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By MICHAEL SRAGOW | December 7, 2007
Newspaper columns, letters to the editor and water-cooler chatter about the film and television writers' strike have veered from solidarity to sneers at supposedly spoiled and talentless show-biz scribes demanding a bigger percentage of an ever-expanding digital pie. It's hard to muster common-man sympathy for workers in a glamour industry based in sunny (albeit fiery and quaky) California. Skeptics should rent or buy a DVD called The TV Set. Despite rave reviews in The New York Times, Los Angeles Times and The New Yorker last spring, it never opened in Baltimore.
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ENTERTAINMENT
David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2014
Whether it's hosting "Inside the NBA" or calling a Major League Baseball playoff series, Ernie Johnson makes sports broadcasting seem easy. There has not been much joy for Orioles fans with the Birds losing the first two games of the American League Championship Series to the Kansas City Royals, and TBS delivering lackluster telecasts. The delay of the first pitch on opening night in Baltimore because super-bright TV lights on the set of the TBS pre-game show in center field were left on was an unforgivable gaffe.
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FEATURES
By Chicago Tribune | October 13, 1992
CHICAGO -- The "act of God," as Francis Harty calls it, struck when he and his wife, Lorree, were snuggled in their living room watching a small black-and-white television during a raging spring storm."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
Hamilton Tavern, on the corner of Harford Road and Wisteria Avenue, is a rare thing - a true neighborhood tavern with citywide appeal. The official city-designated neighborhood for this address is Glenham-Belhar, but as Tom Creegan, the Brewer's Art partner who runs Hamilton Tavern, noted, everybody up there calls this neighborhood just plain Hamilton. I know folks from all over Baltimore who have adopted Hamilton Tavern as their own, and the nice folks who run the place and the Hamilton residents that frequent it have been more than decent about sharing it with the city at large.
NEWS
By Kelly Gilbert and Kelly Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | February 7, 1991
Several hundred people in the federal courthouse downtown were held hostage for about an hour -- by a harmless television set.About 2:45 p.m. yesterday, U.S. marshals and court-security officers cleared the building's lobby, first-floor offices and front hallways, near walls of windows, after a man left the TV on the front steps and told a clerk on the fourth floor that he wanted Judge Norman P. Ramsey to get the set fixed for him.Lisa White, the clerk, identified...
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | April 7, 1991
It is always the picture tube. That is the First Great Truth of Life. (The Second Great Truth is: It is always the carburetor. But that's another story.)Call any TV repair shop if you don't believe me."The wood veneer is coming off the top of my set," you say."It's the picture tube," the guy will say."Really? How can that be?""Well, the tube swells up with argon gas, see, and it, uh, pushes out the sides of the set and, uh, pops off the veneer," he says."Oh. So I guess I need a new picture tube, right?"
FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Contributing Writer Los Angeles Times Syndicate | December 26, 1993
Q: We're planning to convert a small bedroom into a home office. The space will require shelving, a filing cabinet, desk and TV set as well as a pullout bed for the occasional overnight guest. Some kind of storage compartment will be needed too, since we're going to remove the closet as part of the renovation. The room will then be 14 feet long but only 10 feet wide. Any suggestions for how to make this a cheerful as well as a functional space?A: That's a tall order, I must say. But your goals can be achieved if you apply some of the techniques used in the similar space shown in the photograph.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | October 9, 2000
I have been trying out PC-based video cameras for years, but every one I've used has one major drawback: It's tethered to a computer. That means you can watch yourself looking at your computer, drag your kids in front of the screen to snap a few stills for e-mailing to grandma, or try your hand at videoconferencing, provided you can find someone else with compatible hardware and software who doesn't mind staring at a grainy, jerky image with sound that's...
NEWS
By Howard Bluth | December 13, 1990
At the foot of every bed, confronting the moribund occupant, was a television box. Television was left on, a running tap, from morning till night.Aldous Huxley, "Brave New World" CRITICS miss the point when they complain that Barry Levinson's "Avalon" lacks a point. The point, rather obvious once you look beneath this film's endearing surface, is television -- its evolution as a mass medium, and its debilitating influence on our lives.Its initial appearance is harmless enough. Three generations of the Krichinsky clan -- Levinson's semi-autobiographical film family -- are gathered around a funny-looking box in anticipation of something happening.
FEATURES
By Jane Hall and Jane Hall,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | February 7, 1996
The passage of a federal telecommunications bill mandating a v-chip in every new TV set presents the broadcast networks with a serious challenge to their public image.Television executives believe the measure violates their companies' free-speech rights and are considering challenging it in court. But they fear they could win the legal battle and lose the public-opinion war if they are seen as trying to stymie parents who want to protect their children from programs laden with sex and violence.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | December 23, 2007
News item: Sens. Patrick Leahy and Arlen Specter are threatening to lift the NFL's antitrust exemption if the NFL Network and the major cable providers do not settle their differences so everyone can watch the historic season finale between the New England Patriots and New York Giants. My take: Once again, it's good to see the federal government has its priorities in order. Apparently, poverty, the mortgage crisis and a variety of other serious national problems were solved while we weren't paying attention.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW | December 7, 2007
Newspaper columns, letters to the editor and water-cooler chatter about the film and television writers' strike have veered from solidarity to sneers at supposedly spoiled and talentless show-biz scribes demanding a bigger percentage of an ever-expanding digital pie. It's hard to muster common-man sympathy for workers in a glamour industry based in sunny (albeit fiery and quaky) California. Skeptics should rent or buy a DVD called The TV Set. Despite rave reviews in The New York Times, Los Angeles Times and The New Yorker last spring, it never opened in Baltimore.
