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By ALVIN SHUSTER | July 12, 1995
Los Angeles. -- I admit to a romantic attachment to the typewriter. I admit to assisting two Underwoods, three Olympias, four Olivettis and two Royals to huddle in a corner of my garage as if hiding from the Internet. I will never sell them, even though I've been offered as much as $1 apiece.These are old and dear friends who have gone with me on stories in Saigon, Belfast, Rome, Addis Ababa and elsewhere, and they can continue to feel safe. Particularly secure is the one that has not been unwrapped since the movers packed it in 1967.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2012
This month, 900 Strayer University students walked across the stage at 1st Mariner Arena during a regional commencement ceremony in which they were awarded bachelor's degrees from an institution whose Baltimore roots date to the late 19th century. Strayer's Business College began in Baltimore in 1892 as the brainchild of Seibert Irving Strayer, a Bucknell University graduate who was a writer and shorthand innovator. In 1902, he was joined by Thomas W. Donoho, a former manager of a typewriter company and a lawyer who later headed the Baltimore school.
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NEWS
April 22, 2005
Agnes E. Long, former owner of a Baltimore typewriter sales and repair company and volunteer, died of breast cancer Monday at the Broadmead retirement community. The longtime Towson resident was 81. Born and raised Agnes Elizabeth Luczak in Connellsville, Pa., she came to Baltimore after graduating from high school in 1942 to take a job as a secretary at the old Glenn L. Martin Co. aircraft plant in Middle River. "When she walked into the plant, my father, Frederick R. Holloway, who was 12 years older, said to his friend, `I'm going to marry that girl,' and they got married in 1944," said her daughter, Lynn H. Hunter of Ellicott City.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 18, 2011
Gertrude K. Dorsey, who was among the first women in the state to become a certified public accountant, died of congestive heart failure Tuesday at the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. She was 93 and a Towson resident. Born Gertrude Hubert Kitchen in Atlanta, she was the granddaughter of the Cherokee County sheriff. Her father moved his family to Halethorpe when she was 6 months old. She was a 1935 graduate of Catonsville High School, where she earned varsity letters in field ball, basketball and volleyball and played on the state championship volleyball team.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Brian Boney and Brian Boney,Dallas Morning News | September 6, 1999
Louise Chandler has been using typewriters since before they came with a "1" key. That was in 1960, when the new typewriters of the day featured an electric motor and all 10 digits.In those days, Chandler spent up to four hours a day in front of her typewriter. Today, if Chandler, a secretary in the Student Life office at the University of Texas at Dallas, works on the office's typewriter for more than 30 minutes, she's put it to heavy use."I'd say I use it from 20 to 30 minutes a day at peak use. It kind of depends on what I'm doing that day," she says.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 18, 2011
Gertrude K. Dorsey, who was among the first women in the state to become a certified public accountant, died of congestive heart failure Tuesday at the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. She was 93 and a Towson resident. Born Gertrude Hubert Kitchen in Atlanta, she was the granddaughter of the Cherokee County sheriff. Her father moved his family to Halethorpe when she was 6 months old. She was a 1935 graduate of Catonsville High School, where she earned varsity letters in field ball, basketball and volleyball and played on the state championship volleyball team.
NEWS
July 18, 1995
County police arrested a Millersville man on drug charges Saturday morning after they found cocaine and marijuana in one of his shorts pockets, officials said.Northern District officers Mary Kohlepp and Todd Powell were operating a radar gun about 9:40 a.m. on Church Street near Wasena Avenue when a man allegedly sped by in a 1989 Plymouth Horizon. They stopped the car and arrested the driver after he failed a field sobriety test, police said.When officers searched the man they found a bag containing white powder and a green leafy substance, which later tested positive as cocaine and marijuana, police said.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 28, 1995
RICHMOND, Va. -- Virginia prison officials said yesterday that a loaded pistol may have been planted in a typewriter in the cell of a man who was executed Thursday and that they had concluded his lawyer's report about the weapon must be part of a hoax.In a three-page statement, officials said that no fingerprints were found on the gun and that the lawyer had improperly taken the typewriter that was said to contain the gun.The man who was executed, Willie Lloyd Turner, became one of Virginia's best-known prisoners on death row as he repeatedly demonstrated his talent for fashioning keys, swords and bombs from goods as mundane as soap.
NEWS
May 23, 2001
What novel produced by Miss Milton's possessed typewriter became a best seller for a record 33 months? Send your answer to us by fax to 410-783-2519; by e-mail to sun.features@baltsun.com or by mail to Weekly Question, The Sun, Features Department, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, MD 21278. Please include your name, age, grade and the school you attend. Teachers: check www.sunspot.net / nie tomorrow for stance questions related to Just for Kids stories.
