British troops, at least in some pockets of fighting, are facing more resistance than military planners expected. The glimpses of war as seen on television and in newspaper stories carrying Iraq datelines offer a view of the war mostly in narrow slices - what a camera on a hotel roof can capture of the bombing of Baghdad, what reporters traveling with troops can see in an extremely limited field of view.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | May 9, 2002
Dr. Morton I. Rapoport, who took over a financially troubled University of Maryland Hospital 20 years ago and oversaw its transformation into the thriving six-hospital University of Maryland Medical System, announced yesterday that he will retire as president and chief executive officer in June 2004. "I think it's time," said Rapoport, 67. When Rapoport took over what was then University Hospital in 1982, it was part of the University of Maryland and was running deficits of several million dollars a year.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | June 28, 2000
About 40 union supporters picketed for an hour at midday outside the University of Maryland Medical Center, continuing a public campaign to pressure hospital management to let workers vote on whether they want union representation. As a quasi-public entity, with board members appointed by the governor, the University of Maryland Medical System (UMMS) is not clearly covered by either the National Labor Relations Board, which oversees union elections of private employers, or by state laws governing bargaining rights for public employees.
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