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By Kay Withers and Kay Withers,Special to The Sun | December 9, 1990
WARSAW, Poland -- Poles vote today in the second round of presidential elections after a bitter campaign that revealed the weakness and division of the ruling Solidarity labor movement.Today's candidates for the as-yet undefined office of head of state were the top vote-getters Nov. 25: Solidarity leader Lech Walesa, the favorite, and emigre Stanislaw Tyminski, a Polish-Canadian-Peruvian who outpolled Solidarity Prime Minister Tadeusz Mazowiecki and sent Solidarity into a state of shock.Both Mr. Walesa and Mr. Tyminski are populists.
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NEWS
May 25, 2005
On May 22, 2005, JOSEPH G., beloved husband of Agnes M. Reimer (nee Tyminski); beloved father of Robert J. Reimer and the late Stephen J. Reimer; father-in-law of Roseanne Reimer; loving grandfather of Stephen Reimer, Jessica Mc Guire and her husband Phillip and Brett Reimer; dear uncle of Lois Hewitt, Joseph and Frank Tyminski. Relatives and friends are invited to call at the Schimunek Funeral Home, Inc., 9705 Belair Rd, (Perry Hall) on Wednesday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M., with a Christian Wake Service at 3:30 P.M. Funeral Mass will be celebrated at St. Michael the Archangel Catholic Church in Overlea on Thursday at 10 A.M. Interment in Oak Lawn Cemetery.
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NEWS
By Kay Withers and Kay Withers,Special to The Sun | November 22, 1990
WARSAW, Poland -- A public opinion survey showing that a mysterious Canadian of Polish origin has outstripped Poland's prime minister in the race for the Polish presidency sent waves of panic through political circles here yesterday.The poll, taken last weekend by the government organization CBOS, showed that Solidarity leader Lech Walesa still led the field of six candidates. But his lead, once commanding, had been whittled down to a rating of only 27 percent, far short of the 50 percent needed to win outright Sunday and avoid a second round of voting Dec. 9.The revelation, however, concerned second place, previously occupied by Solidarity Prime Minister Tadeusz Mazowiecki.
NEWS
By Kay Withers and Kay Withers,Special to The Sun | December 10, 1990
WARSAW, Poland -- Lech Walesa, the shipyard electrician who was a political prisoner nine years ago, was elected president of Poland yesterday.The Solidarity leader overwhelmingly beat his rival, Polish-Canadian businessman Stanislaw Tyminski, in a runoff after the first round of balloting two weeks ago.Mr. Walesa won 75 percent of the vote, compared with Mr. Tyminski's 25 percent, and at last Poland got a freely elected president to succeed Communist Gen. Wojciech Jaruzelski."I always said I would get between 70 and 80 percent," Mr. Walesa joked in his hometown of Gdansk late last evening.
NEWS
By Kay Withers and Kay Withers,Special to The Sun | November 26, 1990
WARSAW, Poland -- Lech Walesa, the legendary leader of the Solidarity labor union, won a plurality of votes yesterday in Poland's first direct presidential election in 45 years, but he fell short of the absolute majority he needed to avoid a runoff.Mr. Walesa's first-place showing was overshadowed by a surprising race for second place, in which Prime Minister Tadeusz Mazowiecki was running behind Stanislaw Tyminski, an expatriate businessman with no political experience.If early returns and government projections based on exit polls are confirmed, the Dec. 9 runoff will feature Mr. Walesa and Mr. Tyminski, a Polish-Canadian unknown here two months ago, instead of Mr. Mazowiecki, the pragmatic prime minister Mr. Walesa appointed in August 1989.
NEWS
By Kay Withers and Kay Withers,Special to The Sun | December 7, 1990
WARSAW, Poland -- The bitter Polish presidential election campaign drew to a close last night after a final week of what a Warsaw daily termed "the political gutter."An extraordinarily hostile and coordinated campaign was waged against the outsider who in the first round Nov. 25 unexpectedly eliminated Prime Minister Tadeusz Mazowiecki from this weekend's runoff and demonstrated to Poland's new, post-Communist leadership just how tenuous is its grip on power.The Solidarity labor movement, which has run the country for more than a year, mobilized state institutions, a faithful press, an allegedly apolitical church and undemocratic extremists to oppose mysterious emigre Stanislaw Tyminski, whose popularity at the polls threatened Solidarity leader Lech Walesa's ascension to the presidency.