FEATURES
By Anita Gold and Anita Gold,Chicago Tribune | October 11, 1992
Q: Where can I get an authentic-looking reproduction of an pTC Early American candle chandelier fitted with enough electrified candles and flame-shaped bulbs to light a full-size dining room properly?A:Write to the Workshops of David T. Smith, 3600 Shawhan Road, Morrow, Ohio 45152; (513) 932-2472, enclosing $3.50 for a catalog of his furniture and chandeliers or $19.95 for a product-inventory videotape.Q: How can I find out the value of an old rowing machine?A: Collector Kevin Mark appraises pre-1960 exercise equipment.
NEWS
December 3, 2009
MAX EISEN, 91 Broadway press agent Max Eisen, a Broadway press agent from the days when feeding tidbits of gossip to columnists like Walter Winchell and staging stunts were standard practice for stirring up a bit more box-office appeal, died Nov. 23 of natural causes at his home in Manhattan. From his office above Sardi's on West 44th Street, Mr. Eisen worked the phone and clacked out news releases on his battleship-gray electric typewriter for more than four decades.
NEWS
April 22, 2005
Agnes E. Long, former owner of a Baltimore typewriter sales and repair company and volunteer, died of breast cancer Monday at the Broadmead retirement community. The longtime Towson resident was 81. Born and raised Agnes Elizabeth Luczak in Connellsville, Pa., she came to Baltimore after graduating from high school in 1942 to take a job as a secretary at the old Glenn L. Martin Co. aircraft plant in Middle River. "When she walked into the plant, my father, Frederick R. Holloway, who was 12 years older, said to his friend, `I'm going to marry that girl,' and they got married in 1944," said her daughter, Lynn H. Hunter of Ellicott City.
NEWS
July 27, 2002
A BALTIMORE college student who was heading off for a month's study in Cuba was mystified when a brochure arrived telling her to bring, among other necessities, some carbon paper. She might just as well have been told to sharpen her nibs. After her parents explained to her what carbon paper is, they set out to find some, heavy of heart at the prospect of what surely would be a frustrating and fruitless mission. But no! It was easy. You may not have given carbon paper much thought since the early years of the first Reagan administration, but that doesn't mean it's not still out there.
NEWS
May 23, 2001
What novel produced by Miss Milton's possessed typewriter became a best seller for a record 33 months? Send your answer to us by fax to 410-783-2519; by e-mail to sun.features@baltsun.com or by mail to Weekly Question, The Sun, Features Department, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, MD 21278. Please include your name, age, grade and the school you attend. Teachers: check www.sunspot.net / nie tomorrow for stance questions related to Just for Kids stories.
NEWS
By Mitra Modarressi | May 23, 2001
* Editor's note: Magic can be found in the most ordinary objects. Spudville was a quiet town. The houses were clean, the yards were neatly mowed and people kept to themselves. Nothing strange ever happened in Spudville until ... One Saturday a handwritten notice appeared around town: YARD SALE! it read. TODAY ONLY! MR. FLOTSAM'S PLACE, 99 CROOKED HILL ROAD. No one could remember a yard sale in Spudville before. They decided to check it out. "Howdy," Mr. Flotsam said as people began to arrive.
NEWS
By CHRISTINA BITTNER and By CHRISTINA BITTNER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 26, 1999
AS THE END OF 1999 rushes upon us, I take little comfort in accepting that I have done everything that a non-computer geek can do to prepare for Y2K. All program updates have been downloaded in the home computer, leaving just one thing to do to ensure a smooth transition to the year 2000:I've dusted off the old manual typewriter. It is not only Y2K compatible, but Y3K as well -given enough tender, loving care and a little oil and cleaning now and then.An early jump on springThe Arundel Improvement Association's Community Advocates for Senior Opportunity and Services has the ticket to beat winter blues and welcome spring: a seven-day bus trip to Florida.
NEWS
March 4, 1994
RUMMAGING through the basement for snow survival gear recently, we came across a dust-caked relic of a typewriter that had seen its better days decades before we acquired it to compensate for the inadequacies of abominable penmanship.Recalling its unreliable performance even while maintained, we pushed it back under the stairs for later decision.This now-ancient piece of equipment reminded us, though, of a classic description of the orneriness of typing machines that Jack London penned on his experience as a novice writer in San Francisco:"My brother-in-law owned a machine which he used in the daytime.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Brian Boney and Brian Boney,Dallas Morning News | September 6, 1999
Louise Chandler has been using typewriters since before they came with a "1" key. That was in 1960, when the new typewriters of the day featured an electric motor and all 10 digits.In those days, Chandler spent up to four hours a day in front of her typewriter. Today, if Chandler, a secretary in the Student Life office at the University of Texas at Dallas, works on the office's typewriter for more than 30 minutes, she's put it to heavy use."I'd say I use it from 20 to 30 minutes a day at peak use. It kind of depends on what I'm doing that day," she says.
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