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NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | June 15, 1999
In preparation for tomorrow's vote, Anne Arundel County school board members last night closely examined Superintendent Carol S. Parham's $27 million plan to ease school crowding.Five of the eight board members listened and asked questions as Thomas W. Rhoades, director of school planning and programming, led them through the details of Parham's proposal."All we are asking you to do is give us some direction," Rhoades told them, "some options to study over the summer."Tomorrow night, the board will continue to discuss the plan and its ideas before voting on what options to give Parham's staff to work on. Later this year, the board will make a final decision.
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NEWS
April 25, 2007
ISSUE: Eight Anne Arundel County public schools were locked down for several hours April 18 after a man wanted on attempted-murder charges showed up at a high school in women's clothing and asked to see a female student, authorities said. The man, thought by police to be Antonio Moore, 20, of Brooklyn Park drew the suspicion of the resource officer stationed at North County High School in Ferndale, who left the man to find the girl. The girl told him that she was not expecting a visitor.
NEWS
April 9, 1998
THE ANNE Arundel County Council this week institutionalized crowded elementary schools in a number of communities. Instead of supporting County Executive John G. Gary's effort to allow new home construction only near elementary schools that have space, the council Monday succumbed to the arguments of home builders.For the past year, the county planning office has not allowed home construction near elementary schools operating at 115 percent or more of their designed capacity. This policy put a stop to building in communities such as Davidsonville, where the elementary school operates at 21 percent over capacity or Pasadena, where Jacobsville and Fort Smallwood elementaries are at 40 percent over capacity or worse.
NEWS
December 18, 1992
BALTIMORE's Norplant consortium has drawn national attention, including a front-page story in the New York Times. Last Monday, the Times printed the following editorial, headlined "Baltimore's Lead in Contraception":"A girl who grows up in Baltimore, Md., has all too strong a chance of becoming a mother before she reaches adulthood. In 1990, one in 10 of the city's 15- to 17-year-olds gave birth."So it was welcome news two years ago when contraceptives became available at health clinics in . . . six high schools and two middle schools.
NEWS
February 2, 1995
The cornerstone of Maryland's ambitious school reform effort is accountability. But accountability without consequences is a charade.The consequences announced yesterday by state schools chief Nancy S. Grasmick brought no real surprises. Even so, the list of three Baltimore City schools earmarked for reconstitution and possible state intervention drew a loud protest from city officials. That protest does not ring true.Five years after the State Board of Education adopted benchmarks for academic performance, four years after the first school performance reports were issued and more than a year after guidelines for reconstitution efforts were put out for public comment and approved by the state board, city school officials now cry foul.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | September 24, 1997
Howard County school officials are hoping for up to $12 million from the state to help fund proposed capital projects for the fiscal year beginning July 1, a school official said.If approved, that figure would double what Howard received from the state for fiscal 1998 for building, expanding and renovating school facilities, Sydney L. Cousin, associate school superintendent for finance and operations, said last night.The county would provide the balance of the nearly $34 million sought by schools Superintendent Michael E. Hickey for capital improvements.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | April 2, 1999
County schools will begin a campaign next week to get parents involved in finding solutions to enrollment shifts and crowded classrooms.Starting Wednesday, school planning and construction officials will hold public briefings to answer questions and take suggestions on a consultant's report that recommends redistricting 3,500 students and expanding several schools.The recommendations are intended to accommodate the population shifts that, unchecked, would cause severe crowding at schools during the next 20 years, officials say.All forums will begin at 7 p.m. in the auditoriums of these schools: April 7 -- Arundel High School, 1001 Annapolis Road, Gambrills.
NEWS
April 29, 2007
LAST WEEK'S ISSUE: -- Eight Anne Arundel County public schools were locked down for several hours April 18 after a man wanted on attempted murder charges showed up at a high school in women's clothing and asked to see a female student, authorities said. The man, thought by police to be Antonio Moore, 20, of Brooklyn Park drew the suspicion of the resource officer stationed at North County High School in Ferndale, who left the man to find the girl. The girl told him that she was not expecting a visitor.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Laura Loh and Julie Bykowicz and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | October 2, 2003
A 13-year-old Old Mill Middle School-North pupil told police that a stranger grabbed her, carried her into the woods and tried to sexually assault her yesterday morning, prompting school officials to issue a warning to parents of other young walkers. The incident shook parents and children in the neighborhood, where another Old Mill teen-ager, Lisa Kathleen Haenel, was stabbed to death a decade ago during her morning walk to school. That crime is unsolved. "These things are few and far between, but it only takes one time to end up like little Lisa," said parent Debbie Long, adding that she has never let either of her daughters walk to or from the campus of Old Mill middle and high schools in Millersville.
NEWS
July 9, 1993
No program in the modern history of the city school system has received the attention of Tesseract, Baltimore's bold venture in contracting education to a profit-making firm. Tesseract has come through its first academic year with generally positive marks. Schools are cleaner, computers costing million of dollars are in place and, most important, there are signs -- only signs -- that the grades of the 4,800 Tesseract students are on the upturn.Given the difficulties Education Alternatives Inc. encountered in getting Tesseract off the ground, this is a remarkable record for just nine months.
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