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By Michael Reeb and Michael Reeb,Staff Writer | November 24, 1992
Rick Bingham had tried his hand -- and feet -- at soccer, boxing and motocross, but it wasn't until eight years ago that he took up running.Were it not for a few injuries, he may never had done that. But based on his success in the Twin Cities Marathon on Oct. 4 in Minneapolis-St. Paul, where he improved his marathon personal record by 10 minutes, he made a wise decision."I started playing soccer in high school, and when I got out of high school, I didn't do anything for a year," says Bingham, 37, of Parkville.
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NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | April 1, 2014
Glancing out the windows of Sujata Massey's house on an early spring day, you could be on a quiet street anywhere, in Japan, or India, or Minneapolis, Minn. Massey shares a bond with all of those places, but her heart and home are in the Roland Park area. She lives near Roland Avenue, in Tuxedo Park. An Indian tablecloth graces Massey's dining room table, where the award-wining author and former reporter - best known for her series of mystery novels set in Japan featuring sleuth Rei Shimura - does most of her writing.
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SPORTS
November 16, 1991
No respectIt seems that making it to the Stanley Cup final hasn't helped the Minnesota North Stars get more recognition in newspapers around the Twin Cities.Says defenseman Rob Ramage: "After I get by three or four pages of [baseball's] Twins notes, the [football] Vikings, high school scores and university sports, I know hockey is in there somewhere. It's not like Toronto."The quoteHouston Oilers defensive end Sean Jones, on the Dallas Cowboys: "The Cowboys are like a bunch of little maggots.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2013
When Margaret Sherrod was in her 20s, she filled her weekends with 10k and other races, but in recent years she has cut back her competitive running schedule. The 58-year-old retired teacher from Millersville is still in great shape and runs regularly for fun and fitness with a group called the Pacemakers. It's the cost that has dampened her love for races. She is now selective about which ones she participates in - the more expensive events can cost $100 or more - and chooses to run only a few a year.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove | February 17, 1991
ONCE UPON A TIME, THERE was a kind Fortune 500 corporation that donated millions of dollars to do good works in its hometown. It helped unwed mothers and underprivileged children. It built housing for the poor. It funded theater proj-ects and dance troupes. It was the community's No. 1 sugar daddy.One year, though, the kind corporation ran into trouble. Sales and profits went down. And then a big, bad, faraway company threatened to take over the corporation, break it up and sell off the pieces.
FEATURES
By Lou Carlozo and Lou Carlozo,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 9, 1997
Those who live in Minneapolis-St. Paul boast a cold-weather spunk worth saluting with humility. Or a song.Case in point: On a recent January weekend, wind chills dipped to near 60 degrees below zero for three straight nights. But that hardly stopped Twin Cities denizens from donning their party hats (along with multiple layers of scarves, jackets and thermal undies) and packing the local nightclubs.Why brave such subarctic climes? Whether at Bunker's, the Cabooze, Lee's Liquor Bar or the famed First Avenue, crowds came out to hear music, though not the sort that might entice the natives elsewhere.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | April 1, 2014
Glancing out the windows of Sujata Massey's house on an early spring day, you could be on a quiet street anywhere, in Japan, or India, or Minneapolis, Minn. Massey shares a bond with all of those places, but her heart and home are in the Roland Park area. She lives near Roland Avenue, in Tuxedo Park. An Indian tablecloth graces Massey's dining room table, where the award-wining author and former reporter - best known for her series of mystery novels set in Japan featuring sleuth Rei Shimura - does most of her writing.
NEWS
February 11, 2010
Please allow this Snow-Belt-raised gal to respond to the article "Winter-tested cities amused by our plight" (Feb. 11): I have seen, and shoveled, lots and lots and lots of snow in my life. But I have never seen anything like this. With all due respect to my brethren still dwelling in northern climes, they're full of, um, stuffing. Buffalo, Syracuse, Erie, Chicago, the Twin Cities -- sure, they get a lot of snow. But comparisons between full-season totals and one-two-storm totals are the proverbial apples and oranges.
NEWS
February 11, 2010
When you are interviewing people from St. Paul who want to talk smack about how we can't handle a little snow ("Winter tested cities amused by our plight," Feb. 11), please remind them (and your readers) that the historic and record-breaking Halloween Blizzard of 1991 knocked that city flat on its butt for several days, with only a measly 28 inches on dry and relatively warm pavement. I was there for college. It was a hoot. They were very lucky it hit on a Thursday so they could be spared the humiliation of a multi-day shutdown.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina | July 18, 2012
MINNEAPOLIS -- Jim Thome's 607 th home run ball has finally landed in the right hands. The 41-year-old Orioles DH, knowing that every homer he hits in his incredible big league career could be his last, has been collecting his home run balls since he hit No. 500 back in 2007. Last month, Thome hit his 607 th career homer at Target Field - where he played for the Twins in 2010 and most of 2011  - and it landed in the shrubbery just beyond the top of the outfield wall in right-center.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina | July 18, 2012
MINNEAPOLIS -- Jim Thome's 607 th home run ball has finally landed in the right hands. The 41-year-old Orioles DH, knowing that every homer he hits in his incredible big league career could be his last, has been collecting his home run balls since he hit No. 500 back in 2007. Last month, Thome hit his 607 th career homer at Target Field - where he played for the Twins in 2010 and most of 2011  - and it landed in the shrubbery just beyond the top of the outfield wall in right-center.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2010
Underneath the mattress isn't going to cut it. Neither will tucking it behind the stack of "Twilight" books. Not even pushing it deep into the toe of a smelly gym shoe. The dog will find it. And he'll know it's not oregano. A new service in Maryland is promising parents peace of mind by allowing them to essentially rent a drug-sniffing dog, a highly trained canine that will come to their house and within seconds, detect even the tiniest whiff of narcotics. The program allows ordinary moms and dads access to a search tool typically reserved for law enforcement — and typically aimed at suspected criminals.
