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By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2013
If Ray Lewis is looking for a high-paying, high-visibility job after he leaves the Baltimore Ravens, he's not going to have much trouble getting a shot at one in sports television. That's the assessment of media analysts and TV executives responsible for producing the studio shows and game telecasts of the NFL. But success in the TV studio or booth is far from guaranteed, even for someone the stature of Lewis, analysts caution, pointing to the career of former Dallas Cowboys running back Emmitt Smith, among others.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2013
“I'm 27. I'm retired. But I still want to compete.” That's Olympic champion Michael Phelps talking in “The Haney Project,” a Golf Channel series that stars Tiger Woods' one-time coach taking on a new celebrity student each season. Phelps' words pretty much summarize the premise of this year's edition, which starts Monday night. In the past, Hank Haney's celebrity pupils have included Ray Romano, Rush Limbaugh, Charles Barkley and Maroon 5 singer Adam Levine. This season, the student is the swimmer from Baltimore who won 18 gold medals in Olympic competition.
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FEATURES
By Dan Rodricks | August 9, 1992
This is it! This is the big time, baby! Drop the baggy pants. Peg the old blue blazer. Kill the eyeglasses. Shape up! Get a hairstyle. Get a facial. You want to be a player, don't you? Here's your chance. Slip into a Hugo Boss jacket, a Bill Robinson shirt, a Perry Ellis tie! Smile! And remember -- eye contact is everything.I was sitting in front of a mirror, getting a pep talk from this red-haired makeup artist, when all of a sudden a woman with bouncing gold earrings, a midwinter tan and a hip-as-tomorrow perm danced through the dressing room door, stroked my pancaked chin with her hot-pink fingernails and puckered her lips, as if to say, "Poopsie Woopsie."
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2013
If Ray Lewis is looking for a high-paying, high-visibility job after he leaves the Baltimore Ravens, he's not going to have much trouble getting a shot at one in sports television. That's the assessment of media analysts and TV executives responsible for producing the studio shows and game telecasts of the NFL. But success in the TV studio or booth is far from guaranteed, even for someone the stature of Lewis, analysts caution, pointing to the career of former Dallas Cowboys running back Emmitt Smith, among others.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 28, 1996
Let me be blunt:Call your local cable company right now and tell them to get on the stick and add the new TV Land channel to their lineup.Why? Because it's the only way you'll be able to reacquaint yourself with everyone from "Mannix" to "That Girl" to "Hogan's Heroes" to the gang on "Hill Street Blues."Tomorrow night, Nickelodeon is pre-empting its regular Nick-at-Nite programming to air the TV Land kickoff from 8 p.m. until 5: 30 a.m. the next day. Tune in and find out what you'll be missing unless the cable companies here wake up and smell the coffee (none of them has yet added the channel to their lineups)
FEATURES
By Hal Boedeker and Hal Boedeker,ORLANDO SENTINEL | August 16, 2004
If Paris Hilton can earn a series for her misadventures, why can't television's beloved old stars share their colorful lives in a show? After all, they've provided years of entertainment, a feat beyond Hilton's grasp. We won't always have this Paris. The cable channel TV Land is giving veteran actors their close-ups in the reality series Living in TV Land. The Wednesday premiere focuses on Dick Van Patten, who's zanier than the father he played on Eight Is Enough from 1977 to 1981. Van Patten is such a dynamic, competitive figure at 75 that he launches Living in TV Land with gusto.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 1, 2002
The folks at TV Land want it known that there's more to life on their cable channel than reruns of Petticoat Junction. And the three-part history series, TV Land: African Americans in Television, is an important step in that direction. The nonfiction series that starts tonight looks at African-Americans in network dramas, comedies and variety specials. Tonight's focus is on blacks in variety shows, a genre that flourished in the 1950s and '60s. Not surprisingly for a cable channel that lives or dies off its video library, the clips from early TV are evocative.
