Advertisement
HomeCollectionsUmms
IN THE NEWS

Umms

FEATURED ARTICLES
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2013
The University of Maryland Medical System has completed its merger with Upper Chesapeake Health in Harford County, four years after the medical institutions agreed to affiliate. Upper Chesapeake includes the 185-bed Upper Chesapeake Medical Center in Bel Air and the 89-bed Harford Memorial Hospital in Havre de Grace. The health system is now named University of Maryland Upper Chesapeake Health under the merger. Since partnering, UMMS has brought more specialty services to Harford County's fast-growing populations, which now stands at 248,000 residents.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2014
The University of Maryland Medical System will provide management services to Union Hospital in Elkton, the latest in a series of partnerships state hospitals are forming as they prepare for changes in the health reimbursement system. The affiliation will allow Union to tap into the resources of a major academic center and improve patient access to doctors and clinical services, the orhanizations said Wednesday in announcing the partnership. Union Hospital will keep full control over its finances and physical assets during the 24-month agreement.
Advertisement
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2012
Since becoming a part of the University of Maryland Medical System three years ago, Upper Chesapeake Health has attracted new doctors, broken ground on a new $60 million cancer center and won over patients who once left Harford County for care. Upper Chesapeake, with hospitals in Bel Air and Havre de Grace, was only able to afford such upgrades because of its new affiliation with the larger, better-capitalized University of Maryland Medical System, executives said. And it's not done.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2013
The University of Maryland Medical System has completed its merger with Upper Chesapeake Health in Harford County, four years after the medical institutions agreed to affiliate. Upper Chesapeake includes the 185-bed Upper Chesapeake Medical Center in Bel Air and the 89-bed Harford Memorial Hospital in Havre de Grace. The health system is now named University of Maryland Upper Chesapeake Health under the merger. Since partnering, UMMS has brought more specialty services to Harford County's fast-growing populations, which now stands at 248,000 residents.
NEWS
September 18, 2013
The criticism to University of Maryland Medical System officials for using off interest rate swaps is a classic case of Monday morning quarterbacking ( "UMMS defends use of interest rate swaps," Sept. 13). The labor union official who described the transactions as a "risky financial scheme" should change careers and become an investment adviser if she believes she can accurately predict future interest rate trends. Philip Enstice, Ellicott City
NEWS
December 10, 2012
I agree with your editorial ("The Salvation of St. Joseph," Dec. 3) on the likely benefits of the University of Maryland Medical System's purchase of St. Joseph Hospital. Nonetheless, St. Joseph "directives" effectively requiring that "[t]hose potential patients who might seek care not permitted by the Catholic faith including abortion, fertility treatment, or artificial contraception will have to look elsewhere," violate the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment to the United States Constitution.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2013
The University of Maryland Medical System has entered into a management agreement with the 37-bed Fort Washington Medical Center with provisions that would allow it to eventually take ownership of the facility in southern Prince George's County. Under the agreement, the current CEO and chief financial officer of Fort Washington Medical Center, which is owned by Nexus Health, would retain their positions but become employees of UMMS. The boards of both health systems would have to approve any merger or acquisitions.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2013
The University of Maryland Medical System has set aside tens of millions of dollars because of complex financial transactions related to interest rates that have not paid off — yet. The medical system cannot use those funds — $93 million at the end of March — even as it wrestles with financial pressures that have led to layoffs. Several years ago, UMMS entered into what are known as interest rate swaps when the financing tool was popular and widely used by hospitals, municipalities and businesses looking to protect themselves against the risk of rising interest rates.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2014
The University of Maryland Medical System will provide management services to Union Hospital in Elkton, the latest in a series of partnerships state hospitals are forming as they prepare for changes in the health reimbursement system. The affiliation will allow Union to tap into the resources of a major academic center and improve patient access to doctors and clinical services, the orhanizations said Wednesday in announcing the partnership. Union Hospital will keep full control over its finances and physical assets during the 24-month agreement.
NEWS
By John Reid | November 14, 2013
A patient-care technician for the University of Maryland Medical System must update his skills regularly to keep his job, but he hasn't seen an update in his salary. Another UMMS technician must work at least two jobs to have any money left after paying basic living expenses. And a third caregiver, who has worked for the medical system for several years, can barely afford care for his family at the very hospital where he cares for others. For UMMS caregivers, is this situation fair, decent or moral?
