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By David Kusnet and David Kusnet,Special to the Sun | June 13, 1999
"Lead Us Into Temptation: The Triumph of American Materialism," by James B. Twitchell. Columbia University Press. 336 pages. $24.95.James B. Twitchell has a job that could exist only in today's America: teaching English and advertising at the University of Florida. And, with his earlier books, "Adcult USA" and "Carnival Culture," he became the nation's leading dissector and defender of commercial culture.Perhaps because he's searching for something new to say, Twitchell's latest work, "Lead Us Into Temptation," is really two books in one. The best parts are an entertaining and insightful history of American commercialism, from the emergence of advertising in newspapers and magazines, radio and television, to the development of the supermarket, packaged products such as Wonder Bread and mass marketing of expensive luxury items of all kinds.
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NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,[Special to The Sun] | October 28, 2007
Shopping for God How Christianity Went From In Your Heart To In Your Face By James B. Twitchell Simon & Schuster / 324 pages / $26 Since houses of worship "don't offer back-to-church specials or package deals to heaven," advertising executive John Follis admits, many Americans may think it "strange to market a church like a box of Kellogg's Frosted Mini-Wheats." But even with "all the product attributes, God is still a tough sell. That's why it's critical that the church have a kick-ass Web site."
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NEWS
By William K. Marimow and William K. Marimow,SUN STAFF | November 9, 1997
"For Shame - The Loss of Decency in American Culture," by James B. Twitchell. St. Martin's Press. 208 pages. $21.95.As Professor James B. Twitchell views America in the last decade of the 20th century, our social fabric has unraveled: It's a world of illegitimate children, unwed mothers, negligent fathers, escalating violence, pathetic public schools and rampant addictions - to drugs, alcohol, sex and gambling.In Twitchell's America people like O.J. Simpson, Madonna, Mike Tyson and Joey Buttafuoco, who should be censured by society, get the glory, while those who believe in a world in which morality, ethicality and civility predominate become devalued.
NEWS
By Don Aucoin and Don Aucoin,Boston Globe | January 28, 2007
Once upon a time, snobbery was a bad thing, a character flaw indulged in by effete elites and condemned by everyone else. But is snobbery going mainstream? Are snob appeal and mass appeal converging? The recent holiday season confirmed that many of us have begun "behaving as if we're rich," in the words of author James Twitchell. The country is on a status binge that has made the quest for luxury goods the new national pastime. And the rules of the game evidently are: No guilt, no limits.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | May 7, 2000
"Twenty Ads That Shook the World" by James B. Twitchell (Crown, 229 pages, $25) Subtitled "The Century's Most Groundbreaking Advertising and How It Changed Us All," this is an immensely entertaining and seriously provocative piece of work. Beginning with P.T. Barnum ("Prince of Humbug"), Twitchell devotes 10 pages or more to the history, theory and impact of 20 major ad concepts and campaigns. There is Pepsodent ("Claude Hopkins and the Magic of the Preemptive Claim"), Coke and Christmas ("The Claus That Refreshes")
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | February 24, 2002
Twenty Ads that Shook the World: The Century's Most Groundbreaking Advertising and How it Changed Us All, by James B. Twitchell (Three Rivers Press, 229 pages, $14). It begins with a poster for "P.T. Barnum's Own and Only Greatest Show on Earth" (mid-1800s), moves on to a newspaper advertisement for Lydia Pinkham's Vegetable Compound (1880s) and ends with "Michael Jordan: The Hero as Product." In all, Twitchell explores 20 advertisements or advertising campaigns that he convincingly argues became defining parts of U.S. common culture.
NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,[Special to The Sun] | October 28, 2007
Shopping for God How Christianity Went From In Your Heart To In Your Face By James B. Twitchell Simon & Schuster / 324 pages / $26 Since houses of worship "don't offer back-to-church specials or package deals to heaven," advertising executive John Follis admits, many Americans may think it "strange to market a church like a box of Kellogg's Frosted Mini-Wheats." But even with "all the product attributes, God is still a tough sell. That's why it's critical that the church have a kick-ass Web site."
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Evening Sun Staff | December 5, 1990
"Carpetbagger from Vermont, the autobiography of Marshall Harvey Twitchell," edited by Ted Tunnell, 216 pages, Louisiana State University Press, Baton Rouge, La.MARSHALL Harvey Twitchell joined the Union Army for about the same reasons any soldier enlists: an uneasy mixture of %o patriotism, idealism and naivete.And he'd have "the opportunity of visiting New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington and Richmond at the expense of the government."He was 21 years old, had been valedictorian at his high school in Townshend, Vt., and regularly attended the Congregational Church.
NEWS
By George F. Will | July 10, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Advertising, which is as American as French fries, English muffins and Chinese takeout, saturates society with an incessant barrage. Most people develop mental filters to soften the sensory blitzkrieg, lest they go bonkers, and they respond to the barrage with boredom, which is a kind of criticism.However, bored or not by advertising that assails eye, ear and even nose (some magazines contain scent strips advertising colognes), people are collaborators with the perpetrators of it. So argues James Twitchell in an essay published in WQ, the invaluable quarterly of the irreplaceable Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars.