ENTERTAINMENT
By NEWSDAY | October 24, 2004
How obsessed with lists is today's showbiz-centric tube? Music channel VH1 seems to do nothing other than best/worst countdowns. E! fills time with hot celebrity moments. And now TV Land gets into the game with its Wednesday-at-10 originals slot. Recent specials aired under the "TV Land's Top 10" banner have charted classic Andy Griffith Show moments and even best-loved TV dads. (Andy Taylor came in first. Ozzy Osbourne and Ozzie Nelson tied for 10th.) TV Cars rolled in last week with comments from tube stars, auto designers and NASCAR drivers.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2005
Turning off the television gives us a chance to think, read, create, and do. To connect with our families and engage in our communities. - TV-Turnoff Network It's that prime time of year when people are asked to give up for one week their inalienable rights to watch American Idol, Google their old girlfriends or spend four hours multiplaying in the World of Warcraft. Armed with statistics and even more studies ("Among 4-year-olds, each hour of daily television time corresponds to a 9 percent increase in their risk of bullying others")
ENTERTAINMENT
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan | February 9, 2003
So you weren't invited to any Fashion Week shows in New York and the closest you've gotten to fashion editrix Anna Wintour is your monthly subscription to Vogue. Well, fear not, there are other ways to conjure the spirit of Fashion Week -- even if you are south of the cat(ty)walks. Between tonight and Thursday, Nick at Nite is showing fashion-related episodes from classic TV sitcoms like The Cosby Show, Cheers, Three's Company, All in the Family and Charles in Charge. There is the episode where Cosby's Clair hires a personal trainer (Debbie Allen)
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2012
President Barack Obama's appearance Wednesday night on Jay Leno's "Tonight Show" was a long, free, smiley-face ride through a land of pattycake questions teed up one after another to make the guest look good and mock his Republican opponent. Will someone tell me why more people aren't concerned about entertainment shows with audiences measured in the millions being used this way for what is essentially propaganda? I say "long" because Obama didn't just "drop by" to chat with Jay, as they say in the phony-speak of TV Land, he was pretty much the whole show.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | November 12, 2009
If I hear the hyphenated adjective "must-win" attached to another Ravens game this year, I'm going to sever my other Achilles tendon and spend the rest of the NFL season watching another 100 "Gunsmoke" reruns on TV Land. When the Ravens play the Cleveland Browns on national television Monday night, it's going to be about a lot more than just winning. It's going to be about self-esteem. It has to be the night they get their groove back. Forget about the proverbial must-win situation - especially since they've already lost the last couple of times that term has been applied.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | November 22, 2008
Of all the Superman films to date, 1980's Superman II (10 p.m. on TV Land, repeats at 12:30 a.m.) stands out as the best. It's got a strong, charismatic performance from Christopher Reeve (who never got his due as an actor in this role). It's got wonderful villains in both Gene Hackman's Lex Luthor (who was so good that Kevin Spacey was left with nothing to do but imitate him in 2006's Superman Returns) and Terence Stamp's General Zod. It's got a touching storyline (Superman reveals his secret identity to Lois)
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2005
Turning off the television gives us a chance to think, read, create, and do. To connect with our families and engage in our communities. - TV-Turnoff Network It's that prime time of year when people are asked to give up for one week their inalienable rights to watch American Idol, Google their old girlfriends or spend four hours multiplaying in the World of Warcraft. Armed with statistics and even more studies ("Among 4-year-olds, each hour of daily television time corresponds to a 9 percent increase in their risk of bullying others")
ENTERTAINMENT
By NEWSDAY | October 24, 2004
How obsessed with lists is today's showbiz-centric tube? Music channel VH1 seems to do nothing other than best/worst countdowns. E! fills time with hot celebrity moments. And now TV Land gets into the game with its Wednesday-at-10 originals slot. Recent specials aired under the "TV Land's Top 10" banner have charted classic Andy Griffith Show moments and even best-loved TV dads. (Andy Taylor came in first. Ozzy Osbourne and Ozzie Nelson tied for 10th.) TV Cars rolled in last week with comments from tube stars, auto designers and NASCAR drivers.
FEATURES
By Hal Boedeker and Hal Boedeker,ORLANDO SENTINEL | August 16, 2004
If Paris Hilton can earn a series for her misadventures, why can't television's beloved old stars share their colorful lives in a show? After all, they've provided years of entertainment, a feat beyond Hilton's grasp. We won't always have this Paris. The cable channel TV Land is giving veteran actors their close-ups in the reality series Living in TV Land. The Wednesday premiere focuses on Dick Van Patten, who's zanier than the father he played on Eight Is Enough from 1977 to 1981. Van Patten is such a dynamic, competitive figure at 75 that he launches Living in TV Land with gusto.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | October 15, 1997
In the Old West, according to Showtime, it was bad luck to pick up a dead man's gun. So why keep doing it?That's one question that goes unanswered in "Dead Man's Gun" (10 p.m.-11 p.m.), an anthology series struggling to bring the West back to TV land -- complete with saucy language and bare-chested ladies (this is cable, after all).Michael Moriarty and Kate Jackson star tonight, as a ruthless bounty hunter and the woman who wants to see him pay for accidentally killing her son. Moriarty, that most wooden of actors, is well-cast as a cold-hearted killer who doesn't much care for jTC anyone or anything.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | May 31, 2000
Ready to use that useless trove of TV trivia you've amassed over the years for some purpose other than impressing your friends at Trivial Pursuit? Show up at the Columbia Mall Saturday and, if you're good enough, you may end up as host of your own programming block on cable's TV Land. The cable channel that's a repository for all things nostalgic when it comes to television is holding its second "Ultimate Fan Search," to find the man or woman in the United States who has wasted the most time in front of the tube.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan | February 9, 2003
So you weren't invited to any Fashion Week shows in New York and the closest you've gotten to fashion editrix Anna Wintour is your monthly subscription to Vogue. Well, fear not, there are other ways to conjure the spirit of Fashion Week -- even if you are south of the cat(ty)walks. Between tonight and Thursday, Nick at Nite is showing fashion-related episodes from classic TV sitcoms like The Cosby Show, Cheers, Three's Company, All in the Family and Charles in Charge. There is the episode where Cosby's Clair hires a personal trainer (Debbie Allen)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 1, 2002
The folks at TV Land want it known that there's more to life on their cable channel than reruns of Petticoat Junction. And the three-part history series, TV Land: African Americans in Television, is an important step in that direction. The nonfiction series that starts tonight looks at African-Americans in network dramas, comedies and variety specials. Tonight's focus is on blacks in variety shows, a genre that flourished in the 1950s and '60s. Not surprisingly for a cable channel that lives or dies off its video library, the clips from early TV are evocative.
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