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By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2012
Sunday at 8 p.m. on "Hillbilly Handfishin," Bluegrass Tavern operating partner Jorbie Clark and his Aussie pal Aaron Stubbs go noodling with hosts Skipper Bivins and Trent Jackson and try to catch massive catfish with their hands and feet. That's this Sunday at 8 p.m. You can watch the "Hillbilly Handfishin'" episode with Clark at Bluegrass , where, from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m., the South Baltimore restaurant will be featuring $2 domestics, $3 imports and Lynchburg lemonade, $4 drafts and selected wines - and complimentary catfish bites.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2012
Jason Hisley, the lead pasry chef and designer at Flavor Cupcakery in Bel Air, will appear as a contestant on the April 12 episode of the Food Network's "Sweet Genius. "  In "Puzzled Genius," Hisley and his opponents are asked to use pink lemonade a flamingo-desired dessert in one challenge, tackle a "favorite childhood puzzle" for inspiration in another and, finally, working with "Sweet Genius" host Ron Ben-Israel, make cakes with jackfruit and galangal. Hisley is a Food Network veteran.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2012
Jason Hisley, the lead pasry chef and designer at Flavor Cupcakery in Bel Air, will appear as a contestant on the April 12 episode of the Food Network's "Sweet Genius. "  In "Puzzled Genius," Hisley and his opponents are asked to use pink lemonade a flamingo-desired dessert in one challenge, tackle a "favorite childhood puzzle" for inspiration in another and, finally, working with "Sweet Genius" host Ron Ben-Israel, make cakes with jackfruit and galangal. Hisley is a Food Network veteran.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2012
Sunday at 8 p.m. on "Hillbilly Handfishin," Bluegrass Tavern operating partner Jorbie Clark and his Aussie pal Aaron Stubbs go noodling with hosts Skipper Bivins and Trent Jackson and try to catch massive catfish with their hands and feet. That's this Sunday at 8 p.m. You can watch the "Hillbilly Handfishin'" episode with Clark at Bluegrass , where, from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m., the South Baltimore restaurant will be featuring $2 domestics, $3 imports and Lynchburg lemonade, $4 drafts and selected wines - and complimentary catfish bites.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | September 19, 2004
WHEN CHRIS HENRY caught that touchdown pass in overtime to give seventh-ranked West Virginia a 19-16 overtime victory over the Terps, I didn't know whether to laugh or cry. I'm guessing that Maryland coach Ralph Friedgen was not similarly conflicted, but if the Terrapins had come out of yesterday's game undefeated, it would have been the greatest injustice since I got cut from the baseball team at Santa Ana High School for the third year in a row in...
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | February 5, 2003
A visionary knows how it is to be misunderstood - just ask the guys who created the original TV dinner. They put the peas on the left, mashed potatoes on the right, meat front and center where it belongs. It could hardly have been simpler, yet it appears the TV dinner was misconstrued. "The idea wasn't that you sit and watch TV and eat this thing," says Gerry Thomas, who says he hatched the TV dinner while working in sales for C.A. Swanson & Sons in Omaha, Neb., a food wholesaler that put the product into national distribution in 1953.
NEWS
July 21, 2005
Gerry Thomas, 83, who changed the way Americans eat - for better or worse - with his invention of the TV Dinner during the baby boom years, died of cancer Monday in Phoenix, Ariz. Mr. Thomas was a salesman for Omaha, Neb.-based C.A. Swanson and Sons in 1954 when he got the idea of packaging frozen meals in a disposable aluminum-foil tray, divided into compartments to keep the foods from mixing. He also gave the product its singular name. The first Swanson TV Dinner - turkey with cornbread dressing, gravy, sweet potatoes and buttered peas - cooked in 25 minutes at 425 degrees.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal and Ken Rosenthal,Evening Sun Staff | October 3, 1990
At 10:01 p.m. Toronto's 2-1 victory over the Orioles wa complete. The Blue Jays retreated to their clubhouse, turned on the TV and held their breath. It was nearly 90 minutes before they were free to exhale, nearly 90 minutes of excruciating, exquisite baseball drama.The entire season flashed before their eyes, but the Blue Jaylived to see another day. Boston's 3-2 loss to Chicago in 11 innings left them one game back with one to play. There will be a one-game playoff tomorrow in Toronto if they somehow tie the Red Sox tonight.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,Staff Writer | January 2, 1993
MINNEAPOLIS -- The home team has changed quarterbacks three times in the past five weeks, has scored more than 17 points only twice in the past seven games, and doesn't have a wide receiver who has caught a pass in a month.The visiting team has lost its last two games and four of the last seven, has 11 players on the injury list and has the lowest rated quarterback in the NFC.Welcome to today's playoff game between the Washington Redskins and the Minnesota Vikings -- a testament to the NFL's never-ending quest for more television money.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | July 28, 2001
As early morning sun bathes the sidewalks in Charles Village, it seems a perfect day to chill out, to contemplate life or, perhaps, to protest the sale of veal. Kerron Ramnath is already sitting in his green plastic chair outside Eddie's Market on St. Paul Street. For several days he has been collecting signatures he hopes will lead the store to stop offering veal. Which, in turn, will end the cruel treatment of veal calves. The poster on his backpack reads "Say No To Veal." Photos of caged, miserable creatures stare reproachfully at cheerful passers-by.
