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NEWS
October 24, 1990
Howard's two state senators are steady, though quiet, performers in Annapolis. Thomas Yeager in District 13 and Edward Kasemeyer in District 14 face stiff Republican challenges but offer voters more capable representation.In Subdistrict 13A, incumbent Del. Virginia Thomas is the clear choice. So is Del. Robert J. DiPietro, the former mayor of Laurel, in Subdistrict 13B. For the third delegate slot, we endorse Republican Martin Madden.We highly commend the two Republicans in Subdistrict 14B, incumbents Robert Kittleman and Robert Flanagan.
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NEWS
February 24, 2010
For years, Republicans in the General Assembly have been carping that Democrats spend too much, but rarely have they said what they would do instead. They occasionally propose an across-the-board spending cut -- a bad idea that fails to set any priorities. But often they eschew specifics, saying that if they offered any, they would only be fodder for Democratic demagoguery. Their grandstanding has been particularly galling since the vast majority of them voted for the biggest spending increases in decades when a Republican held the governor's office.
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NEWS
By Elise Armacost and Paul Shread and Elise Armacost and Paul Shread,Staff writers | December 15, 1991
After years of 7-0 votes, it's a new era on the County Council -- less predictable, less civil, less boring.Starting with its first meeting after the 1990 election, when freshman Councilman Carl G. "Dutch" Holland asked Councilman David G. Boschert to "enlighten me on your qualifications," this council has provided surprises, conflict anda striking contrast to the homogeneity of previous years."
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,Sun reporter | September 7, 2006
In 2001, Carol Anneliese "Lisa" Marquardt was teaching Spanish part time when she became passionate about saving a Lutherville forest from developers. She says she contacted dozens of politicians and spent hours negotiating with lawyers. Although Marquardt, 49, lost the battle to save the forest, she emerged from the experience convinced that residents need legal expertise and better communication with elected officials. She enrolled in law school at the University of Baltimore, graduated and passed the bar. Now she is running for the Republican nomination for the Baltimore County Council seat representing the 2nd District, which includes Pikesville and parts of Owings Mills and Lutherville.
NEWS
August 15, 1994
Voters in Legislative Districts 6 and 7 on Baltimore County's east side certainly can't complain about having too few candidates to choose from. In the two districts, a total of 39contenders are jostling for state Senate and House of Delegates seats.Democratic incumbent Michael J. Collins is challenged in the District 6 Senate race by retired Orphans' Court judge Alexander B. Page Jr. We believe Mr. Collins, a fairly reliable legislator, is the better choice. Given the four Republicans aiming for the Senate, The Sun's selection is Alfred E. Clasing Jr., who has served on the county's Planning Board and in numerous civic organizations.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 21, 1998
WASHINGTON -- With the stroke of a pen yesterday, President Clinton helped widen a rift between rank-and-file Republicans who are eager to defy unpopular health insurers in an election year and GOP leaders who want to avoid alienating their corporate supporters.The president's "bill of rights" for patients that was unveiled yesterday seeks to improve the care received by the nearly 90 million Americans enrolled in federal health programs. It might prod Congress to follow suit for patients covered by private health plans.
NEWS
February 22, 2000
THE RESULTS are in -- and it's not encouraging for the presidential election this fall. Negative campaign tactics have been declared the winner, by a wide margin. Instead of a debate on issues voters care about, the campaign apparatus of Texas Gov. George W. Bush has been sullying the conservative credentials of upstart Sen. John McCain of Arizona. Not surprisingly, those tactics worked in Saturday's Republican primary in South Carolina. It also, not surprisingly, provoked Mr. McCain to strike back while touring Michigan, accusing his opponent of twisting the truth "like President Clinton" and going negative through surrogates.
NEWS
February 23, 1997
IF DEMOCRATS are at the trough, can Republicans be far behind? Or do they get there first, and lap up the biggest share? This is a distressing thought worth pondering as GOP "Team 100" -- a gathering of big contributors at a Florida resort -- winds up its exercise in access. Access being of the chatting-up-your-senator sort, which is heady stuff even if it can't compare to White House coffee klatches for Democratic givers.Democrat Bill Clinton and Republican Senate leader Trent Lott agree on one thing: They both love and believe in political money -- lots of it, in volumes that made the last election the first billion-dollar affair of its kind in history.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Sun Staff Writer | June 12, 1994
When Helen Fister went to register to vote as a Republican shortly after moving to Anne Arundel County in 1961, she remembers being cautioned against it.Because there were few registered Republicans in the county and fewer GOP candidates, "they told me it was no use because I'd never get to vote in a primary," she recalled.But how the times have changed, said Mrs. Fister, chairwoman of the county's Republican Central Committee, the party's elected policy-making body.This year, for the first time in the 33 years she has lived in Anne Arundel, the GOP will challenge the Democrats for every elective seat.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2002
Democrat C. Vernon Gray has held Howard County's District 2 County Council seat for so long that county Democrats may feel the east Columbia-Jessup district is theirs for the taking. But two Republicans, Ananta Hejeebu and Raymond J. Bly, are also competing to replace the five-term veteran. Three Democrats - Calvin B. Ball III, David A. Rakes and Michelle Williams are contending for their party's nomination. The two Republicans offer GOP voters a very distinct choice. Bly, 52, is a maverick - a longtime Jessup used-appliance dealer who sees himself as representative of the "mom-and-pop," older commercial culture in the U.S. 1 corridor - the one county officials are hoping will give way to more upscale businesses.
