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By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2011
More than a week after Hurricane Irene blew through Maryland, power has been restored to almost all public schools in Baltimore, Baltimore County and Anne Arundel County. In Baltimore County, Winfield Elementary is closed Tuesday because it doesn't have power, and in the city, Lockerman Bundy Elementary is also closed to students, the systems said. Lockerman Bundy staff should report to Mary Ann Winterling Elementary. Irene played havoc with the schedules of educators, parents and students, as schools lost, gained, and in some instances re-lost power from day to day.
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie and By Liz Bowie | August 5, 2014
In a letter Tuesday to Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz, school Superintendent Dallas Dance said he had agreed to drop the plan to renovate the former Loch Raven Elementary School and put an addition on the Cromwell Valley Elementary School. "As we discussed, I am committed to working with you, as we have been, regarding our capital plan moving forward," Dance said. Last Friday, Kamenetz announced that he would not fund the proposals the school district had made for the two schools because the cost estimates had risen substantially.
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie and By Liz Bowie | August 5, 2014
In a letter Tuesday to Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz, school Superintendent Dallas Dance said he had agreed to drop the plan to renovate the former Loch Raven Elementary School and put an addition on the Cromwell Valley Elementary School. "As we discussed, I am committed to working with you, as we have been, regarding our capital plan moving forward," Dance said. Last Friday, Kamenetz announced that he would not fund the proposals the school district had made for the two schools because the cost estimates had risen substantially.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2014
In the usual course of life's events, most people go to school. Very few people, however, buy a schoolhouse and call it home. In the usual course of life's events, most people go to school. Very few people, however, buy a schoolhouse and call it home. "It's old and unusual, but wears its age so well," said Heather Wirth, who along with her husband, Steve Bogucki, purchased the circa-1888, two-room schoolhouse in Parkton on St. Patrick's Day 1990. "It's fun living in a building with a past that's had so many other uses - first as a school, then as a duplex, then as an antiques shop [and]
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2004
Seven thousand dollars isn't much when you're faced with the needs of 500 students and 44 teachers, but Bakerfield Elementary School Principal Joseph Stevens will take whatever he can get. In a school that draws pupils from some of the county's poorest families, there is never a shortage of needs for books, pencils and even board games used for teaching math to pupils who don't respond well to the traditional classroom approach, Stevens said. The Aberdeen school will get a little help from the federal government.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | May 12, 1998
Parents in a Silver Spring neighborhood have filed a civil rights complaint with the federal government, accusing local school officials of turning two elementary schools into warehouses for some of the poorest, minority children in Montgomery County.The complaint, filed yesterday with the Department of Education, alleges school board decisions over the last 13 years have led to segregation at New Hampshire Estates and Oak View elementary schools, depriving students of an equal education.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,arin.gencer@baltsun.com | December 4, 2008
On most mornings, Principal Renee Johnson takes a walk through the halls of Chesapeake Terrace Elementary in southeastern Baltimore County, popping in to see students and the school's nine classroom teachers. Less than two miles away, her counterpart at Edgemere Elementary, Bob Findley, takes a similar walk, albeit with more stops: He has 24 classroom teachers. With the help of a recently formed boundary-change committee, school officials are seeking to balance enrollment between the two schools.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,sara.neufeld@baltsun.com | March 22, 2009
They started from the lowest possible point, with reading proficiency rates in the single digits and dismal learning environments. Ever since three Baltimore elementary schools were put under the auspices of a for-profit company nearly nine years ago, they have gotten money and resources above and beyond what other city schools receive to try to turn themselves around. Today, the schools' climates are vastly improved under the management of New York-based EdisonLearning, but only one of the three is meeting academic targets.
NEWS
By Debbie M. Price and Stephen Henderson and Debbie M. Price and Stephen Henderson,SUN STAFF | April 6, 1998
Every five lessons, City Springs first-grade teacher Harriet Brown tests her students. Do the children know that "ph" sounds like "f" and that "strip" is not "stripe?" Can they read the little story about the fox who tried to con a girl out of her ice cream cone?The school's reading program requires this regular measurement.At Lyndhurst Elementary, teacher Betty Pierce thinks she knows how well each of her first-graders can read, but it's just her educated guess, drawn from 30 years in the classroom.
