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Twentysomething

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By Jeff Leeds and Jeff Leeds,Contributing Writer | July 15, 1993
WASHINGTON -- A somewhat brash but articulate group of twentysomething urban professionals -- contrasting with their generation's reputation for political apathy and the values of TV character Bart Simpson -- declared their fear and anger over the swelling national debt yesterday and announced plans to form an interest group to represent them.Calling themselves a "post-partisan" organization, the members of the newly created Third Millennium issued a plea for fellow young adults to join and distributed copies of their manifesto, which charges that "those in power have practiced fiscal child abuse, mortgaging our future, and the futures of those to come."
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BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2012
Give anyone age 40 and older a time machine and they would likely go back to their early 20s — to open an IRA. That's because by 40, many of us have learned the miracle of compound earnings over time. We kick ourselves for not socking away even tiny sums in a tax-sheltered individual retirement account when we were younger. Consider the math: A 22-year-old who invests $100 a month in an IRA for 10 years and then stops will end up with more money at age 65 than a 32-year-old who saves $100 a month in an IRA for 33 years.
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FEATURES
By David Daley and David Daley,States News Service | September 5, 1995
Washington -- Just like "Wayne's World," the twentysomethings of "Youngbloods" dissect the issues from a basement studio made to look like a college dormitory.Much like "Crossfire," the insults fly from left to right as the would-be pundits debate the future of the Environmental Protection Agency and the proper role of environmental regulations.But Wayne and Garth never felt comfortable talking about anything besides Aerosmith, Madonna or the latest supermodel. David Brinkley would never silence George Will with the put-down, "That's an SAT word."
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2011
When it comes to the royal wedding, no detail is off limits — the bride's weight, who's making her dress and who didn't make the guest list. Even the couple's finances are open to scrutiny. Will Prince William break with tradition and ask bride-to-be Kate Middleton to sign a prenup? While all eyes now are on the "wedding of the century," there are plenty of commoners in their 20s getting hitched every day. Their finances aren't fodder for the tabloids, although money will play a major role in their lives together.
FEATURES
By A. M. Chaplin | March 17, 1991
They certainly have acquired a fine collection of adjectives for themselves.They've been called spoiled, brash, apathetic, ignorant -- and they've also been called fortunate, polite, careful and sophisticated. It seems they confuse their observers -- and when you talk to them, it seems they confuse themselves as well.They are the baby busters, that small generation now more or less in its 20s that follows the vast demographic bulge of the baby boomers. In the looming shadow of their noisy predecessors, these twentysomethings exist uncertainly, almost tentatively.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | September 18, 1992
How many times have you read or heard the phrase "twentysomething ensemble drama" and the name Aaron Spelling since the new season started?Sorry about this, but "The Round Table" is a twentysomething you-know-what from you-know-who. This one is set in Georgetown, and it features young professionals, most of whom are starting careers in fields related to law enforcement.There's Devereaux Jones (Pepper Sweeney), a naive Secret Service agent; Jennifer Clemente (Roxann Biggs), a rookie prosecutor in the U.S. Attorney's office; Mitchell Clark (Thomas Breznahan)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | September 23, 1992
There's a segment in tonight's "Rock the Vote" special on Fox that's a virtual manifesto for twentysomething.Shot in black and white, the screen is filled with alternating tight face shots of Jason Priestley from "Beverly Hills, 90210," and Lisa Bonet, formerly of "Cosby" and "A Different World."Bonet: "Some people say our generation doesn't count."Priestley: "Yeah, right."L Bonet: "Which generation insisted on dolphin-friendly tuna?"Priestley: "And inspired a fourth TV network? We've got advertisers begging for our attention."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | May 8, 1992
Fox Broadcasting is going to make the summer TV season a hotly contested one.The fourth network yesterday announced that it will expand to six nights of first-run, prime-time programming July 1 with the debut of "Melrose Place," a twentysomething ensemble drama from the producers of "Beverly Hills, 90210.""It is the kind of show viewers can't find on any other network," Fox Entertainment President Peter Chernin said yesterday. "It's a look at today's twentysomething generation . . . coming of age and on their own for the first time."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | May 8, 1992
Fox Broadcasting is going to make the summer TV season a hotly contested one.The fourth network yesterday announced that it will expand to six nights of first-run, prime-time programming July 1 with the debut of "Melrose Place," a twentysomething ensemble drama from the producers of "Beverly Hills, 90210.""It is the kind of show viewers can't find on any other network," Fox Entertainment President Peter Chernin said yesterday. "It's a look at today's twentysomething generation . . . coming of age and on their own for the first time."
