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NEWS
February 11, 2014
After a 47-year career first with Bethlehem Steel and then with General Motors and not getting raises for years when the companies where losing money, I do not understand how civil service employees can spend my tax dollars and give raises within such a short time frame to a person who has not done the job that they where hired to do ("Former Md. health exchange director given 5 wage increases," Feb. 7). This is just another case of Maryland elected officials' cronyism that they would hire Rebecca Pearce to do a job that she was not qualified to do. J. Heming, Baltimore - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
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SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
At some point, UMBC coach Don Zimmerman will consider retiring and riding into the sunset. But even he isn't sure when that will happen. “I enjoy coming to work every day, and I think this job is certainly challenging,” the 61-year-old Zimmerman said Monday morning, days after the university announced agreeing to a two-year contract extension with Zimmerman that will keep him with the Retrievers through the 2016 season. “I'm excited for the challenges, and I'm going to keep going as long as UMBC wants me. I feel as though I've still got plenty of gas in the tank.
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NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2011
A document examiner at the Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration in Mondawmin Mall was sentenced to two years in federal prison Wednesday for illegally producing identification documents for foreign applicants, according to the Maryland U.S. Attorney's Office. Warren Hall, 48, of Pikesville, was also ordered to forfeit $40,000, prosecutors said. His alleged accomplice, Adalberto Benito Prins, who prosecutors claim acted as a translator and middle man, is a fugitive. "This type of criminal activity allows dangerous criminals to obscure their identities and cover their tracks," William Winter, Special Agent in Charge of Homeland Security Investigations in Baltimore, said in a statement.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | October 3, 2014
UMBC men's lacrosse coach Zimmerman's contract extended two years UMBC men's lacrosse coach Don Zimmerman has signed a two-year contract extension through the 2016 season, the school announced Wednesday. He will enter his 22nd season at UMBC in 2015, his 29th overall. His career record stands at 228-153; his winning percentage of .598 is among the top 10 of active Division I coaches. More college lacrosse: Ohio State will travel to Baltimore for Michael R. Breschi Scholarship Weekend.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2013
A Severn man was sentenced to two years in prison and must pay for the funeral of the man who died after the two got into a fight at a trailer park last winter, an Anne Arundel County judge ruled Tuesday. Anthony James Garcia, 49, of the 1000 block of Egret Court in Severn, pleaded guilty to manslaughter in September in the death of David Lamont Harley, 45, last December. Police said Harley and Garcia had fought on Fair Breeze Drive in the Severn Mobile Home Park on Dec. 6. Harley was hospitalized and was taken off life support about a week later, police said.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2014
St. Mary's girls lacrosse coach Kate Hickman said the veterans on her team have just had enough of losing. After two years without a win in the Interscholastic Athletic Association of Maryland A Conference, the Saints are off to a 3-0 start, an opening run that may surprise some but not Hickman, a former All-Metro midfielder at Severna Park. The second-year coach saw the transition beginning last year. "The first half of the season was about me realizing that the mentality that was the product of years of losing was something I had to address before I could even start addressing the other issues on the field," said Hickman, who had come from a powerhouse Severna Park program where players always took the field expecting to win. Even though the Saints finished 2-13 last year without a conference win, they got a whole lot better as the season went on. They lost their first five conference games by a margin of 11.4 goals.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2014
In what will be his first game in almost two years, Stephen Banick is slated to start in reigning Division III national champion Stevenson's season opener against York on Saturday. The sophomore attackman will play with no limitations on his role and playing time. Banick has not played since breaking his left leg in a loss to Salisbury in the NCAA semifinals on May 20, 2012. He sat out last season after suffering an undisclosed injury in the preseason. But he has played fully in the fall and preseason, and coach Paul Cantabene said that he has no questions about the 5-foot-10, 175-pound Banick's durability.
