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By Diane Haithman and Diane Haithman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 15, 2004
LOS ANGELES - An auction of natural history specimens in Los Angeles tomorrow will determine whether bones thought to be additional parts of the first Tyrannosaurus rex discovered will be reunited with those of the dinosaur uncovered more than 100 years ago. Experts say a collection of T. rex fossil bones and fragments from the Cretaceous period, to be auctioned at Bonhams & Butterfields auction house, are most likely parts of the prehistoric creature found...
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TRAVEL
By June Sawyers and June Sawyers,Tribune Newspapers | August 30, 2009
"Large Art in Small Places: Discovering the California Mural Towns" Ten Speed Press, $24.95: Murals often are overlooked as people either take them for granted or ignore them. In this handsome guide to 250 contemporary murals in California's small towns, author Kevin Bruce tries to make up for that oversight while featuring murals that are off the beaten track. Bruce defines a mural town as a place "where the town intends the murals to be all, or part, of a plan to attract tourism." Several of the towns have only one or two murals; others boast more than a dozen or even two dozen.
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NEWS
By Erika Gebel and Erika Gebel,Special to The Sun | April 13, 2007
THE TISSUE SAMPLE Paleontologists were able to extract bone-making collagen from the thighbone of a 68 million-year-old Tyrannosaurus rex. WE HAVE A MATCH Using the collagen extracted from the T. rex?s thighbone, paleontologists determined a link in the collagen material found in the bone and that of a modern-day chicken. Next time you order fried chicken, consider this: Beneath that crispy skin, you may find a link to the heart of history's most terrifying beast. New evidence unveiled in today's edition of Science puts the fearsome Tyrannosaurus rex embarrassingly close - in evolutionary terms - to the modern-day chicken.
NEWS
By Erika Gebel and Erika Gebel,Special to The Sun | April 13, 2007
THE TISSUE SAMPLE Paleontologists were able to extract bone-making collagen from the thighbone of a 68 million-year-old Tyrannosaurus rex. WE HAVE A MATCH Using the collagen extracted from the T. rex?s thighbone, paleontologists determined a link in the collagen material found in the bone and that of a modern-day chicken. Next time you order fried chicken, consider this: Beneath that crispy skin, you may find a link to the heart of history's most terrifying beast. New evidence unveiled in today's edition of Science puts the fearsome Tyrannosaurus rex embarrassingly close - in evolutionary terms - to the modern-day chicken.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 19, 2006
When I was growing up, Tyrannosaurus rex was the big, nasty meat-eater on [the] block, but here we've got other things vying for the king of nasty." - TOM DEMERE, curator of paleontology at the San Diego Natural History Museum, on a dinosaur discovery in Argentina
NEWS
July 26, 2000
Visit these Web sites to find the answers, then go to www.4Kids.org / detectives / What does R.M.S. stand for in "R.M.S. Titanic"? How many seasons does Antarctica have? How many hours were spent preparing Sue's bones? TYRANNOSAURUS SUE Come face-to-face with the largest and best-preserved Tyrannosaurus rex at the Field Museum in Chicago. Sue was discovered by fossil hunter Sue Hendrickson more than a decade ago in the badlands of South Dakota. Now you can check out Sue for yourself online at www.fmnh.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 21, 2006
Paleontology Dinosaur discovery leads meat-eaters in size The fossilized remains of what may have been the largest meat-eating dinosaur has been discovered in Argentina - a bus-sized monster that attacked its prey in roving packs, scientists announced Monday. The remains of at least seven of the beasts, named Mapusaurus roseae, were found clustered in 100-million-year-old rocks south of the city of Plaza Huincul in western Patagonia. Based on a shin bone that was about 3 feet long, researchers estimate that the largest adult in the group stretched about 41 feet and weighed about 15,000 pounds.
TRAVEL
By June Sawyers and June Sawyers,Tribune Newspapers | August 30, 2009
"Large Art in Small Places: Discovering the California Mural Towns" Ten Speed Press, $24.95: Murals often are overlooked as people either take them for granted or ignore them. In this handsome guide to 250 contemporary murals in California's small towns, author Kevin Bruce tries to make up for that oversight while featuring murals that are off the beaten track. Bruce defines a mural town as a place "where the town intends the murals to be all, or part, of a plan to attract tourism." Several of the towns have only one or two murals; others boast more than a dozen or even two dozen.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robert Hilburn and Robert Hilburn,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 22, 2004
One reason this Swedish quintet was such a refreshing arrival here two years ago was that it came with a secret weapon: a smile. From its snappy wardrobe and self-congratulatory stage patter to its hyperactive mix of punk and garage rock, the Hives seemed not only smart but also blessed with a limitless imagination. "Yes, America, you love us," lead singer Howlin' Pelle Almqvist told the opening-night audience that spring at the Roxy in Los Angeles. "We've come to take over your country and change everything.
FEATURES
By Molly Dunham Glassman and Molly Dunham Glassman,Staff Writer | June 11, 1993
They've started saving for the sneakers. They've memorized the "only studio-authorized" magazine. They've lugged the lunch box everywhere.And now, the moment they've been waiting for: "Jurassic Park" opens today after the most frenzied marketing blitz this side of the Super Bowl.Unfortunately, the movie probably is too violent for many of the kids hopped up on the hype. Even the movie's director, Steven Spielberg, says he won't let his 8-year-old see it "for a couple of years."So how do you try to mollify kids who are too old for Barney but too young to watch the flesh-ripping tyrannosaur munch an attorney for lunch?