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON and RASHOD D. OLLISON,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | March 23, 2006
The backstage noise was distracting until somebody closed the door to Jamie Cullum's dressing room. The jazzy pop singer-songwriter is calling from a venue in Italy, where he's set to perform in a little under an hour. Nervous? "No, I'm fine," he says in his dusky British accent. At 26, the handsome pint-sized crooner comes off as a confident pro, a calm, cool, collected vet who has played the game for years. Yet from time to time, as he talks about his latest album, Catching Tales, Cullum bubbles with the excitement of a wet-behind-the-ears musician.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,hanah.cho@baltsun.com | March 3, 2009
At 29, Cynthia Schatoff has been laid off twice. After three years as a graphic artist at a local firm, she was let go in April. It wasn't easy finding a job as the economy worsened, but she did. In September, she lost that job. After six months at an Internet startup, Loretta Goodridge, 27, lost her $65,000-a-year contract in January as seed money dried up. A few years ago, employers wooed young workers with bonuses, perks and trips to ski resorts....
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | November 4, 2007
After social scientist William Galston presented his report on what our twentysomething children are up to these days, he was swamped with e-mails, phone calls and dinner-party button-holing by panicked parents. "It appears we have an entire generation of parents who are asking themselves what they are supposed to be doing now," said Galston, a scholar at the Brookings Institution and himself the father of a twentysomething son. Last month, Galston described this new developmental stage between adolescence and adulthood in a presentation sponsored by the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy - which has expanded its provinces to include a new decade of driftiness and uncertainty that appears to follow the teen years.
BUSINESS
By Carolyn Bigda and Carolyn Bigda,Tribune Media Services | July 22, 2007
Love those Apple commercials? Can't resist the organic aura of Whole Foods Market grocery stores? There may be a reason why. Today's twentysomethings are fast becoming the focus of advertisers. Baby boomers are retiring. And in their stead, Generation Y, those born roughly between 1980 and 2000, promise to have just as much purchasing power. Generation Y is the largest group since the baby boomers, who were born between 1946 and 1965. Within less than a decade, Gen Yers are expected by some to be the most influential consumers in the U.S. economy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON and RASHOD D. OLLISON,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | March 23, 2006
The backstage noise was distracting until somebody closed the door to Jamie Cullum's dressing room. The jazzy pop singer-songwriter is calling from a venue in Italy, where he's set to perform in a little under an hour. Nervous? "No, I'm fine," he says in his dusky British accent. At 26, the handsome pint-sized crooner comes off as a confident pro, a calm, cool, collected vet who has played the game for years. Yet from time to time, as he talks about his latest album, Catching Tales, Cullum bubbles with the excitement of a wet-behind-the-ears musician.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 15, 2005
Batman begins? Hardly. Unlike Batman Begins, the $135 million movie opening in 3,700 of the nation's movie theaters today, the real beginning of Batman has nothing to do with big-budget Hollywood blockbusters set in far-off monasteries. It has to do with a couple of twentysomethings in the waning days of the Great Depression, struggling to make a go of it in the comics pages at a time when, if you weren't from the planet Krypton, you were nothin'. In 1938, Bob Kane was 23, a former New York street tough - his autobiography Batman & Me talks about having his hand broken by rival gang members, and his relief at having it heal sufficiently to let him continue drawing - who honed his craft at Cooper Union and the Art Students League.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | March 30, 2005
Open the fridge of a typical Gen Y-er and it's, like, weird in there. There are a lot of condiments, a bag of prewashed salad, some leftover Thai food or pizza, a container of yogurt and a couple of beers and soda. Not the makings of a great meal. In reality such a fridge doesn't exist because there isn't a typical member of the Y generation, the oldest of which are now moving through their 20s. This is America's most racially and ethnically diverse generation (one in four isn't Caucasian)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | September 13, 1992
Maybe he had heard the terms twentysomething, youthquake or baby busters once too often during the press conference. Whatever the reason, CBS Entertainment president Jeff Sagansky suddenly dropped the ambiguous language of network-speak and cut through the thickening fog of information overload and new-show hype with one answer that should help viewers make some sense of the 1992-'93 network TV season, which officially begins tonight."
FEATURES
By Paul Lomartire and Paul Lomartire,Cox News Service | August 17, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- Disposable diapers. Disposable cameras. Disposable lighters. Disposable razors.Disposable TV actors?Yes. Welcome to the 1992-'93 network TV season."
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | December 16, 2004
That strange, woodsy smell of a new place hits you first when entering Rams Head Live, the downtown venue near the Inner Harbor that opened its doors to the public last night. The joint - sleek and modern-looking with muted clay-red walls and exposed steel beams above - wasn't really packed, partly because the inaugurating act, the Celtic rock unit Gaelic Storm, isn't a band that attracts long, snaking lines to the box office. But it seemed the crowd - mostly folks in their mid- to late 20s - was more curious about the look of Rams Head Live than the energetic rock group that graced the 42-by-20-foot modular stage.
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