NEWS
September 11, 1998
A 49-year-old Taneytown man was sentenced yesterday to two years in jail for raping and sexually abusing his daughter, then 11, while his wife was at work or out playing bingo.The man, who is not being identified to protect the child's privacy, was sentenced to 12 years in prison with all but twoyears suspended on the child-abuse charge. He received a concurrent 10-year term with all but two years suspended on the rape charge.Upon his release, he will be placed on five years of supervised probation.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | December 19, 1998
Edgar Prado became only the third jockey in history to record 1,000 victories over two years yesterday when he steered Halfway North to a 2 3/4 -length win over Savanna Dawn in Laurel Park's sixth race.He joined Chris McCarron and Kent Desormeaux in the exclusive club but became the first to accomplish the feat without the benefit of the 5-pound weight break allowed to apprentice riders. Both McCarron and Desormeaux were apprentices in the first of their two years and first-year journeymen in their second.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2012
A Queenstown man who spent three years in prison for killing a Maryland Transportation Authority officer when his pickup truck rammed into the officer's cruiser was ordered Tuesday to return to prison for another two years. When charged last fall with drug violations, Albert Gene Antonelli, 40, was in the midst of his five years of probation after the end of his prison stay for causing the 2004 crash that killed Duke G. Aaron III of Pasadena near the Bay Bridge. Antonelli had been sentenced in 2005 to serve three years of a five-year prison term for manslaughter in Aaron's death, followed by probation.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
Maryland is now facing a $405 million revenue shortfall over this year and next, largely the result of sluggish job growth, stagnant incomes and a weak housing market, state officials reported Wednesday. Five years after the official end of the recession, Maryland continues to confront fiscal trouble. This latest shortfall will force Gov. Martin O'Malley's administration and the General Assembly to make deeper cuts than previously expected to balance the state's roughly $40 billion budget.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
The ramp carrying southbound Interstate 395 traffic onto northbound Interstate 95 in Baltimore will close overnight as part of the ongoing work repairing deck surfaces and joints in the area, according to the Maryland Transportation Authority. The ramp, a main artery for downtown traffic onto northbound I-95, will close at 10 tonight and reopen at 5 a.m. on Tuesday morning, the MdTA said. Drivers will be detoured to southbound I-95, to Caton Avenue and then onto northbound I-95, the MdTA said.
NEWS
By Valerie Bonk | August 21, 2014
LEGOs aren't just for the playroom.  This summer, the colorful blocks are being used in Howard County camps as a way to introduce engineering skills to students as young as 4 years old in a new wave of summer camps focusing on science, technology and engineering. “Many programs use LEGOs as the building block, literally, for instruction in engineering,” says Holly Harden, Teen Programs Manager at Howard County Recreation & Parks. “Participation in these programs can motivate kids to learn math and science concepts by engaging them in real-world engineering problems.” The emphasis on science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM)
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
State and federal officials announced Thursday a $2.2 million research effort aimed at preventing harm to whales and other marine mammals from building massive industrial wind turbines off Ocean City . The two-year study, to be led by the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, will include using underwater microphones to record sounds of whales and other marine mammals in the ocean where the federal government is soliciting bids...
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2014
Baltimore City Community College has been warned that its accreditation could be in jeopardy amid concerns about its focus, goals and effectiveness, just two years after the college was taken off probation over fixing problems with its assessment of student learning. The Middle States Commission on Higher Education, which accredits colleges and universities in Maryland and several other states and U.S. territories, placed BCCC on "warn" status at its meeting June 26. The action was made public Thursday.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 30, 2014
The alleged "raid" on the Republican senatorial primary in Mississippi, wherein black Democratic voters were said to have crossed over to vote for longtime incumbent Thad Cochran, has outraged his tea-party challengers. It sounds like a version of the old Dixie lament that "those people" should stay with their own kind. The real culprit is the Magnolia State itself, for holding an open primary law that allows voters to participate in a runoff regardless of party. And it's another reminder of the basic Republican problem of being branded as hostile or just unaccommodating to minority voters and their interests.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1999
For much of this decade, James Cunningham has been trying to win approval to open a rubble landfill on a site next to an older, filled-up dumping facility that for years has evoked concerns about pollution and other complaints from Gambrills-area neighbors.At a public hearing last night, the neighbors were hoping his efforts to win that approval would have to continue into the next millennium.Cunningham appeared before the Anne Arundel County Board of Appeals, seeking a variance from requirements that had allowed him until January 1999 to get the necessary permits and complete the project.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1999
For much of this decade, James Cunningham has been trying to win approval to open a rubble landfill on a site next to an older, filled-up dumping facility that for years has evoked concerns about pollution and other complaints from Gambrills-area neighbors.At a public hearing last night, the neighbors were hoping his efforts to win that approval would have to continue into the next millennium.Cunningham appeared before the Anne Arundel County Board of Appeals, seeking a variance from requirements that had allowed him until January 1999 to get the necessary permits and complete the project.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2014
Members of the union representing most of The Baltimore Sun's newsroom employees voted to approve a two-year contract extension Wednesday evening that freezes wages. The union, the Washington-Baltimore Newspaper Guild, supported the extension. The Sun's parent, the Tribune Co., expects to spin off its newspapers as a separate company this summer, and Guild leaders said the current contract offers employees stability and protection. A Baltimore Sun spokeswoman said the company was happy with the results.
NEWS
By Bob Gallagher and Joanna Diamond | June 17, 2014
It's not easy telling the next governor of Maryland that he or she needs to start thinking right now about manure, but the winner of this fall's election won't have any time to waste. Toxic algal blooms and intersex fish are two examples of the threat the agriculture industry poses. We like to think of our farms as open space and natural operations that provide the food we need. But without proper pollution controls, not all 21st century farms are environmentally benign. Unfortunately, that threat is well documented in Maryland.
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