NEWS
May 25, 2005
On May 22, 2005, JOSEPH G., beloved husband of Agnes M. Reimer (nee Tyminski); beloved father of Robert J. Reimer and the late Stephen J. Reimer; father-in-law of Roseanne Reimer; loving grandfather of Stephen Reimer, Jessica Mc Guire and her husband Phillip and Brett Reimer; dear uncle of Lois Hewitt, Joseph and Frank Tyminski. Relatives and friends are invited to call at the Schimunek Funeral Home, Inc., 9705 Belair Rd, (Perry Hall) on Wednesday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M., with a Christian Wake Service at 3:30 P.M. Funeral Mass will be celebrated at St. Michael the Archangel Catholic Church in Overlea on Thursday at 10 A.M. Interment in Oak Lawn Cemetery.
NEWS
By ASSOCAITED PRESS | November 26, 1990
WARSAW, Poland (AP) -- Lech Walesa has won the first round in presidential elections but, in a startling upset, Prime Minister Tadeusz Mazowiecki was shut out of next month's runoff by a wealthy, enigmatic emigre.Walesa, the favorite in yesterday's balloting, had 39 percent of the vote with 48 of 49 provinces reporting.The emigre businessman, Stanislaw Tyminski, won nearly 24 percent to Mazowiecki's 17.5 percent, according to provincial election commission results reported by the official PAP news agency.
NEWS
By Kay Withers and Kay Withers,Special to The Sun | November 27, 1990
WARSAW, Poland -- Polish Prime Minister Tadeusz Mazowiecki resigned last night after his stunning defeat in Sunday's presidential elections not only by Solidarity leader Lech Walesa but also by an unknown Polish-Canadian emigre, Stan Tyminski.Mr. Mazowiecki said that his Solidarity government had relied on the support and understanding of the population during a period of necessary but "extremely painful" reforms."For several months I believed that that understanding existed," he said. "Yesterday's election results show that the situation has changed."
NEWS
By Kay Withers and Kay Withers,Special to The Sun | November 28, 1990
WARSAW, Poland -- Solidarity leader Lech Walesa urged Prime Minister Tadeusz Mazowiecki yesterday to withdraw his resignation and help calm the country's economic and political crises.Mr. Walesa, winner of a plurality but not an outright majority in the first round of presidential elections Sunday, confirmed that he would contest the runoff Dec. 9.He said he would ask Mr. Mazowiecki, who announced his resignation after finishing third in the voting, to stay in office until the next parliamentary elections, expected in a few months.
NEWS
By Kay Withers and Kay Withers,Special to The Sun | December 9, 1990
WARSAW, Poland -- Poles vote today in the second round of presidential elections after a bitter campaign that revealed the weakness and division of the ruling Solidarity labor movement.Today's candidates for the as-yet undefined office of head of state were the top vote-getters Nov. 25: Solidarity leader Lech Walesa, the favorite, and emigre Stanislaw Tyminski, a Polish-Canadian-Peruvian who outpolled Solidarity Prime Minister Tadeusz Mazowiecki and sent Solidarity into a state of shock.Both Mr. Walesa and Mr. Tyminski are populists.
NEWS
By William Pfaff | December 9, 1990
Paris.--THE POLLS still say that Lech Walesa will win Poland's run-off presidential election today, but it is no sure thing. Given the frightening turn Poland's affairs have taken, it is essential that he do so. It also proves to have been essential that he and not Tadeusz Mazowiecki won the first round November 25.One's deepest sympathy was with Mr. Mazowiecki, a self-effacing intellectual attempting to carry out a rational reconstruction of Poland's ruined...
NEWS
By Kay Withers and Kay Withers,Special to The Sun | December 7, 1990
WARSAW, Poland -- The bitter Polish presidential election campaign drew to a close last night after a final week of what a Warsaw daily termed "the political gutter."An extraordinarily hostile and coordinated campaign was waged against the outsider who in the first round Nov. 25 unexpectedly eliminated Prime Minister Tadeusz Mazowiecki from this weekend's runoff and demonstrated to Poland's new, post-Communist leadership just how tenuous is its grip on power.The Solidarity labor movement, which has run the country for more than a year, mobilized state institutions, a faithful press, an allegedly apolitical church and undemocratic extremists to oppose mysterious emigre Stanislaw Tyminski, whose popularity at the polls threatened Solidarity leader Lech Walesa's ascension to the presidency.