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 21, 2006
Paleontology Dinosaur discovery leads meat-eaters in size The fossilized remains of what may have been the largest meat-eating dinosaur has been discovered in Argentina - a bus-sized monster that attacked its prey in roving packs, scientists announced Monday. The remains of at least seven of the beasts, named Mapusaurus roseae, were found clustered in 100-million-year-old rocks south of the city of Plaza Huincul in western Patagonia. Based on a shin bone that was about 3 feet long, researchers estimate that the largest adult in the group stretched about 41 feet and weighed about 15,000 pounds.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 19, 2006
When I was growing up, Tyrannosaurus rex was the big, nasty meat-eater on [the] block, but here we've got other things vying for the king of nasty." - TOM DEMERE, curator of paleontology at the San Diego Natural History Museum, on a dinosaur discovery in Argentina
NEWS
By PETER GORNER and PETER GORNER,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 9, 2006
Fossil hunters announced yesterday that they have found the oldest known tyrannosaur - an ancestor of the fearsome Tyrannosaurus rex that had a bizarre combination of features, including a large, fragile crest on its head that would have attracted mates but made it vulnerable in a fight. The diminutive dinosaur, which lived 160 million years ago, stood 3.6 feet tall and measured 9.8 feet long. That was a far cry from T. rex, which came along 90 million years later and stood about 15 feet high and 40 feet long, weighed roughly 6 tons and had a large mouth that bristled with 6-inch-long, sharp, serrated teeth.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robert Hilburn and Robert Hilburn,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 22, 2004
One reason this Swedish quintet was such a refreshing arrival here two years ago was that it came with a secret weapon: a smile. From its snappy wardrobe and self-congratulatory stage patter to its hyperactive mix of punk and garage rock, the Hives seemed not only smart but also blessed with a limitless imagination. "Yes, America, you love us," lead singer Howlin' Pelle Almqvist told the opening-night audience that spring at the Roxy in Los Angeles. "We've come to take over your country and change everything.
BUSINESS
By Todd Beamon and Todd Beamon,BALTIMORESUN.COM STAFF | May 24, 2004
Most people mark the beginning of summer with Memorial Day this weekend -- and the Maryland Science Center will be no exception with its "Touch Wonder Weekend" celebration to open the refurbished and expanded facility. "We wanted to capitalize on the unofficial kickoff of the summer season, to make sure that we're out there and everyone knows about it," said Christopher Cropper, the center's senior marketing director. The event includes a number of free events Saturday and Sunday outside the center, at 601 Light St. in the Inner Harbor.
NEWS
By Diane Haithman and Diane Haithman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 15, 2004
LOS ANGELES - An auction of natural history specimens in Los Angeles tomorrow will determine whether bones thought to be additional parts of the first Tyrannosaurus rex discovered will be reunited with those of the dinosaur uncovered more than 100 years ago. Experts say a collection of T. rex fossil bones and fragments from the Cretaceous period, to be auctioned at Bonhams & Butterfields auction house, are most likely parts of the prehistoric creature found...
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | April 21, 2004
Back by popular demand after an absence of 65 million years, a 40-foot-long Tyrannosaurus rex has appeared this week at the south end of Baltimore's Inner Harbor promenade. Dubbed "Peck's Rex," after the Fort Peck, Mont., region where the fossil skeleton was found, the dinosaur stands in the front window of the addition nearing completion at the Maryland Science Center. Teeth gleaming and jaws agape, the T. rex is poised as if in the middle of a lunge at pedestrians on the promenade below.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | June 11, 1993
You don't have to wonder why "Jurassic Park" (already one of your top three parks, after Central and Palisades) is going to be the monster hit of the season, with theater lines as long as a brachiosaurus' tail.It's got dinosaurs. Big ugly ones. You get just one look at these bad boys and, bam, you're up to your eyes in dino-mania -- guaranteed.I hope Steven Spielberg can live with himself.We start our kids off on Barney -- "harmless," we tell the little tykes, and before you know it they're dino-hooked -- and then we've got them running to the movies where we scare the heck out of them with the real thing, just to sell a little popcorn.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | April 21, 2004
Back by popular demand after an absence of 65 million years, a 40-foot-long Tyrannosaurus rex has appeared this week at the south end of Baltimore's Inner Harbor promenade. Dubbed "Peck's Rex," after the Fort Peck, Mont., region where the fossil skeleton was found, the dinosaur stands in the front window of the addition nearing completion at the Maryland Science Center. Teeth gleaming and jaws agape, the T. rex is poised as if in the middle of a lunge at pedestrians on the promenade below.
NEWS
July 26, 2000
Visit these Web sites to find the answers, then go to www.4Kids.org / detectives / What does R.M.S. stand for in "R.M.S. Titanic"? How many seasons does Antarctica have? How many hours were spent preparing Sue's bones? TYRANNOSAURUS SUE Come face-to-face with the largest and best-preserved Tyrannosaurus rex at the Field Museum in Chicago. Sue was discovered by fossil hunter Sue Hendrickson more than a decade ago in the badlands of South Dakota. Now you can check out Sue for yourself online at www.fmnh.
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