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NEWS
August 7, 1997
Mount Airy Town Council rejected a request for a school crossing guard from residents of the Twin Ridge subdivision.However, the council agreed to install four-way stop signs at two intersections and add painted crosswalks on side streets.The request for a crossing guard was prompted by a decision by the Frederick County Board of Education to end bus service within a half-mile radius of Twin Ridge Elementary School. The children were bused to school last year."We can't provide crossing guards without raising taxes," Council President R. Delaine Hobbs told parents at Monday night's council meeting.
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NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2004
MOUNT AIRY - Pressed by federal law, educators for more than three decades have worked hard to assure equal opportunity for girls - to the point of upbraiding teachers for not calling on girls as often as boys. But now the tables are turning. Twin Ridge Elementary School in southeast Frederick County is about to turn the spotlight on the less gentle sex. Beginning this fall, the school will create boys-only classrooms in the fourth and fifth grades in hopes of closing a worrisome gender gap. "I wanted to do this because boys are in trouble, not only in this school, but in this state and in the nation," said H. Peter Storm, principal of the school, which serves a development of expensive homes in a far suburb of Baltimore and Washington.
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NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | December 16, 1992
Neighborhood centers -- designated areas allowing a mix of houses and businesses -- will remain in Mount Airy's proposed master plan.However, a 20-acre tract near the Twin Ridge development will not be designated as a neighborhood center, as initially proposed in the blueprint.The Mount Airy Planning and Zoning Commission removed the designation last night after some residents objected."Put [neighborhood centers] out there where we don't have people," urged John McCumber, a Twin Ridge resident who was among a dozen people at the workshop.
NEWS
August 7, 1997
Mount Airy Town Council rejected a request for a school crossing guard from residents of the Twin Ridge subdivision.However, the council agreed to install four-way stop signs at two intersections and add painted crosswalks on side streets.The request for a crossing guard was prompted by a decision by the Frederick County Board of Education to end bus service within a half-mile radius of Twin Ridge Elementary School. The children were bused to school last year."We can't provide crossing guards without raising taxes," Council President R. Delaine Hobbs told parents at Monday night's council meeting.
NEWS
By Kathy Sutphin and Kathy Sutphin,Contributing Writer | August 26, 1992
MOUNT AIRY -- When Twin Ridge Elementary opens for classes Aug. 31, it will become a melting pot for hundreds of students redistricted from four schools in two counties.The new school, which is nestled in the rolling hills between Route 144, Prospect Road and Leafy Hollow Circle, is the first Frederick County public school within Mount Airy's town limits.Construction of the $6.8 million facility began last August by general contractor H.A. Harris Inc. of Baltimore, said Daniel Gadra, superintendent of Planning and Facilities for Frederick County Public Schools.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Sun Staff Writer | December 9, 1994
Twin Ridge resident Bob Beckwith has nothing against baseball, but he doesn't want to live across the street from a ball field surrounded by six, 70-foot high floodlights."
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | March 21, 1996
Old and new Mount Airy clashed in a courtroom yesterday as homeowners in the Twin Ridge development told a Frederick County circuit judge how a lighted ball field disrupted their lives while town officials repeatedly ignored their complaints.In the first day of testimony in their civil suit against the town of Mount Airy, Twin Ridge residents said that the presence of six, 70-foot stadium lights surrounding a baseball field and ball games have brought unwanted glare, trash, noise and traffic to their neighborhood of $200,000 homes.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Sun Staff Writer | April 28, 1995
A new era of night baseball was ushered into Mount Airy this week as town officials flipped the switch on a set of controversial light towers that have divided some residents and local ball players."
NEWS
By Daniel P. Clemens Jr. and Daniel P. Clemens Jr.,Staff writer | October 20, 1991
A deal for new athletic fields adjacent to the Twin Ridge ElementarySchool has been hammered out by town administrators and Frederick County officials.Frederick County will pay for and build five recreational fields at the school, which is under construction and scheduled to open next fall.Plans call for two ball diamonds, two soccer-football-lacrosse fields, and one combination facility that will feature both a diamond and an overlapping rectangular field.For a town that has been looking to improve recreational facilities, the notion of the new facilities at Twin Ridge was welcomed by Mount Airy officials.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2004
MOUNT AIRY - Pressed by federal law, educators for more than three decades have worked hard to assure equal opportunity for girls - to the point of upbraiding teachers for not calling on girls as often as boys. But now the tables are turning. Twin Ridge Elementary School in southeast Frederick County is about to turn the spotlight on the less gentle sex. Beginning this fall, the school will create boys-only classrooms in the fourth and fifth grades in hopes of closing a worrisome gender gap. "I wanted to do this because boys are in trouble, not only in this school, but in this state and in the nation," said H. Peter Storm, principal of the school, which serves a development of expensive homes in a far suburb of Baltimore and Washington.