NEWS
February 11, 2010
Please allow this Snow-Belt-raised gal to respond to the article "Winter-tested cities amused by our plight" (Feb. 11): I have seen, and shoveled, lots and lots and lots of snow in my life. But I have never seen anything like this. With all due respect to my brethren still dwelling in northern climes, they're full of, um, stuffing. Buffalo, Syracuse, Erie, Chicago, the Twin Cities -- sure, they get a lot of snow. But comparisons between full-season totals and one-two-storm totals are the proverbial apples and oranges.
NEWS
February 11, 2010
When you are interviewing people from St. Paul who want to talk smack about how we can't handle a little snow ("Winter tested cities amused by our plight," Feb. 11), please remind them (and your readers) that the historic and record-breaking Halloween Blizzard of 1991 knocked that city flat on its butt for several days, with only a measly 28 inches on dry and relatively warm pavement. I was there for college. It was a hoot. They were very lucky it hit on a Thursday so they could be spared the humiliation of a multi-day shutdown.
SPORTS
By DAN CONNOLLY and DAN CONNOLLY,SUN REPORTER | June 11, 2006
Minneapolis -- It has been more than two years since Orioles reliever LaTroy Hawkins left Minnesota as a free agent, but the personalized license plates, the ones with "LHFC," are still on some cars in the Twin Cities. The LaTroy Hawkins Fan Club. Hawkins, who has one of the personalized plates with his old No. 32 on it, said there are about 800 members in the group. He said it started one day about six years ago when he was the only Twin to sign autographs after a game. It grew from there, and Friday, when Hawkins pitched again in the place where he spent the first nine seasons of his career, about 60 LHFC members were in attendance.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 16, 1997
GRAND FORKS, N.D. -- The Christmas menu may not include turkey this year, because Beth Bouley still doesn't have a kitchen. And she may serve off paper plates, "but who cares?"Last year, presents in the Bouleys' century-old house near the Red River were "stacked to the ceiling." This year, instead of wrapped packages, she'll be giving some people cards that say, "A check has been sent in your name to the Salvation Army."Eight months ago, the Red River and the Red Lake River roared over dikes and consumed Grand Forks and East Grand Forks.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 30, 1996
MINNEAPOLIS -- This was a city that seemed to have all the answers.Fortune 500 companies thrive in an atmosphere of Scandinavian-style social liberalism. Stillwater lakes give woodsy neighborhoods a fairy-tale look. Even the brutal Upper Midwest winters are made manageable, with elaborate glass skyways to protect downtown pedestrians.It is a way of life, the Minneapolis Star Tribune once noted, that boosters regard as "superior to that in most places on earth."But lately, this idyllic image has been shattered by violence, with gang turf wars and drive-by shootings on streets where children play games of kick-the-can.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2013
When Margaret Sherrod was in her 20s, she filled her weekends with 10k and other races, but in recent years she has cut back her competitive running schedule. The 58-year-old retired teacher from Millersville is still in great shape and runs regularly for fun and fitness with a group called the Pacemakers. It's the cost that has dampened her love for races. She is now selective about which ones she participates in - the more expensive events can cost $100 or more - and chooses to run only a few a year.
FEATURES
By Lou Carlozo and Lou Carlozo,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 9, 1997
Those who live in Minneapolis-St. Paul boast a cold-weather spunk worth saluting with humility. Or a song.Case in point: On a recent January weekend, wind chills dipped to near 60 degrees below zero for three straight nights. But that hardly stopped Twin Cities denizens from donning their party hats (along with multiple layers of scarves, jackets and thermal undies) and packing the local nightclubs.Why brave such subarctic climes? Whether at Bunker's, the Cabooze, Lee's Liquor Bar or the famed First Avenue, crowds came out to hear music, though not the sort that might entice the natives elsewhere.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 30, 1996
MINNEAPOLIS -- This was a city that seemed to have all the answers.Fortune 500 companies thrive in an atmosphere of Scandinavian-style social liberalism. Stillwater lakes give woodsy neighborhoods a fairy-tale look. Even the brutal Upper Midwest winters are made manageable, with elaborate glass skyways to protect downtown pedestrians.It is a way of life, the Minneapolis Star Tribune once noted, that boosters regard as "superior to that in most places on earth."But lately, this idyllic image has been shattered by violence, with gang turf wars and drive-by shootings on streets where children play games of kick-the-can.
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