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Twister

NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2011
Some of the violent winds that snapped and toppled trees in sections of Harford County Sunday afternoon were small tornadoes, the National Weather Service determined Tuesday. Damage surveys rated the twisters at EF-0, the weakest category. There were no reports of injuries or structural damage. Surveyors also found widespread evidence of powerful straight-line winds that caused damage to trees only. The first tornado struck at 4:07 p.m. just north of the town of Street, and traveled on the ground for 1.7 miles.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 8, 1993
PETERSBURG, Va. -- No warning was issued before a tornado destroyed this city's historic district Friday because no volunteer weather observers spotted it in time and because an updated radar system had not yet been installed, a National Weather Service official said yesterday. The tornado killed four people and injured 190.The weather service, a federal agency, issued the warning at 1:35 p.m., based on police reports of damage and sightings in a nearby town, said the official, Valerie J. Thompson, a meteorologist in Sterling, Va.Mayor Rosalyn R. Dance of Petersburg said at a news conference yesterday morning, "There was a tornado warning, but it reached us at least five minutes after the tornado had hit."
NEWS
By TONYA MAXWELL AND JOSH NOEL and TONYA MAXWELL AND JOSH NOEL,THE CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 7, 2005
EVANSVILLE, Ind. -- Hearing the winds whip outside his mobile home and the sound of breaking glass, Dustin Watts ordered his wife to get in the bathtub and then went to get his sons, ages 5 and 2. Watts, 28, doesn't know what happened next. But he thinks the tornado that killed at least 22 people when it struck northern Kentucky and southern Indiana early yesterday tossed his home into the air. "I don't know if it flipped over, but it felt like it did," Watts said as he sat on concrete steps that used to lead to his trailer but connected to nothing yesterday afternoon.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2002
Is Maryland experiencing an epidemic of twisters? Yesterday made the fourth time in the past 16 days that tornadoes were either spotted on radar or on the ground. It's hard not to wonder whether all this twisting is normal. "There's nothing strange about it. It's just the way the weather's been working," said Heidi Sonen, a meteorologist at Penn State University. Maryland has been experiencing a recurring weather pattern that's "perfect for severe storms," said Sonen. But what is clear is that in the past decade, more tornadoes have rolled through the state than at any other time since meteorologists began keeping records, said Barbara McNaught Watson of the National Weather Service's Baltimore-Washington forecast office.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 9, 1999
DEL CITY, Okla. -- President Clinton brought personal solace and the promise of federal financial aid yesterday to tornado survivors in Oklahoma, where devastating twisters killed 41 people and caused more than $600 million in property losses Monday.On a walking tour of the hard-hit Frolic Meadows neighborhood southwest of Oklahoma City, the president spent 90 minutes embracing residents and offering his sympathy.Tammy Weston, a mother of three whose family "lost it all" when the storm hit, said the president's words of consolation "made us feel better, actually."
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | February 24, 1998
KISSIMMEE, Fla. -- One minute, Maria Quadros was watching a wrestling match on television. The next instant she was lying on the floor of her mobile home in the Ponderosa Park campground, watching most of her belongings swirling in the air around her."It happened so fast, but it seemed like an eternity," she said. "Everything was flying around, glass, pictures off the walls, papers, coffee cups, everything. It felt like a horror movie."But the worst part of yesterday morning was just starting for Quadros, who has worked as a manager of the popular 180-space campground for the past two years.
SPORTS
By Scott Duncan and Scott Duncan,Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2009
WEST SPRINGFIELD, Mass. -Little drama remained as the Blast entered the fourth quarter of last night's game against the Massachusetts Twisters. With Baltimore's 10th victory all but complete, the only uncertainty was whether the Blast would eclipse the 20-point mark - one it had surpassed in three previous meetings with the Twisters.That was accomplished quickly as the Blast poured in three goals in the first five minutes of the final quarter as it routed the Twisters, 23-9, at the Eastern States Coliseum.
NEWS
By P.J. Huffstutter and P.J. Huffstutter,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 22, 2004
UTICA, Ill. - Dust and soot lined Mary Paulak's face in thick streaks yesterday, but she didn't notice as she wearily wandered through her decimated hometown. When a tornado tore through this village of 1,000 people Tuesday evening, eight residents who had run to their favorite tavern for safety were crushed to death when the century-old building collapsed. At least 10 people had to be taken to hospitals for injuries. Businesses along the town's two-block main street were destroyed, and the streets were covered ankle-deep with crumbled brick and shredded tree branches.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, Laura Barnhardt and Jeff Barker and Scott Calvert, Laura Barnhardt and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | April 30, 2002
LA PLATA - The tornado that roared across Southern Maryland on Sunday night, killing three people, was the worst twister in state history, the National Weather Service reported yesterday. And it showed. Stunned residents and elected officials who surveyed the damage in Charles and Calvert counties yesterday saw a church with its white steeple snapped off, a bank with the letters of its corporate name ripped from the wall, and pile after pile of rubble that had been someone's home or business.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | September 26, 2001
COLLEGE PARK - When the tornado struck, the rescuers became the rescued. The triple-wide trailer that housed the Maryland Fire and Rescue Institute was reduced to rubble Monday night as the powerful twister slammed into the University of Maryland campus. Remarkably, all seven people in the building about 5:20 p.m. survived. But tragedy struck home when staff members learned that one of their own, Deputy Director F. Patrick Marlatt, had lost two daughters to the killer storm. Staff members and visitors were struck by the awful irony that Maryland's leading institution for teaching disaster response should be at the center of its own disaster.
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