NEWS
July 14, 1997
Mount Airy town government plans to appeal for reimbursement of its legal expenses in defending a lawsuit over ball field lights, a claim the town's insurance company has denied.The town spent about $26,000 in a successful defense of a suit filed in 1994 by eight families in Twin Ridge subdivision. The suit claimed that lights at the Twin Ridge Elementary School baseball field interfered with their lives, causing a nuisance and devaluing their properties.The Local Government Insurance Trust claims committee denied Mount Airy's request for reimbursement without explanation, town attorney Richard C. Murray said.
NEWS
May 15, 1996
A Frederick Circuit Court judge has denied a request by Twin Ridge homeowners to tighten the restrictions he imposed last month governing a lighted ball field in their neighborhood.Sixteen Twin Ridge homeowners, who have waged a two-year legal battle over the lights, filed a motion April 19 seeking more limits on youth baseball games played at the field across the street from their $200,000 homes.Last week, Frederick Circuit Judge John H. Tisdale denied the homeowners' request to ban night games on Saturday and Sunday, ban parking on adjacent streets, limit floodlight wattage and set up an enforcement system for the new rules.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | May 8, 1996
Sixteen residents of a Mount Airy subdivision are renewing their two-year legal battle against the floodlights on ball fields across the street from their $200,000 homes.The return to court quashes hopes for an amicable resolution to a dispute town officials thought ended with a five-day trial in Frederick County Circuit Court in March.The lights have pitted Twin Ridge neighbors against the town and the youth leagues that use the Twin Ridge Elementary School ball fields. Residents complained of noise, traffic, trash and glare from lights.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | April 12, 1996
The floodlights surrounding a Mount Airy baseball field will remain despite a legal challenge from a group of homeowners who claimed they destroyed the serenity of their neighborhood.Frederick County Circuit Judge John H. Tisdale said he believed the lights had disrupted the lives of Twin Ridge residents and imposed restrictions on when they can be used. However, he concluded that the benefits of the ball field outweigh the concerns of the 16 homeowners.The judge ruled in a dispute that has divided some longtime Mount Airy residents and newcomers to the town.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | March 26, 1996
Mount Airy had planned a lighted baseball field at Twin Ridge Elementary School since the late 1980s, town officials said yesterday in the fourth day of testimony in a civil lawsuit brought by neighbors who say they can't live with the field's powerful lights."
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | March 21, 1996
Old and new Mount Airy clashed in a courtroom yesterday as homeowners in the Twin Ridge development told a Frederick County circuit judge how a lighted ball field disrupted their lives while town officials repeatedly ignored their complaints.In the first day of testimony in their civil suit against the town of Mount Airy, Twin Ridge residents said that the presence of six, 70-foot stadium lights surrounding a baseball field and ball games have brought unwanted glare, trash, noise and traffic to their neighborhood of $200,000 homes.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | March 26, 1996
Mount Airy had planned a lighted baseball field at Twin Ridge Elementary School since the late 1980s, town officials said yesterday in the fourth day of testimony in a civil lawsuit brought by neighbors who say they can't live with the field's powerful lights."
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Sun Staff Writer | July 15, 1994
Until April of this year, residents of Twin Ridge were quietly enjoying their community of $200,000 homes.Then construction began on a warehouse for heavy excavating equipment on land next to Twin Ridge, on the Frederick County side of Mount Airy.And residents learned that 70-foot tower lights were going to be installed at the neighborhood sports field.Then they found out that a new road might bring a steady flow of truck traffic right through Twin Ridge.The developments of the past few months have galvanized the Twin Ridge community.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | March 19, 1996
If there's anything more all-American than Mount Airy, with its Norman Rockwell Main Street that has attracted droves of newcomers in recent years, it's probably baseball.But it is a baseball field at Twin Ridge Elementary School that has divided this community of 5,000 just as surely as the Carroll-Frederick County line that runs through the heart of town.On one side are the traditionalists who cling to a deeply held suburban principle the right to play amateur baseball on cool summer nights with bugs bouncing off vapor lights.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Sun Staff Writer | April 28, 1995
A new era of night baseball was ushered into Mount Airy this week as town officials flipped the switch on a set of controversial light towers that have divided some residents and local ball players."
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