NEWS
By Kay Withers and Kay Withers,Special to The Sun | November 28, 1990
WARSAW, Poland -- Solidarity leader Lech Walesa urged Prime Minister Tadeusz Mazowiecki yesterday to withdraw his resignation and help calm the country's economic and political crises.Mr. Walesa, winner of a plurality but not an outright majority in the first round of presidential elections Sunday, confirmed that he would contest the runoff Dec. 9.He said he would ask Mr. Mazowiecki, who announced his resignation after finishing third in the voting, to stay in office until the next parliamentary elections, expected in a few months.
NEWS
November 27, 1990
Poles may not have much practice in democracy but they know about negative campaigning. It was a dismal campaign on all sides that saw the Nobel Peace Prize laureate and charismatic Solidarity union founder, Lech Walesa, win a commanding lead going into the Dec. 9 run-off.The principal loser, Prime Minister Tadeusz Mazowiecki, deserved better from Poles. He has thoughtfully tried to translate slogans into reforms. He is paying the price of resentments by people who lost their guaranteed place, however inadequate, in the Communist state.
NEWS
By Kay Withers and Kay Withers,Special to The Sun | November 27, 1990
WARSAW, Poland -- Polish Prime Minister Tadeusz Mazowiecki resigned last night after his stunning defeat in Sunday's presidential elections not only by Solidarity leader Lech Walesa but also by an unknown Polish-Canadian emigre, Stan Tyminski.Mr. Mazowiecki said that his Solidarity government had relied on the support and understanding of the population during a period of necessary but "extremely painful" reforms."For several months I believed that that understanding existed," he said. "Yesterday's election results show that the situation has changed."
NEWS
By Kay Withers and Kay Withers,Special to The Sun | December 10, 1990
WARSAW, Poland -- Lech Walesa, the shipyard electrician who was a political prisoner nine years ago, was elected president of Poland yesterday.The Solidarity leader overwhelmingly beat his rival, Polish-Canadian businessman Stanislaw Tyminski, in a runoff after the first round of balloting two weeks ago.Mr. Walesa won 75 percent of the vote, compared with Mr. Tyminski's 25 percent, and at last Poland got a freely elected president to succeed Communist Gen. Wojciech Jaruzelski."I always said I would get between 70 and 80 percent," Mr. Walesa joked in his hometown of Gdansk late last evening.
NEWS
November 27, 1990
Poles may not have much practice in democracy but they know about negative campaigning. It was a dismal campaign on all sides that saw the Nobel Peace Prize laureate and charismatic Solidarity union founder, Lech Walesa, win a commanding lead going into the Dec. 9 run-off.The principal loser, Prime Minister Tadeusz Mazowiecki, deserved better from Poles. He has thoughtfully tried to translate slogans into reforms. He is paying the price of resentments by people who lost their guaranteed place, however inadequate, in the Communist state.
NEWS
By Kay Withers and Kay Withers,Special to The Sun | November 26, 1990
WARSAW, Poland -- Lech Walesa, the legendary leader of the Solidarity labor union, won a plurality of votes yesterday in Poland's first direct presidential election in 45 years, but he fell short of the absolute majority he needed to avoid a runoff.Mr. Walesa's first-place showing was overshadowed by a surprising race for second place, in which Prime Minister Tadeusz Mazowiecki was running behind Stanislaw Tyminski, an expatriate businessman with no political experience.If early returns and government projections based on exit polls are confirmed, the Dec. 9 runoff will feature Mr. Walesa and Mr. Tyminski, a Polish-Canadian unknown here two months ago, instead of Mr. Mazowiecki, the pragmatic prime minister Mr. Walesa appointed in August 1989.
NEWS
By ASSOCAITED PRESS | November 26, 1990
WARSAW, Poland (AP) -- Lech Walesa has won the first round in presidential elections but, in a startling upset, Prime Minister Tadeusz Mazowiecki was shut out of next month's runoff by a wealthy, enigmatic emigre.Walesa, the favorite in yesterday's balloting, had 39 percent of the vote with 48 of 49 provinces reporting.The emigre businessman, Stanislaw Tyminski, won nearly 24 percent to Mazowiecki's 17.5 percent, according to provincial election commission results reported by the official PAP news agency.
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