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By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2014
Welcome to the Big Ten, Maryland. It's going to be a long road to acceptance. The Chicago-based blog Sherman Ave assigned each Big Ten school a corresponding Game of Thrones character last week. Many of their assignments were spot on - Northwestern as the smart, if not physically unimposing Tyrion Lannister; Michigan as the talented, slightly arrogant superpower Jamie Lannister; and Ohio State as the loathsome top dog Joffrey. But scroll to the bottom and you'll see new members Maryland and Rutgers, who join the league on July 1. They weren't exactly deemed worthy of Game of Thrones characters.
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By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2014
First off, let's just get this out of the way: This has been the most consistently excellent season of "Game of Thrones" yet. Every episode has been strong, and the season has - somewhat amazingly - avoided the obvious issues with transforming a tremendously complex set of fantasy novels into a television show. (Earlier seasons, while also quite good, have at times gotten lost in the show's endless maze of characters and incremental plot advancements.)  Second: Damn, that was a gruesome way to die. "The Mountain and the Viper" ended with the Red Viper's head smashed, the Mountain stabbed multiple times, and Tyrion Lannister sentenced to death.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2013
Remember when Daenerys Targaryen was just a little girl afraid of her older (loser) brother?  My, how times have changed.  In  “Valar Dohaeris,” the Season 3 premiere of HBO's “Game of Thrones,” Daenerys is looking more and more like the queen ascendant. I view this as a very good development, because (aside from Arya Stark and possibly Tyrion Lannister) the fair-haired Targaryen girl is my favorite character in “A Song of Ice and Fire,” the George R.R. Martin books on which the TV show is based.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2014
Welcome to the Big Ten, Maryland. It's going to be a long road to acceptance. The Chicago-based blog Sherman Ave assigned each Big Ten school a corresponding Game of Thrones character last week. Many of their assignments were spot on - Northwestern as the smart, if not physically unimposing Tyrion Lannister; Michigan as the talented, slightly arrogant superpower Jamie Lannister; and Ohio State as the loathsome top dog Joffrey. But scroll to the bottom and you'll see new members Maryland and Rutgers, who join the league on July 1. They weren't exactly deemed worthy of Game of Thrones characters.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2014
Much as it was on the Blackwater and at the Eyrie, Tyrion Lannister's is once again in danger. And, much as he did in those situations, Tyrion must rely on his phenomenal way with words (and Peter Dinklage's phenomenal acting) to sidestep that danger. The closing minutes of “The Laws of Gods and Men” was a court scene - - let's call it Tyrion's Trial - - and it was one of the strongest scenes this season. Dinklage's final monologue summed up with true feeling all of his character's troubles throughout his privileged-but-demeaned life and the injustice he now finds himself facing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | March 15, 2012
The nerd-epic (and I use that term with the deepest feeling of endearment) "Game of Thrones" is returning next month, and no one is more excited than our friends at Entertainment Weekly (and me!) . The magazine has dedicated not one, but four covers to the lengthy, complex fantasy series.  As I nerd myself, I couldn't be more excited. I shamefully admit to buying the "Game of Thornes" board game last month in a moment of weakness (don't judge).  Anyway, you're excited.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2013
“There's a beast in every man and it stirs when you put a sword in his hand,” - Jorah Mormont For the first two seasons on "Game of Thrones," terrible, cruel, unspeakable horrors tended to happen primarily to the Stark family. The Starks were the show's heroes, and in the sick, twisted ethos of Westeros that meant they were destined to suffer the worst. Then George R.R. Martin, David Benioff and D. B. Weiss started to transform the Lannister brothers into likeable, wisecracking anti-heroes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2012
"Death is so boring -- especially now, with so much excitement in the world. " -- Tyrion Lannister  If there was any doubt as to which character would replace the beheaded Ned Stark as the new star of"Game of Thrones,"the Season 2 premiere erased that.  Tyrion Lannister is your man.  The witty imp, played by Emmy-winner Peter Dinklage, has gone from supporting actor to the lead. Now the hand of the king (thanks to a smart appointment by his father, Tywin)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2012
"It is better to be cruel than weak. " - Theon Greyjoy Whoa. Did Theon Greyjoy really just kill Bran and Rickon Stark?! Moreover: Why is this show so insanely cruel to its only honorable family? The seventh episode in the second season of"Game of Thrones"ended with Greyjoy's soliders hanging the tarred bodies of two young boys, leading the people of Winterfell (and viewers) to presume that he had killed Bran and Rickon (who I believe are only 9 and 4 years old, respectively)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2014
Much as it was on the Blackwater and at the Eyrie, Tyrion Lannister's is once again in danger. And, much as he did in those situations, Tyrion must rely on his phenomenal way with words (and Peter Dinklage's phenomenal acting) to sidestep that danger. The closing minutes of “The Laws of Gods and Men” was a court scene - - let's call it Tyrion's Trial - - and it was one of the strongest scenes this season. Dinklage's final monologue summed up with true feeling all of his character's troubles throughout his privileged-but-demeaned life and the injustice he now finds himself facing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2013
“There's a beast in every man and it stirs when you put a sword in his hand,” - Jorah Mormont For the first two seasons on "Game of Thrones," terrible, cruel, unspeakable horrors tended to happen primarily to the Stark family. The Starks were the show's heroes, and in the sick, twisted ethos of Westeros that meant they were destined to suffer the worst. Then George R.R. Martin, David Benioff and D. B. Weiss started to transform the Lannister brothers into likeable, wisecracking anti-heroes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2013
Remember when Daenerys Targaryen was just a little girl afraid of her older (loser) brother?  My, how times have changed.  In  “Valar Dohaeris,” the Season 3 premiere of HBO's “Game of Thrones,” Daenerys is looking more and more like the queen ascendant. I view this as a very good development, because (aside from Arya Stark and possibly Tyrion Lannister) the fair-haired Targaryen girl is my favorite character in “A Song of Ice and Fire,” the George R.R. Martin books on which the TV show is based.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2012
"Death is so boring -- especially now, with so much excitement in the world. " -- Tyrion Lannister  If there was any doubt as to which character would replace the beheaded Ned Stark as the new star of"Game of Thrones,"the Season 2 premiere erased that.  Tyrion Lannister is your man.  The witty imp, played by Emmy-winner Peter Dinklage, has gone from supporting actor to the lead. Now the hand of the king (thanks to a smart appointment by his father, Tywin)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | March 15, 2012
The nerd-epic (and I use that term with the deepest feeling of endearment) "Game of Thrones" is returning next month, and no one is more excited than our friends at Entertainment Weekly (and me!) . The magazine has dedicated not one, but four covers to the lengthy, complex fantasy series.  As I nerd myself, I couldn't be more excited. I shamefully admit to buying the "Game of Thornes" board game last month in a moment of weakness (don't judge).  Anyway, you're excited.
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