NEWS
By Don Aucoin and Don Aucoin,Boston Globe | January 28, 2007
Once upon a time, snobbery was a bad thing, a character flaw indulged in by effete elites and condemned by everyone else. But is snobbery going mainstream? Are snob appeal and mass appeal converging? The recent holiday season confirmed that many of us have begun "behaving as if we're rich," in the words of author James Twitchell. The country is on a status binge that has made the quest for luxury goods the new national pastime. And the rules of the game evidently are: No guilt, no limits.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | February 24, 2002
Twenty Ads that Shook the World: The Century's Most Groundbreaking Advertising and How it Changed Us All, by James B. Twitchell (Three Rivers Press, 229 pages, $14). It begins with a poster for "P.T. Barnum's Own and Only Greatest Show on Earth" (mid-1800s), moves on to a newspaper advertisement for Lydia Pinkham's Vegetable Compound (1880s) and ends with "Michael Jordan: The Hero as Product." In all, Twitchell explores 20 advertisements or advertising campaigns that he convincingly argues became defining parts of U.S. common culture.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | May 7, 2000
"Twenty Ads That Shook the World" by James B. Twitchell (Crown, 229 pages, $25) Subtitled "The Century's Most Groundbreaking Advertising and How It Changed Us All," this is an immensely entertaining and seriously provocative piece of work. Beginning with P.T. Barnum ("Prince of Humbug"), Twitchell devotes 10 pages or more to the history, theory and impact of 20 major ad concepts and campaigns. There is Pepsodent ("Claude Hopkins and the Magic of the Preemptive Claim"), Coke and Christmas ("The Claus That Refreshes")
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Kusnet and David Kusnet,Special to the Sun | June 13, 1999
"Lead Us Into Temptation: The Triumph of American Materialism," by James B. Twitchell. Columbia University Press. 336 pages. $24.95.James B. Twitchell has a job that could exist only in today's America: teaching English and advertising at the University of Florida. And, with his earlier books, "Adcult USA" and "Carnival Culture," he became the nation's leading dissector and defender of commercial culture.Perhaps because he's searching for something new to say, Twitchell's latest work, "Lead Us Into Temptation," is really two books in one. The best parts are an entertaining and insightful history of American commercialism, from the emergence of advertising in newspapers and magazines, radio and television, to the development of the supermarket, packaged products such as Wonder Bread and mass marketing of expensive luxury items of all kinds.
NEWS
By William K. Marimow and William K. Marimow,SUN STAFF | November 9, 1997
"For Shame - The Loss of Decency in American Culture," by James B. Twitchell. St. Martin's Press. 208 pages. $21.95.As Professor James B. Twitchell views America in the last decade of the 20th century, our social fabric has unraveled: It's a world of illegitimate children, unwed mothers, negligent fathers, escalating violence, pathetic public schools and rampant addictions - to drugs, alcohol, sex and gambling.In Twitchell's America people like O.J. Simpson, Madonna, Mike Tyson and Joey Buttafuoco, who should be censured by society, get the glory, while those who believe in a world in which morality, ethicality and civility predominate become devalued.
NEWS
By George F. Will | July 10, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Advertising, which is as American as French fries, English muffins and Chinese takeout, saturates society with an incessant barrage. Most people develop mental filters to soften the sensory blitzkrieg, lest they go bonkers, and they respond to the barrage with boredom, which is a kind of criticism.However, bored or not by advertising that assails eye, ear and even nose (some magazines contain scent strips advertising colognes), people are collaborators with the perpetrators of it. So argues James Twitchell in an essay published in WQ, the invaluable quarterly of the irreplaceable Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Evening Sun Staff | December 5, 1990
"Carpetbagger from Vermont, the autobiography of Marshall Harvey Twitchell," edited by Ted Tunnell, 216 pages, Louisiana State University Press, Baton Rouge, La.MARSHALL Harvey Twitchell joined the Union Army for about the same reasons any soldier enlists: an uneasy mixture of %o patriotism, idealism and naivete.And he'd have "the opportunity of visiting New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington and Richmond at the expense of the government."He was 21 years old, had been valedictorian at his high school in Townshend, Vt., and regularly attended the Congregational Church.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | August 22, 2003
The followers of Eckankar, the religion of the light and sound of God, believe peace can be just a short word away. Every Sunday, a small group meets in Columbia to reach deeper states of consciousness through contemplative spiritual exercises. Sitting on folding chairs in a circle, a hum begins, grows to a crescendo into a deep, sustained tone. The Eckists are chanting "Hu" - pronounced "Hue" - an ancient word that they believe has spiritual power and describe as "a love song to God." Eckists chant Hu "to attune themselves with higher frequencies of God," said Matthew Silver of Columbia, an Eckankar clergy member.
NEWS
February 13, 2014
Domestic natural gas supply has increased enough to reduce the wholesale price to well below what foreign markets would offer for it. So Dominion and other corporate "players" as they call themselves want to send our natural gas overseas. The increased demand would increase domestic prices enough to support new fracking "plays" comparable to expansion during the original Marcellus Shale boom. The flip side includes those price increases showing up in heating and energy costs throughout North America.
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