NEWS
By MARY GAIL HARE and MARY GAIL HARE,SUN REPORTER | August 20, 2006
In Harford's District C, the race to represent the county's most densely populated area on the County Council has attracted three candidates, the least number of hopefuls for any of the six seats. Republicans James V. McMahan Jr. and Brian Young will square off in the Sept. 12 primary. The winner will face Joan Morrissey Ward, the lone Democrat in the November race. The victor will represent Bel Air and its immediate environs on the seven-member panel.
NEWS
By LARRY CARSON and LARRY CARSON,SUN REPORTER | August 20, 2006
Candidates' forums can be inconvenient -- and lengthy -- to attend, but a politically diverse group of Howard County bloggers is planning an electronic question-and-answer session for the general election that voters can use when and how they please. Although Republicans David Keelan and Dave Wissing and Democrats Ian Kennedy and Evan Coren do not share the same political philosophy, they all started local blogs based on politics or development, and they eventually connected and decided to collaborate.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 23, 2003
The way William Gmeinwieser Sr. sees it, the dream business he made a reality - building houses, a few a year - is in danger of being destroyed by a vote. The Howard County Council is contemplating eliminating an exemption that lets people cut one home lot off a piece of land without being held up by crowded schools or building caps. All other residential developments fall under the local growth-control law, the Adequate Public Facilities Ordinance. Gmeinwieser says small builders can't afford to pay interest on a loan for the several years or more it could take to get a building allocation and a less-cramped local school.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | September 2, 2002
The two Baltimore County attorneys seeking the Republican nomination for state attorney general - Jeffrey N. Pritzker of Phoenix and Edwin MacVaugh of Ruxton - face an uphill battle in their bid to unseat five-term incumbent J. Joseph Curran Jr. Even some within the state Republican Party concede that unseating Curran won't be easy. Neither prospective challenger has held elected office. Curran, who has been in office since 1987, faces no Democratic opposition in the Sept. 10 primary. And Maryland voters have not elected a Republican attorney general since 1919.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 3, 2002
WASHINGTON -- For months, Reps. Charles Bass and Rodney Frelinghuysen watched with anguish as the East Lawn of the Capitol was systematically stripped of its century-old trees to make way for the building of an underground visitors center. Every time the Republican congressmen returned from their districts in New Hampshire and New Jersey, they found more bald spaces in Frederick Law Olmsted's once elegant landscape. But when they heard of plans to topple a 175-year-old rare English elm -- because it was in the way of construction workers and more space was needed for House members to park -- the two decided to make a stand.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | April 18, 2002
The Republican race to replace Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. in Congress got a bit clearer yesterday when former legislator and two-time gubernatorial candidate Ellen R. Sauerbrey bowed out. Her decision, announced late yesterday afternoon, leaves two major contenders from the party: former U.S. Rep. Helen Delich Bentley and Del. James F. Ports Jr. Both said they would make their decisions within a few weeks. Gov. Parris N. Glendening radically reshaped the 2nd Congressional District in the redistricting process in an effort to make it more favorable to Democrats, specifically outgoing Baltimore County Executive C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 8, 1997
WASHINGTON -- In a vote that could signal the strength of environmentalism in Congress, the House rejected an effort yesterday to exempt all water-control projects from a law that protects endangered plants and wildlife.After a heated debate, the lawmakers voted 227-196 on a compromise bill to allow environmental regulations to be bypassed only for emergency repairs of dams and levees in federal disaster areas. The original bill's sponsors had sought to permit exemptions for virtually all projects that seek to control the flow of water.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Sun Staff Writer Staff writer Michael A. Fletcher contributed to this article | January 5, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Members of Maryland's delegation to Congress responded to yesterday's lavish and boisterous confirmation of Republican ascendancy on Capitol Hill with a lot of hope, a little uncertainty, and here and there a touch of apprehension."
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2002
Democrat C. Vernon Gray has held Howard County's District 2 County Council seat for so long that county Democrats may feel the east Columbia-Jessup district is theirs for the taking. But two Republicans, Ananta Hejeebu and Raymond J. Bly, are also competing to replace the five-term veteran. Three Democrats - Calvin B. Ball III, David A. Rakes and Michelle Williams are contending for their party's nomination. The two Republicans offer GOP voters a very distinct choice. Bly, 52, is a maverick - a longtime Jessup used-appliance dealer who sees himself as representative of the "mom-and-pop," older commercial culture in the U.S. 1 corridor - the one county officials are hoping will give way to more upscale businesses.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 25, 2000
WASHINGTON - After a rare but effective collaboration between President Clinton and Republican congressional leaders, the House voted with surprising ease yesterday to grant China permanent normal trade relations. The 237-197 vote sent the trade bill on to what is expected to be speedy approval in the Senate. It concluded the year's most contentious debate with a victory that Clinton viewed as perhaps his last chance to add luster to his legacy before he leaves office. "I have always believed that by opening markets abroad, we open opportunities at home, and we have worked hard to advance that goal," the president said afterward.
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