Advertisement
HomeCollectionsTyson Foods
IN THE NEWS

Tyson Foods

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 31, 2004
SPRINGDALE, Ark. - Tyson Foods Inc. reduced its forecast of annual profit yesterday because of higher costs for feed grain and a drop in beef and chicken prices. Tyson's shares fell the most in more than a year. The world's largest meat processor said its profit will be $1.08 to $1.15 a share in the year that ends Oct. 2. Excluding expenses related to mad cow disease and plant closings, the company said it will earn $1.26 to $1.33. On that basis, analysts expected $1.45 a share. The forecast comes after Tyson Foods said July 26 that its fourth-quarter profit would fall because of a slump in U.S. meat exports.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 25, 2012
When I read the letter in the Saturday edition of The Sun "Pregnant pigs treated humanely" (Sept. 22), I had to laugh out loud when I read the name of the person who wrote the letter. Rick Berman is a well-known hired gun who uses front groups, such as "Center for Consumer Freedom," to defend his corporate clients in Washington, D.C. The "veterinarians" Mr. Berman describes in his letter claiming the policy of confining pregnant sows in cages so small that they cannot turn around and can barely stand up for their entire life is in fact humane are the same veterinarians who are on the huge agribusiness payroll.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | September 5, 2002
SPRINGDALE, Ark. - Tyson Foods Inc. said yesterday that it expects its profit in the current quarter to fall as much as 41 percent as the world's largest meat producer spends money to close hog farms and discontinue a brand it bought last year. Profit for the quarter that will end Sept. 28 will range from 13 cents to 15 cents a share, Tyson said in a news release. That would be 22 cents less than in the year-earlier period. Tyson, Smithfield Foods Inc., Hormel Foods Inc. and other meat companies have been hurt by a drought in the United States that has raised prices for grain-based animal feed and by a Russian ban on U.S. poultry imports imposed in March because of food-safety concerns.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,brent.jones@baltsun.com | January 16, 2010
A proposed settlement that could net consumers $5 million in refunds and coupons from the nation's largest poultry producer moved a step closer to fruition Friday when a federal judge signed off on the preliminary agreement. Judge Richard D. Bennett repeatedly expressed concerns about the $3 million in plaintiffs' attorneys' fees and court costs that could be paid by Tyson Foods under the terms of the settlement. Bennett said he would be hard-pressed to sign off on what he called such a disproportionate scale, with the plaintiffs' counsel set to get about 37.5 percent of the total, with consumers' refunds capped at $50. Consumer lawsuits were filed across the country in 2008 and later consolidated in Baltimore, accusing Tyson of lying about the drugs that go into its birds.
BUSINESS
By Ameet Sachdev and Ameet Sachdev,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 3, 2002
The on-off-on-again takeover drama that unfolded last year between Tyson Foods Inc. and meatpacker IBP Inc. has one clear beneficiary: Tyson Chief Executive Officer John H. Tyson. A year ago, Tyson agreed to buy IBP for $3.2 billion, only to call it off less than three months later after an investigation of financial irregularities at IBP's DFG Foods subsidiary in Chicago. IBP sued, and a judge ordered Tyson Foods to complete the merger. Tyson Foods revealed yesterday that it gave its chief executive a larger bonus than the company's compensation guidelines called for, awarding him a $2.1 million bonus last year.
NEWS
July 25, 1998
An article in yesterday's Maryland section incorrectly reported the total fine that the state is seeking from Tyson Foods Inc. in a lawsuit over alleged improper disposal of chicken waste. The amount is $5.37 million.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 7/25/98
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | June 10, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The FBI and the Justice Department are at odds over whether to curtail a politically sensitive investigation into allegations that Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy accepted personal favors from the Arkansas-based poultry processing giant Tyson Foods Inc., sources said yesterday.While the FBI believes it has not yet exhausted all avenues of inquiry, high-level Justice Department officials are pressing to close the case because they say investigators have found insufficient evidence that Mr. Espy violated the law, sources reported.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 2, 1995
WASHINGTON -- A federal judge has agreed to a request by lawyers for Mike Espy to limit an independent counsel's investigation into accusations against the former secretary of agriculture.And in a separate action, one of the companies that has become embroiled in the investigation, Tyson Foods Inc. of Springdale, Ark., has asked Attorney General Janet Reno to dismiss the independent counsel on the ground that he overstepped his legal authority.The independent counsel, Donald C. Smaltz, was appointed in September by a three-judge panel to determine whether Mr. Espy violated the law by accepting football tickets, free travel and other gifts from companies, including Tyson Foods, that pTC were regulated by the Department of Agriculture.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 21, 2001
Allen Family Foods Inc. violated state and federal labor laws by failing to pay overtime wages to the chicken catchers who gather birds for the company's poultry processing facilities in Maryland and Delaware, five workers contended in a federal lawsuit filed yesterday. The workers say in the complaint that they routinely work more than 40 hours a week, performing one of the toughest jobs in the poultry industry - catching chickens with their bare hands in crowded, poorly ventilated chicken houses on the Eastern Shore, and then stuffing them in cages to be transported to processing plants.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2005
Nine vendors whose companies include major names in the U.S. food industry were charged in federal court in New York yesterday with helping Columbia-based U.S. Foodservice Inc. perpetrate an $800 million accounting fraud that illustrated the pressure on suppliers to engage in a cover-up to maintain lucrative business relationships, attorneys said. The vendors, whose companies included General Mills Inc. and Tyson Foods Inc., were charged with aiding executives of U.S. Foodservice in producing false records that created the illusion of $800 million in added revenues over three years.