BUSINESS
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | October 27, 2005
If you have a TV set that receives signals over the air, pay attention to Congress. It's about to pick your pocket by turning every one of those sets into a paperweight - unless you pay $50 ransom for each set. The vehicle for this exercise in highway robbery? Legislation setting a firm date for the switchover from analog to digital TV broadcasting, abandoning the technology broadcasters have used since the dawn of the medium. Sometime in 2009, you'll need a new digital television to watch your favorite shows over-the-air, or you'll have to buy a converter for your existing set. The House Energy and Commerce subcommittee this week picked midnight on Dec. 31, 2008, for the change.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Craig Crossman and Craig Crossman,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 21, 2004
MSN TV 2 offers an improvement in inexpensive set-top access to WebOver the years, I've seen them come and go. I'm talking about those set-top boxes for your television that give you access to the Internet. While they met with varying degrees of success, most of them weren't a hit with consumers. The latest offering is made by Microsoft. The MSN TV 2 Internet and Media Player is a second-generation box that has learned from so many of the mistakes inherent in its predecessors. And while this still may not be TV Internet nirvana, I believe they are on the right path with this unit.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Ed Waldman and Jon Morgan and Ed Waldman,SUN STAFF | October 2, 2004
The Orioles will be guaranteed at least $130 million a year in revenue and be assured of a price of at least $360 million should the franchise be sold, under an agreement nearing completion between the team and Major League Baseball. Orioles owner Peter Angelos demanded a deal to protect the franchise from any adverse financial consequences after Major League Baseball announced this week that it would move the Montreal Expos to Washington for the 2005 season. The agreement calls for baseball to pay the Orioles in the event their gross revenue falls below a benchmark of about $130 million, millions less than they are expected to earn this year without competition in Washington, but still a valuable safety net. The benchmark is being set by a formula based on attendance.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | May 4, 2002
GUILT IS A powerful motivator, especially this time of year. Part of me feels compelled to start building and planting. But another part wants to plant itself on a couch as I watch televised sports. Today, for instance, my inner couch potato reminds me that there are baseball and lacrosse games on the tube this afternoon and an NBA playoff game on this evening. At the stroke of 5 p.m., I will pick up my julep cup and commune with the multitudes watching the Kentucky Derby. At the same time, however, the great glob of guilt that functions as my conscience tells me that I shouldn't be a slug, that I should get off my haunches and fix something.
NEWS
March 13, 1995
FROM the critic Michael Medved, writing in the Heritage Foundation's Policy Review (Winter, 1995):Even if through some miracle TV could be instantly cleansed of all the violence and the smut, would you, then, feel very comfortable about the idea of your children spending 28 hours a week watching TV? Of course not.The problem in the country isn't too much violence on TV, and it isn't too much promiscuous sexuality in popular culture. It's too much television, period. . . .Years ago, when the surgeon general announced to the public that smoking might not be the best thing for all Americans, you know the first thing that people did?
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | September 1, 1993
I'm stumped. I'm confused. I thought I understood the world, and now I'm pretty sure I don't.Here's the deal.You find yourself up at 11:35 last Monday night. The TV set is on. Heck, the TV set's always on. You remember the old days. You'd watch Johnny and then whatever came on after Johnny and then there'd be the devotional and then the jet flyovers with a rousing "Star-Spangled Banner" recording in the background and then -- bam -- a test pattern with those cross hairs in the middle, to make it easier for Elvis I figured.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Heather Newman and Heather Newman,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 28, 2002
George Carlin made a living for years having fun with the seven dirty words you couldn't say on television. Those taboos are long gone to a point, at least in the evening hours. Now swear words regularly pop up in both network and cable programming, posing a dilemma for some parents. You don't want to watch your children every second they're in front of the television, but you don't want your youngster cheerfully parroting bad words at the dinner table, either. Diane LaPierre, a Canadian mother of four and former forklift operator in Calgary, Alberta, stumbled across the problem when she suggested that she and her son try reading the closed captioning on his favorite cartoons as a way to practice reading.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | February 6, 2002
The Sun is poised to enter a sweeping alliance with Baltimore television station WMAR that would begin to integrate the newspaper's reporting into the station's newscasts and also set the stage for joint advertising and promotional efforts. In a deal expected to be announced soon, Sun reporters would appear regularly on Channel 2's news shows, with The Sun's logo readily visible. In addition, the two media outlets are planning to swap advertising, with time on the air traded for ad space inside the newspaper.
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