Advertisement
HomeCollectionsTwo Middle Schools
IN THE NEWS

Two Middle Schools

NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | March 7, 1996
Residents will be able to question county school planners tonight when the school system holds a briefing on proposals to relieve overcrowding at George Fox Middle School.The school board is looking at four options that would send some students now destined for George Fox to Chesapeake Bay Middle School and then to Northeast High School.George Fox is in the Northeast High School feeder system, and Chesapeake Middle is a Chesapeake High School feeder.The change probably would not take place until the school year that begins in September 1997.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | June 15, 1999
In preparation for tomorrow's vote, Anne Arundel County school board members last night closely examined Superintendent Carol S. Parham's $27 million plan to ease school crowding.Five of the eight board members listened and asked questions as Thomas W. Rhoades, director of school planning and programming, led them through the details of Parham's proposal."All we are asking you to do is give us some direction," Rhoades told them, "some options to study over the summer."Tomorrow night, the board will continue to discuss the plan and its ideas before voting on what options to give Parham's staff to work on. Later this year, the board will make a final decision.
NEWS
April 25, 2007
ISSUE: Eight Anne Arundel County public schools were locked down for several hours April 18 after a man wanted on attempted-murder charges showed up at a high school in women's clothing and asked to see a female student, authorities said. The man, thought by police to be Antonio Moore, 20, of Brooklyn Park drew the suspicion of the resource officer stationed at North County High School in Ferndale, who left the man to find the girl. The girl told him that she was not expecting a visitor.
NEWS
April 9, 1998
THE ANNE Arundel County Council this week institutionalized crowded elementary schools in a number of communities. Instead of supporting County Executive John G. Gary's effort to allow new home construction only near elementary schools that have space, the council Monday succumbed to the arguments of home builders.For the past year, the county planning office has not allowed home construction near elementary schools operating at 115 percent or more of their designed capacity. This policy put a stop to building in communities such as Davidsonville, where the elementary school operates at 21 percent over capacity or Pasadena, where Jacobsville and Fort Smallwood elementaries are at 40 percent over capacity or worse.
NEWS
December 18, 1992
BALTIMORE's Norplant consortium has drawn national attention, including a front-page story in the New York Times. Last Monday, the Times printed the following editorial, headlined "Baltimore's Lead in Contraception":"A girl who grows up in Baltimore, Md., has all too strong a chance of becoming a mother before she reaches adulthood. In 1990, one in 10 of the city's 15- to 17-year-olds gave birth."So it was welcome news two years ago when contraceptives became available at health clinics in . . . six high schools and two middle schools.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff writer | December 18, 1991
Instead of a sleigh and eight tiny reindeer, Santa will be at the helm of a 4x4 Chevrolet truck when he arrives in Hamlet, N.C., tonight.He'll be leaving here early this morning, with $5,000 worth of presents, for 16 girls and boys who face their first Christmas without parents.The children, who range in age from 5 to 18, were orphaned when afire destroyed a poultry-processing plant where their parents were working Sept. 3.Mayor W. Benjamin Brown, who is playing Santa in acity Public Works truck, said he should finish the nine-hour drive south "just in the nick of time" to distribute the gifts at a party for the children.
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Staff Writer | June 17, 1993
Baltimore's bold venture in letting a private firm run nine schools ended its first year with the superintendent in favor of expanding the program, the mayor lukewarm to the idea and parents and staff divided over whether it had been a success.The high-stakes initiative, which put the city in the vanguard of private-public partnerships in education, did well enough that Superintendent Walter G. Amprey said he favors expansion, perhaps as early as next fall."It's hard to find anybody who hasn't seen it as successful," Dr. Amprey said at a news conference held yesterday to describe the job done by Education Alternatives, Inc. "I think it's been successful enough for it to expand."
NEWS
February 2, 1995
The cornerstone of Maryland's ambitious school reform effort is accountability. But accountability without consequences is a charade.The consequences announced yesterday by state schools chief Nancy S. Grasmick brought no real surprises. Even so, the list of three Baltimore City schools earmarked for reconstitution and possible state intervention drew a loud protest from city officials. That protest does not ring true.Five years after the State Board of Education adopted benchmarks for academic performance, four years after the first school performance reports were issued and more than a year after guidelines for reconstitution efforts were put out for public comment and approved by the state board, city school officials now cry foul.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | September 24, 1997
Howard County school officials are hoping for up to $12 million from the state to help fund proposed capital projects for the fiscal year beginning July 1, a school official said.If approved, that figure would double what Howard received from the state for fiscal 1998 for building, expanding and renovating school facilities, Sydney L. Cousin, associate school superintendent for finance and operations, said last night.The county would provide the balance of the nearly $34 million sought by schools Superintendent Michael E. Hickey for capital improvements.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | April 2, 1999
County schools will begin a campaign next week to get parents involved in finding solutions to enrollment shifts and crowded classrooms.Starting Wednesday, school planning and construction officials will hold public briefings to answer questions and take suggestions on a consultant's report that recommends redistricting 3,500 students and expanding several schools.The recommendations are intended to accommodate the population shifts that, unchecked, would cause severe crowding at schools during the next 20 years, officials say.All forums will begin at 7 p.m. in the auditoriums of these schools: April 7 -- Arundel High School, 1001 Annapolis Road, Gambrills.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.