NEWS
By Brent Jones | brent.jones@baltsun.com | January 15, 2010
A proposed settlement that could net consumers $5 million worth of refunds and coupons from the nation's largest poultry producer moved one step closer to fruition Friday when a federal judge -- albeit with reservations -- signed off on the preliminary agreement. Judge Richard D. Bennett repeatedly expressed concerns about the $3 million plaintiffs attorneys' fees and court costs that could be paid by Tyson Foods under the terms of the settlement. Bennett said he would be hard-pressed to sign off on what he called such a disproportionate scale, with the plaintiffs' counsel set to get about 37.5 percent of the overall total, while thousands of consumers net refunds capped at $50. Several consumer lawsuits were filed across the country in 2008, and later consolidated in Baltimore, accusing Tyson of lying about the drugs that go into its birds, with the company marketing its poultry as raised without antibiotics.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | January 14, 2010
Consumers who thought they were buying antibiotic-free chicken could receive $5 million in cash and coupons under a proposed settlement to a lawsuit contending that the nation's largest poultry producer falsely promoted its birds as being raised without drugs. The deal to end a class action lawsuit against Tyson Foods will get its first public hearing Friday, when a federal judge in Baltimore is scheduled to review it for fairness. If approved, thousands of U.S. consumers could receive refunds of up to $50 per household.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop | tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | January 14, 2010
Consumers who thought they were buying antibiotic-free chicken could receive $5 million in cash and coupons under a proposed settlement to a lawsuit contending that the nation's largest poultry producer falsely promoted its birds as being raised without drugs. The deal to end a class action lawsuit against Tyson Foods will get its first public hearing Friday, when a federal judge in Baltimore is scheduled to review it for fairness. If approved, thousands of U.S. consumers could receive refunds of up to $50 per household.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN REPORTER | April 23, 2008
A federal judge in Baltimore ordered Tyson Foods yesterday to stop using a recent advertising campaign because he says it is misleading consumers into believing that the poultry giant is raising its chickens drug-free. The U.S. District Court ruling comes in response to a lawsuit filed against the company by Salisbury-based Perdue Farms and Sanderson Farms of Mississippi. The competing poultry producers claim that they're losing millions of dollars to Tyson because its advertising falsely claims that the company's birds are not medicated.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | June 26, 2007
Tyson Foods Inc., the biggest U.S. meat processor, and Syntroleum Corp. formed a joint venture to produce fuel from animal fat and vegetable oil in response to growing demand for energy from renewable sources. The venture's first project will be a $150 million plant that can produce 75 million gallons a year of synthetic fuel for the diesel, jet and military markets, the companies said in a statement. The plant, at a yet-to-be-chosen site, is expected to be operational in 2010, providing annual operating profit of $35 million to $60 million a year.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2005
Nine vendors whose companies include major names in the U.S. food industry were charged in federal court in New York yesterday with helping Columbia-based U.S. Foodservice Inc. perpetrate an $800 million accounting fraud that illustrated the pressure on suppliers to engage in a cover-up to maintain lucrative business relationships, attorneys said. The vendors, whose companies included General Mills Inc. and Tyson Foods Inc., were charged with aiding executives of U.S. Foodservice in producing false records that created the illusion of $800 million in added revenues over three years.
NEWS
April 1, 1994
Hillary Rodham Clinton for secretary of the Treasury!Anyone who could run $ 1,000 into $99,537, for a gain of $98,537, on the commodities futures markets between October 1978 and July 1979, ought to be making Uncle Sam's investments. What a way to run down that pesky national deficit! Play it on pork bellies.Mrs. Clinton, it is now known, took good advice in cattle futures from James Blair, a friend and lawyer who had Tyson Foods Inc. for a client. Bill Clinton, her husband, was the favored candidate for governor at the time, and after his election a month later, made a number of gubernatorial decisions benefiting Tyson Foods, which no doubt he would have made anyway.
NEWS
September 25, 2012
When I read the letter in the Saturday edition of The Sun "Pregnant pigs treated humanely" (Sept. 22), I had to laugh out loud when I read the name of the person who wrote the letter. Rick Berman is a well-known hired gun who uses front groups, such as "Center for Consumer Freedom," to defend his corporate clients in Washington, D.C. The "veterinarians" Mr. Berman describes in his letter claiming the policy of confining pregnant sows in cages so small that they cannot turn around and can barely stand up for their entire life is in fact humane are the same veterinarians who are on the huge agribusiness payroll.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.