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By Donna Ellis | September 15, 2011
Howard County can be proud of the fact that there are a number of interesting little individually owned eateries that provide sustenance for locals who live a tad outside the plethora of "usual" Columbia and Main Street, Ellicott City, haunts. Such a "hidden" treasure is the Twist and Turn Tavern in the Highland Crossing Center, which is basically at the crossroads of routes 108 and 216. The Tavern is just over two years old now, and while it is enjoying a certain success, the four owners have hired (read: "strongarmed" )
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BUSINESS
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2014
Customers of Towson's artisan bakery La Cakerie could easily mistake their surroundings for an enlarged dollhouse kitchen; high-pitched strains of pop music bounce off pink walls and the aroma of baking cake batter wafts through the air. Owner and executive chef Jason Hisley opened the West Allegheny Avenue location seven months ago, relocating from nearby West Chesapeake Avenue and joining La Cakerie's sales location in Mount Vernon. Listening to suggestions from a new crop of busy working professionals, Hisley expanded La Cakerie from its pastry roots.
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NEWS
By Janet Gilbert and Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2010
S ometimes you can look at your life almost objectively. In these rare instances, you are permitted to pause and reflect a moment about what is really important. Some people have these epiphanies when they least expect it - at baseball games or in the shower or on long nature hikes. I suppose that's just happened to me. Over the past two weekends, for the better part of both Saturdays, my husband and I have attended funerals. Ordinarily, funerals do not come to mind as an appropriate subject for my column, but I think things happen for a reason - and the reason I am writing this week's column about funerals is they have a message for the living.
HEALTH
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2014
Three months ago, Cindy Colvin could barely walk. Shopping sprees to feed her "first addiction, retail" were out of the question, as were the essentials - getting groceries, tending to household chores and making it into work. "I didn't know how to walk anymore," said Colvin, 55. "I wasn't walking like a normal person. Just to take a step, every single step, was agony. " With knees so swollen she "couldn't remember normal" and a constant throbbing throughout both legs, the Avondale, Pa., resident drove an hour and a half to Baltimore to see OrthoMaryland's Dr. Barry Waldman, who promised a new life made possible by 3D printing.
SPORTS
By KEVIN ECK | November 9, 2008
Jeff Hardy seemed to be sliding back to his former role of being the company's most popular mid-carder. Rather than taking his near misses at the WWE title in stride, Hardy came out swinging Friday night on SmackDown. His frustration boiling over, Hardy wielded a chair to show he wasn't taking a back seat to anyone in his ongoing quest for the title. A desperate Hardy willing to use extreme measures to get what he wants adds a new layer to his character and is a logical progression of his story line.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | February 5, 1995
Oliver's Twist went down to his first defeat at Gulfstream Park on Friday, but his trainer, Billy Boniface, is undeterred in his plans to run the Maryland-bred colt in two weeks in the Grade II Fountain of Youth Stakes."
FEATURES
By VIDA ROBERTS | January 31, 1993
The modern woman needn't cut the laces and ribbons that are tied to styles of the past; she can tie them into the way she lives today.Baltimore designer Kate Burch has done just that. For the past two years, Ms. Burch has been creating one-of-a-kind hats from her studio at the Mill Centre. Now she has expanded to clothing design and into a new shop called Magpie, in Mount Washington Village.The magpie is a bird addicted to indiscriminate hoarding of bright bits and pieces, a habit Ms. Burch indulged in her work with theater and vintage clothing.
SPORTS
By Pete Bielski and Pete Bielski,Special to The Sun | November 20, 1994
An airplane shuttle service introduced Charles Oliver to an inner circle of Maryland horsemen. However, it has been a homebred 2-year-old that is making Oliver a regular to a more coveted circle.Oliver's Twist, the first racehorse owned by Oliver, sped to victory in the $60,000 Rollicking Stakes yesterday at Laurel Park, taking Oliver to the winner's circle for the second time this month."I didn't expect two wins in two starts, that's for sure," said Oliver, 55, a full-time insurance man and part-time charter pilot from Bel Air. "Actually, I was just hoping to get my first start."
NEWS
By Rona Hirsch and Rona Hirsch,Contributing Writer | February 26, 1993
In one week, you can "Hooka Tooka" like you did last summer.You could also "Twist," "Limbo Rock" and "Hucklebuck," because the man who performed those hits and revolutionized the dance floor is coming to Ellicott City.Chubby Checker will present a "Rock and Roll Dance Party" with his band, The Wildcats, March 5 at Turf Valley Hotel and Country Club, singing several of his biggest numbers and pop rock classics from the last four decades.Mr. Checker, who put 23 songs on Billboard's Top 40 chart, including nine on the Top 10, achieved what no parent could.
FEATURES
By Sarah Kickler Kelber and Sarah Kickler Kelber,Sun Columnist | January 30, 2007
The major twist on this season of The Apprentice has been dividing the teams into "haves" and "have-nots" by forcing the losing team to sleep in tents outside the mansion where the winning team is living it up. On Sunday's episode, members of undefeated Kinetic muffed their task big time, meaning they not only lost but also had to move to the outdoors camp for the first time. While the just desserts were fun to watch, it was also nice to see Arrow finally win (thanks to the efforts of project manager Aaron, who is from Columbia)
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2014
Anne Arundel Community College's Opera AACC concludes its five-performance run of Charles Bizet's "Carmen" at 8 p.m. Saturday, June 28, at Robert Kauffman Theater in the Pascal Center for Performing Arts. One of the world's most popular operas, "Carmen" got a twist in this production with dance movement integrated in a tale "told through a feminist lens," according to the program notes. It's an approach that may not reflect everyone's conception of how Bizet's masterwork should be presented, but the production was indeed worthwhile.