NEWS
By John Reid | November 14, 2013
A patient-care technician for the University of Maryland Medical System must update his skills regularly to keep his job, but he hasn't seen an update in his salary. Another UMMS technician must work at least two jobs to have any money left after paying basic living expenses. And a third caregiver, who has worked for the medical system for several years, can barely afford care for his family at the very hospital where he cares for others. For UMMS caregivers, is this situation fair, decent or moral?
NEWS
September 18, 2013
The criticism to University of Maryland Medical System officials for using off interest rate swaps is a classic case of Monday morning quarterbacking ( "UMMS defends use of interest rate swaps," Sept. 13). The labor union official who described the transactions as a "risky financial scheme" should change careers and become an investment adviser if she believes she can accurately predict future interest rate trends. Philip Enstice, Ellicott City
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2013
The University of Maryland Medical System has set aside tens of millions of dollars because of complex financial transactions related to interest rates that have not paid off — yet. The medical system cannot use those funds — $93 million at the end of March — even as it wrestles with financial pressures that have led to layoffs. Several years ago, UMMS entered into what are known as interest rate swaps when the financing tool was popular and widely used by hospitals, municipalities and businesses looking to protect themselves against the risk of rising interest rates.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2013
The University of Maryland Medical System has entered into a management agreement with the 37-bed Fort Washington Medical Center with provisions that would allow it to eventually take ownership of the facility in southern Prince George's County. Under the agreement, the current CEO and chief financial officer of Fort Washington Medical Center, which is owned by Nexus Health, would retain their positions but become employees of UMMS. The boards of both health systems would have to approve any merger or acquisitions.
NEWS
July 24, 2013
A recent Sun Article by Andrea Walker discussed the University of Maryland Medical Center's intention to rename Kernan Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation Hospital ("Kernan hospital changing name," July 8). James Lawrence Kernan was a Baltimore businessman who owned theaters and hotels. Mr. Kernan moved into one of his hotels and converted his mansion and estate to a hospital for children and later to include adults who required rehabilitative care. During his lifetime, Mr. Kernan watched his dream come true and the hospital become a success.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2013
Kernan Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation Hospital is changing its name to better reflect its ties to the University of Maryland Medical System. The hospital will be known as the University of Maryland Rehabilitation & Orthopaedic Institute effective this month. The new name is also meant to reflect its focus on innovation and research. The 144-bed hospital is the largest inpatient rehabilitation hospital and provider of rehabilitation services in the state. Patients come to the hospital after recovering from strokes, traumatic injury and other illnesses.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2012
When the owners of troubled St. Joseph Medical Center put the Towson hospital up for sale a year ago, the University of Maryland Medical System didn't hesitate to put in a bid. Medical violations by its star cardiologist had left St. Joseph in financial disarray and struggling to hang on to patients, doctors and its reputation. It faced millions of dollars in lawsuits and the prospect of a further decline. But the UMMS board and its top executives saw opportunity in the 148-year-old Catholic medical institution started by the Sisters of St. Francis.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2013
The University of Maryland Medical System is planning to build a $50 million ambulatory care center, for outpatient services, on the campus of Maryland General Hospital. Initial plans for the seven-story structure were revealed at the city's architectural review board Thursday, said Mark Wasserman, senior vice president for external affairs and development for the medical system. The building will be constructed on a now vacant lot at the intersection of Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard and Linden Avenue in midtown Baltimore, he said.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2013
The University of Maryland Medical Center will send layoff notices to employees at the end of the month as it looks to cut costs in the wake of federal budget cuts and what it and other state hospitals have called inadequate rate increases. Jeffrey Rivest, president and CEO of the Baltimore hospital, sent an email to managers Tuesday that said individual letters regarding layoffs would be given out June 25, 26 and 27. The number of people who will lose their jobs still is being finalized, said spokeswoman Mary Lynn Carver said.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and By Andrea K. Walker | May 24, 2013
Update : Carver said this afternoon that 50 total employees would lose their jobs, including 10 to 15 doctors and midwives. They could get jobs at other UMMS facilities, including other positions at Maryland General.  The obstetrics unit at Maryland General will close June 30th displacing 10 to 15 doctors and midwives. The news was first reported in the Baltimore Business Journal. The University of Maryland Medical System, which owns Maryland General, made the decision to stop the services because of a declining number of deliveries at the hospital, said spokeswoman Mary Lynn Carver.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.