NEWS
By Jean Thompson and Kate Shatzkin and Jean Thompson and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | October 11, 1996
Recent city and state inspections of boilers in Baltimore schools have revealed widespread code violations and safety problems that will require about $2 million in repairs and replacements this fall.When the inspections began last month, city officials did not anticipate purchasing large equipment and predicted that the majority of repairs required would be small jobs, such as installing safety valves.Now, the evaluation provides the city its first broad look at the effect of putting off boiler maintenance for years.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | January 7, 2014
Harford County officials warned residents of hypothermia and other dangers in light of record-setting cold temperatures Monday and Tuesday, and there was more concern about the abnormally cold temperatures overnight Tuesday into Wednesday morning. The county was hit by bitter cold that started Monday night, with temperatures plummeting into the low single digits and the wind chill making it feel as cold as 15 degrees below zero overnight. Temperatures were reported as low as 1 degree or zero overnight Monday, and though it was sunny throughout the day Tuesday, high temperatures barely reached above 10 degrees in and around Bel Air. The impending cold forced Harford County Public Schools to cancel all classes Tuesday.
NEWS
October 18, 2013
I would like to thank the readers who pointed out that the former Loch Raven Elementary School is indeed used by a variety of groups and services. It affirms that the building has remained an integral part of Loch Raven Village all these years. We have been dealing with the county trying to demolish LRES since it was closed as a school in 1983. We are dumbfounded as to why Loch Raven Elementary has had a target on it all this time. Before LRES was closed, we had two schools in Loch Raven Village, Pleasant Plains and Loch Raven Elementary, and they served our community quite well.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2013
Dundalk's high school deteriorated during the past two decades just as the community's once-bustling steel mill declined. From the school's top floor, you could see the Key Bridge and the detritus of a shuttered industrial past. Inside, the school mirrored the dilapidation. The windows had clouded over, no air conditioning meant classroom temperatures would soar, and the roof leaked so badly that large garbage cans were strategically placed during storms to catch water dripping through the ceiling.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2013
The Baltimore City school board approved three new charter schools to open beginning in 2014, including two schools that will be subject to heightened scrutiny throughout their contracts. The Lillie May Carroll Jackson School, which will be operated by a nonprofit organization created by Roland Park Country School and educate girls in grades 5-8, won a smooth approval to open in 2014. But the Green Street Academy, which has been operating as a "transformation" school with an environmental theme for the past three years, "stretched certain standards," city schools CEO Andrés Alonso said in recommending to grant the school charter status.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2012
Baltimore County school leaders have paid a total of $150,989 in a settlement with two high-ranking employees who signed contracts with the former superintendent, even though the school system and new superintendent contend that the contracts were not legal. The two employees, who left voluntarily, had signed contracts with former Superintendent Joe A. Hairston before he retired that would have triggered payments of nearly a half-million dollars if his successor fired them. The county school administrators union criticized the agreements, and some experts questioned whether they were valid.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2012
The two high-ranking school employees who signed contracts with former Baltimore County Superintendent Joe A. Hairston before he retired have both left the system. The contracts would have paid the employees nearly a half-million dollars if new Superintendent Dallas Dance had fired them when bringing in his own leadership team. Dance had reassigned Donald Peccia, the assistant superintendent of human resources, and Phyllis Reese, the chief communications officer, when he took over on July 1. On Tuesday night, the school board approved Peccia's retirement and Reese's resignation, both effective Aug. 1, as part of personnel moves.
NEWS
By Debbie M. Price and Stephen Henderson and Debbie M. Price and Stephen Henderson,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1998
At City Springs Elementary, where phonics ruled instruction last year, first-graders sounded out words in twice-daily reading classes, drilled relentlessly with a teacher and an aide and took ,, weekly tests.At Lyndhurst elementary, children memorized lists of words and read aloud from storybooks; their classrooms had no aides and some teachers rarely gave diagnostic tests.While the reading instruction at the two schools couldn't have been more different, their students' results on citywide tests released last month, it turns out, were equally mediocre.
SPORTS
November 19, 1993
Tickets for the Calvert Hall-Loyola Thanksgiving Day football game scheduled for 10 a.m. next Thursday at Towson State University can be purchased at the two schools. Call Calvert Hallat (410) 825-4266 or Loyola at (410) 823-0601.
SPORTS
By Jeff Ermann and Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2012
Editor's note: Each week, InsideMdSports.com provides this blog with a Maryland recruiting feature that previously appeared as premium content on its site. Everywhere they go these days, Aaron Harrison and Andrew Harrison are a featured attraction. The twin brothers from Travis High in Richmond, Texas, ranked as the No. 1 shooting guard and No. 1 point guard in the Class of 2013, respectively, tend to draw big crowds of spectators and college coaches.
EXPLORE
January 11, 2012
The Carroll County Sheriff's Office has released surveillance photographs of a suspect wanted in connection with the vandalism of two Westminster-area schools on Christmas Day. Just before 3 p.m. on Dec. 25, deputies responded to a burglar alarm at the William Winchester Elementary School on Monroe Avenue just outside of Westminster. On Wednesday, Jan. 11, the Sheriff's Office released a surveillance image, and said it shows a white male, approximately 25 years old, with a brown hair, seen approaching the school from the Englar Road side with two bricks in hand.
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