NEWS
By Allison Eatough | April 2, 2014
With whiskey barrel chairs, rows of colored glass bottles and mismatched antique teacups reminiscent of a Mad Hatter tea party, Twisted Teahouse is not your traditional teahouse. The Savage Mill business is half tea boutique, half consignment shop and host to tea parties both on and off site.   Angela Vogel, a mother of two and home day care provider, opened Twisted Teahouse in December after years of collecting antique teacups and hosting English-style tea parties in her Severn home.
NEWS
Leonard Pitts Jr and Leonard Pitts Jr | March 27, 2014
What excuses will they make this time? Meaning that cadre of letters-to-the-editor writers and conservative pundits who so reliably say such stupid things whenever the subject is race. Indeed, race is the third rail of American conscience; to touch it is to be zapped by rationalizations, justifications and lies that defy reason, but that some must embrace to preserve for themselves the fiction of liberty and justice for all. Otherwise, they'd have to face the fact that advantage and disadvantage, health and sickness, wealth and poverty, life and death, are still parceled out according to melanin content of skin.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2014
Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet" is perhaps the world's best-known love story - a tragic tale of forbidden love between teenagers from warring families. Consequently, any producer offering his or her own presentation must bring new insight and a fresh approach, a tough act for a story that has withstood the ages. Aware of this daunting challenge, Compass Rose Theater founding artistic director Lucinda Merry-Browne, who serves in its production of "Romeo and Juliet" as producer and director, noted the necessity of "creating a production that would tell the story in an authentic and powerful way. " Convinced that "Romeo and Juliet" is suited to Compass Rose's teaching mission, Merry-Browne cast very young actors in the title roles - 14-year-old Sydney Maloney as Juliet and 17-year-old Eli Pendry as Romeo.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For the Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2014
It's not often you hear of a traditional Irish band that features the name of an impoverished African nation in its title. But the Tanzania Ceili Band, which performs lively Irish music for social dancing, isn't your average group. The seven-member band was formed to raise money to build a medical clinic, Catholic school and orphanage in a remote region of Tanzania in East Africa. The musicians bolster the fundraising efforts of the Tanzanian Children's Project, a nonprofit formed five years ago by Knights of Columbus Columbia Council 7559.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2014
Barbara Block of Berrien Springs, Mich., was searching for a recipe for Rice Krispies treat ice cream bars that she said were very popular in the 1960s. Rose Barnes of South Bend, Ind., sent in a recipe that she started making years ago with her children and now enjoys making with her grandkids. She was sure it was the one Block was looking for. Kellogg's Rice Krispies cereal hit store shelves in the 1920s and was a success with adults. However, the breakfast cereal's real popularity with kids didn't come until more than a decade later, when Rice Krispies treats were created by a Kellogg's employee, Mildred Day. She mixed the cereal with butter and marshmallows, and an instant sensation was born . This recipe is proof that Rice Krispie treats can be easily adapted and used in many different ways, and are surely as popular today as they have always been.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | September 25, 1994
For a couple of moments, Dennis Carr felt his Grade I mount, Twist Afleet, struggling yesterday on the backstretch of Pimlico Race Course and thought the horse was in trouble.Twist Afleet had torn off a front shoe, but in the true fashion of a legitimate 4-5 favorite, the filly continued on gamely and won the $100,000 Columbia Stakes by three quarters of a length over her New York-based rival, Penny's Reshoot.Normally a front-runner, Twist Afleet didn't have a smooth trip. Outrun early partly because of the shoe trouble, Carr had to angle the horse out from the rail on the final turn and go three horses wide.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 2, 2005
Bobby McFerrin is back at the Meyerhoff for another collaboration with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, this one devoted largely to Mozart. The program, which repeats tonight, is part of the BSO's Symphony With a Twist series. It could use a little more twist. Although there will always be some folks getting their first exposure to McFerrin's distinctive, crowd-pleasing brand of vocalism during the obligatory improvisation portion of his concerts, and others who will never tire of hearing it, the rest of us could use a fresh idea or two. Funny how most classical music types are struggling with ways to enliven 200-year-old concert formats.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper and The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2014
Oscar watchers were surprised when "Alone Yet Not Alone," the theme from a little-known Christian movie of the same name was nominated for best original song.  Now, in a surprising twist, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is revoking the song's nomination, citing inappropriate behavior by the song's composer. The song is sung by Joni Eareckson Tada, a Maryland native, prolific Christian author and disability advocate. A diving accident in the Chesapeake Bay left Eareckson Tada paralyzed from the neck down shortly after she graduated from Woodlawn High School.
NEWS
January 25, 2014
If you are like most of us living in the Baltimore area, you are probably sick of hearing about what a disgrace the city's speed camera program turned out to be - about the high error rate, about the slow response of city government to the problem and perhaps even about the stonewalling and vague explanations of exactly how it went so terribly wrong. We're sick of it. Our readers are sick of it. And it's probably the case that most everyone in City Hall from Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake on down to the youngest clerk-typist is tired of thinking about this embarrassment, too. Yet the latest revelation - one that the Rawlings-Blake administration clearly didn't want anyone to know about - is that the whole thing was even worse than previously reported.
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