NEWS
July 21, 2005
Gerry Thomas, 83, who changed the way Americans eat - for better or worse - with his invention of the TV Dinner during the baby boom years, died of cancer Monday in Phoenix, Ariz. Mr. Thomas was a salesman for Omaha, Neb.-based C.A. Swanson and Sons in 1954 when he got the idea of packaging frozen meals in a disposable aluminum-foil tray, divided into compartments to keep the foods from mixing. He also gave the product its singular name. The first Swanson TV Dinner - turkey with cornbread dressing, gravy, sweet potatoes and buttered peas - cooked in 25 minutes at 425 degrees.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | September 19, 2004
WHEN CHRIS HENRY caught that touchdown pass in overtime to give seventh-ranked West Virginia a 19-16 overtime victory over the Terps, I didn't know whether to laugh or cry. I'm guessing that Maryland coach Ralph Friedgen was not similarly conflicted, but if the Terrapins had come out of yesterday's game undefeated, it would have been the greatest injustice since I got cut from the baseball team at Santa Ana High School for the third year in a row in...
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | February 5, 2003
A visionary knows how it is to be misunderstood - just ask the guys who created the original TV dinner. They put the peas on the left, mashed potatoes on the right, meat front and center where it belongs. It could hardly have been simpler, yet it appears the TV dinner was misconstrued. "The idea wasn't that you sit and watch TV and eat this thing," says Gerry Thomas, who says he hatched the TV dinner while working in sales for C.A. Swanson & Sons in Omaha, Neb., a food wholesaler that put the product into national distribution in 1953.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | July 28, 2001
As early morning sun bathes the sidewalks in Charles Village, it seems a perfect day to chill out, to contemplate life or, perhaps, to protest the sale of veal. Kerron Ramnath is already sitting in his green plastic chair outside Eddie's Market on St. Paul Street. For several days he has been collecting signatures he hopes will lead the store to stop offering veal. Which, in turn, will end the cruel treatment of veal calves. The poster on his backpack reads "Say No To Veal." Photos of caged, miserable creatures stare reproachfully at cheerful passers-by.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 20, 2000
NEW YORK -- Boasting to the audience that he's "One-Take Bushie," the Texas governor begins a skit about his tendency to mispronounce words. Yet somehow he can't mangle them on cue. So the director has to repeatedly reshoot the scene. The vice president has an easier part in their joint spoof -- sighing disdainfully at George W. Bush from the sidelines. Yet true to his controlling nature, Al Gore brings a speechwriter along to the taping and tries to edit the script. Live from New York: It's life imitating art imitating life as the presidential contenders poked fun at themselves yesterday in a bid to win votes among the millions of Americans who watch Saturday night's favorite comedy but are otherwise tuned out of the presidential race.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,Staff Writer | January 2, 1993
MINNEAPOLIS -- The home team has changed quarterbacks three times in the past five weeks, has scored more than 17 points only twice in the past seven games, and doesn't have a wide receiver who has caught a pass in a month.The visiting team has lost its last two games and four of the last seven, has 11 players on the injury list and has the lowest rated quarterback in the NFC.Welcome to today's playoff game between the Washington Redskins and the Minnesota Vikings -- a testament to the NFL's never-ending quest for more television money.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 20, 2000
NEW YORK -- Boasting to the audience that he's "One-Take Bushie," the Texas governor begins a skit about his tendency to mispronounce words. Yet somehow he can't mangle them on cue. So the director has to repeatedly reshoot the scene. The vice president has an easier part in their joint spoof -- sighing disdainfully at George W. Bush from the sidelines. Yet true to his controlling nature, Al Gore brings a speechwriter along to the taping and tries to edit the script. Live from New York: It's life imitating art imitating life as the presidential contenders poked fun at themselves yesterday in a bid to win votes among the millions of Americans who watch Saturday night's favorite comedy but are otherwise tuned out of the presidential race.
ENTERTAINMENT
By [SAM SESSA] | November 30, 2006
Film and chili The lowdown -- Wednesday, a group of student filmmakers from Reservoir Hill will screen animations, documentaries and public service announcements at the Creative Alliance at the Patterson. Several kinds of chili will be served during the screenings, which tackle issues of stereotyping, power and attitude. The event, called Kids on the Hill TV Dinner, is a fundraiser for community art organization Kids on the Hill. If you go -- Creative Alliance is at 3134 Eastern Ave. 8 p.m. Tickets are $15 for adults and free for kids accompanied by adults.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal and Ken Rosenthal,Evening Sun Staff | October 3, 1990
At 10:01 p.m. Toronto's 2-1 victory over the Orioles wa complete. The Blue Jays retreated to their clubhouse, turned on the TV and held their breath. It was nearly 90 minutes before they were free to exhale, nearly 90 minutes of excruciating, exquisite baseball drama.The entire season flashed before their eyes, but the Blue Jaylived to see another day. Boston's 3-2 loss to Chicago in 11 innings left them one game back with one to play. There will be a one-game playoff tomorrow in Toronto if they somehow tie the Red Sox tonight.
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