Advertisement
HomeCollectionsTwo Doctors
IN THE NEWS

Two Doctors

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1998
Ruthann Aron has brain damage and was unable to make sound judgments, said two doctors who saw her weeks after her arrest in June.Dr. Lawrence Kline testified yesterday that Aron, 55, has a "subtle abnormality" in her brain that could cause paranoia, impulsive behavior and inappropriate outbursts of temper.Kline is the director of the psychiatric unit at Suburban Hospital in Bethesda, where Aron was taken for testing and treatment in )) August. He said he ordered two types of brain scans after Aron told him she had once been thrown to the floor by her husband and lost consciousness.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2012
Cecil County's top prosecutor said Wednesday that he withdrew murder charges against two abortion doctors because he lacked definitive evidence that the fetuses at issue were terminated in Maryland. "We know what the doctors did. We just don't know where they did it," State's Attorney Edward "Ellis" D.E. Rollins III said, adding that charges could be reinstated. Rollins withdrew all charges Tuesday against Nicola I. Riley and Steven C. Brigham, doctors charged under Maryland's fetal homicide law for the death of fetuses that the prosecutor's office considered viable outside the womb.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Staff Writer | December 9, 1992
An Anne Arundel County jury yesterday awarded $3.5 million to an Edgewater sheet metal worker whose first wife died in 1986 after giving birth to the couple's son at Anne Arundel Medical Center.Richard S. Moy II was awarded damages after filing suit against two Annapolis obstetricians. He charged they misdiagnosed his wife Susan's condition before delivery, the cause of a seizure an hour after the Caesarean birth, and the ailment she suffered until she died six days later.The jury of seven men and five women heard 11 days of testimony by physicians from all over the country, then deliberated nine hours before finding Drs. Kenneth Keys and Lawrence Prichep negligent in their care of Mrs. Moy, who was 22 when she died.
NEWS
By DAVID KOHN and DAVID KOHN,SUN REPORTER | January 18, 2006
Maryland doctors who deal with end-of-life issues say that controlling patients' pain or depression often provides relief to those who ask about the possibility of physician-assisted suicide. But several doctors said very few patients raise the issue. "I don't get a lot of requests. It isn't common," said Dr. Tim Keay, who is director of palliative care at the University of Maryland Medical Center. He regularly deals with patients who have terminal illnesses and will die in a matter of months or weeks.
NEWS
February 9, 1994
A Glen Burnie woman filed a $140,000 suit in Anne Arundel Circuit Court yesterday against two doctors, alleging one made improper sexual advances toward her and the other prescribed excessive amounts of a drug.Linda J. Herlehy of the first block of Fox Chase Court alleges in the suit that Dr. Randy F. Davis and Dr. Daniel J. Freedenberg, both with offices in Glen Burnie, were negligent in their treatment of her between October 1987 and June 1991.The suit also names her husband, John P. Herlehy, as a plaintiff.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | June 2, 1995
Three years have passed since Tiffany Troch, the 13-year-old daughter of Mark and Debbie Troch and an honor student at Perry Hall Middle School, slipped eight feet from a rope swing and landed on a tree stump. It was April 16, 1992.The Troches drove their daughter to an emergency room. "We were on our way to GBMC [Greater Baltimore Medical Center] and we hit a bump and Tiffany yelled and we detoured to St. Joe's because it was closer," Mark Troch recalls. Tiffany, complaining of abdominal pains, walked into the emergency room at St. Joseph Medical Center at 5 o'clock.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 5, 2004
Harford County school officials said yesterday that a bus driver employed by a Forest Hill transportation contractor would no longer drive for the school system after two traffic incidents in the past week on his route. The driver, Russell L. Wagner, 77, of the 300 block of Willrich Circle in Forest Hill, was cleared by two doctors last week to drive for J.P.T. Transportation after recent heart bypass surgery, said schools spokesman Donald R. Morrison. But he was removed from his route April 29 by the contractor for erratic driving and then was involved in an early-morning accident Monday while transporting 27 students to Fallston Middle School, Morrison said.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | December 6, 1993
At first, it appeared that shock and grief drove Debbie and Mark Troch to ask all those questions, over and over again, and to obsess about the death of their teen-aged daughter. But it turns out the Troches were more rational than you'd expect parents in mourning to be. Their angry suspicions had considerable foundation, and their recollections of the last 13 1/2 hours of their daughter's life appear to have been all too accurate.Readers of this column might recall that the Troches came away from St. Joseph Hospital that Good Friday morning 1992 with lots of questions:Had they erred in bringing Tiffany to the Towson hospital the evening before, after she fell 8 feet from a rope swing near her home in Baltimore County?
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | May 16, 1994
Last Monday, the biggest news was David Letterman, leaving New York for a week to do some shows from Los Angeles. Tonight the biggest news is Jay Leno, who's arrived from the West Coast to do a week's worth of shows from New York.* "Final Analysis" (8:30-11 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- In the final analysis, "Final Analysis" was pretty stupid -- but with Richard Gere, Kim Basinger and Uma Thurman in the starring roles, this 1992 movie was easy on the eyes. NBC.* "One of Her Own" (9-11 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13)
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | September 8, 2002
Attorneys for an elderly Crofton woman and her three adult children who filed a medical negligence and wrongful-death lawsuit against doctors at Potomac Physicians in Annapolis, gave closing arguments in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court on Friday. The jury in the case, which is being heard in the courtroom of Judge David S. Bruce, will reconvene tomorrow. The plaintiffs are seeking about $500,000 for medical expenses plus other damages. In their complaint, Louise M. Hosey, 82, and her children charge that Potomac Physicians and two staff physicians failed to recognize and diagnose the condition of Walter J. Hosey Sr., her husband, when he arrived at the urgent care center April 8, 1997, complaining of chest pains.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2005
Dr. Elizabeth Raitz Cowboy spent a recent night making her rounds, checking on critically ill patients in intensive care. "You're looking much better today," Cowboy told a 69-year-old man with congestive heart failure, who waved a greeting and requested a snack. As the doctor promised to check his dietary restrictions, a worried nurse interrupted: A recently admitted patient was showing a welcome drop in blood pressure but a worrisome rise in heart rate. Cowboy peered at the new patient, quizzed the nurse, reviewed the medical chart, then switched the blood pressure medicine.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 5, 2004
Harford County school officials said yesterday that a bus driver employed by a Forest Hill transportation contractor would no longer drive for the school system after two traffic incidents in the past week on his route. The driver, Russell L. Wagner, 77, of the 300 block of Willrich Circle in Forest Hill, was cleared by two doctors last week to drive for J.P.T. Transportation after recent heart bypass surgery, said schools spokesman Donald R. Morrison. But he was removed from his route April 29 by the contractor for erratic driving and then was involved in an early-morning accident Monday while transporting 27 students to Fallston Middle School, Morrison said.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | August 5, 2003
WASHINGTON - An Army medical team is heading to Iraq to look into what caused 15 serious cases of pneumonia that include two deaths among troops in the region, the U.S. military said yesterday. The 15 cases, each of which required medical evacuation and use of a ventilator, were among about 100 cases of pneumonia that have been reported in the region since March 1, according to the Army Surgeon General's office. Three military personnel remain hospitalized at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany, with one of them on a ventilator, said Lyn Kukral, a spokeswoman for the surgeon general's office.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | September 8, 2002
Attorneys for an elderly Crofton woman and her three adult children who filed a medical negligence and wrongful-death lawsuit against doctors at Potomac Physicians in Annapolis, gave closing arguments in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court on Friday. The jury in the case, which is being heard in the courtroom of Judge David S. Bruce, will reconvene tomorrow. The plaintiffs are seeking about $500,000 for medical expenses plus other damages. In their complaint, Louise M. Hosey, 82, and her children charge that Potomac Physicians and two staff physicians failed to recognize and diagnose the condition of Walter J. Hosey Sr., her husband, when he arrived at the urgent care center April 8, 1997, complaining of chest pains.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 26, 2001
Two Baltimore physicians have been given the Distinguished Eagle Scout Award by the Baltimore Area Council of Boy Scouts of America in recognition of their contributions to society a quarter-century or more after attaining the rank of Eagle Scout. Recipients of the national award are Dr. J. Alex Haller Jr. and Dr. Robert A. Barish. Haller, 74, a retired pediatric surgeon who specialized in trauma care, was instrumental in the creation of the children's shock trauma center at Johns Hopkins Medical Center.
NEWS
By KATHY LALLY and KATHY LALLY,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 2, 1999
MOSCOW -- While Igor and Tatyana Myshkin were taking off their boots and putting on their hosts' slippers, the family was clearing the supper dishes from the kitchen table, making way for the operation.The family's two children went into a bedroom and turned their music up loud. They said they didn't want to hear the cat's screams.There was only one scream. It came from Tatyana. A moment before the little gray cat succumbed to the anesthetic, terror descended and she tried desperately to escape, badly clawing Tatyana, who had been gently holding and stroking her.An hour later, the cat had been spayed and the Myshkins were packing up their instruments, heading for their next appointment.
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN and KATE SHATZKIN,SUN STAFF | October 6, 1995
A Baltimore Circuit judge yesterday drastically limited a lawsuit brought by a nationally renowned husband-and-wife team of pediatric cardiologists, who allege they were lured into giving up tenured professorships for positions at the Johns Hopkins University only to be suddenly let go 10 months later.Yesterday's action restricts the suit to the question of whether the doctors, Sam Ritter and Rebecca Snider, had been appointed permanently at Hopkins when they were informed of their dismissals on Oct. 18, 1994, and whether the university breached its contract with them.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | April 11, 1998
After failing to raise enough money two years ago, two doctors are back with a plan to get doctors to buy shares in a medical group that would own its own HMO.Doctors have developed a number of ways over the past few years of organizing themselves to cope with an HMO world, such as organizing large groups to contract with health maintenance organizations or selling their practices to hospitals."
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | April 11, 1998
After failing to raise enough money two years ago, two doctors are back with a plan to get doctors to buy shares in a medical group that would own its own HMO.Doctors have developed a number of ways over the past few years of organizing themselves to cope with an HMO world, such as organizing large groups to contract with health maintenance organizations or selling their practices to hospitals."
NEWS
By Timothy Wheeler and Timothy Wheeler,SUN STAFF | March 23, 1998
Magnet the polar bear will have to draw crowds at the Baltimore Zoo by himself now. His popular female partner, Anana, died over the weekend.The 8-year-old bear, whose name means "beautiful" in the Inuit language, had been ill since Wednesday, said Jill J. Seipe, zoo spokeswoman.Dr. Mike Cranfield, the zoo's chief veterinarian, initially diagnosed the bear's inability to hold down food as an intestinal problem, but blood tests were inconclusive. Anana's condition worsened over the next two days, so Cranfield performed emergency exploratory surgery on her at the zoo, which occupies 160 acres in Druid Hill Park.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.