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BUSINESS
January 7, 2010
Men's apparel store Jos. A. Bank Clothiers said Wednesday it is expanding into the tuxedo rental business. The Hampstead-based retailer will try the concept in 5 percent of its stores this month and, if successful, roll it out to more than half of stores in the spring. The company, which already sells tuxedos, said it was responding to customer demand. It has partnered with a national distributor that will own the inventory and deliver tuxedos to stores, reducing the risk and investment with starting the venture, the company said in a statement.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
The Men's Wearhouse plans to end the contract that supplies tuxedo rental inventory to Hampstead-based subsidiary Jos. A. Bank, the Houston-based men's retailer said Wednesday. Men's Wearhouse, which acquired Bank in June for $1.8 billion, said an early termination agreement between Bank and Illinois-based tuxedo wholesaler Jim's Formal Wear will take effect Dec. 31. The menswear chain will take a one-time charge of $4.5 million in its fiscal third quarter as a result. "As of January 1, 2015 we will be leveraging our internal tuxedo rental inventory and logistics to serve the Jos. A. Bank tuxedo operations," Men's Wearhouse president and CEO Doug Ewert said in the announcement.
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BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker | andrea.walker@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | April 1, 2010
Men's clothier Jos. A. Bank said Thursday that it will expand its line for portly and tall men and roll out to all of its stores a pilot tuxedo rental program it started last year. The retailer also told analysts to expect an announcement about outlet stores in the next few weeks, leaving open the probability that it will open more of the lower-priced stores this year. The announcements were made during a Thursday morning earnings conference call with analysts. The retailer is trying to look for new growth opportunities as consumers continue to spend cautiously because of the economy.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2011
Robert Lee "Bob" Bell, who began his career in auto sales in the 1950s and went on to own the Bob Bell Automotive Group, one of the state's largest car dealers, died Sunday of leukemia at theUniversity of Maryland Medical Center. The Ellicott City resident, who earlier had lived in Laurel, was 78. Born and raised in Alexandria, Va., Mr. Bell was appointed a Capitol Hill U.S. Senate page and graduated from the Senate Page School. "He was a page for Speaker of the House Sam Rayburn," said a daughter, Mary Catherine Bishop of Ellicott City.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,SUN STAFF | September 16, 1990
WESTMINSTER - Former Westminster city councilman and president David S. Babylon Jr. remembers going in a tuxedo to finalize a sewer project."We were doing a sewer line and were having trouble getting the right of way from this party, so the man called up one day and said we (the committee) could meet him at 5:30 or 6 in the evening," Babylon said."We all had a formal ball to go to that night, but we all met him in our tuxedos and he signed the contract right then and there. That's when he could meet us, so that's when we went."
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Sun Staff Writer | May 30, 1995
A high school kid in white socks steps out of the dressing room and looks down at the black jacket sleeves, shaking his arms. He seems confused. Whose clothes are these anyway?He walked in wearing his own clothes: baggy blue jeans, white T-shirt, white sneakers. Next thing he's standing at the three-sided mirror peering at a trio of guys with whom he is vaguely acquainted, all wearing this black costume. Joseph Marshall meet Joseph Marshall -- he's the tall, blond crew cut standing on the right, the center and the left.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | December 17, 2008
Betty Davidov, who became a well-known Roland Park figure during her nearly seven-decade career working at Tuxedo Pharmacy, died Sunday of complications from a stroke at Gilchrist Hospice Care. She was 97. Betty Tskases was born in Ukraine. With the coming of the Russian Revolution, she immigrated with her family to Baltimore in 1918, where relatives had settled. She was raised on Pulaski Street in West Baltimore, where her father established a wholesale confection and tobacco business.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | May 9, 2005
Blane Smith arrived in gray sweat pants, an orange T-shirt, sneakers and his high school golf team hat. He emerged from the dressing room nearly transformed, wearing a traditional black tuxedo, a black necktie and matching vest - and his Mount St. Joseph's cap. "The hat has got to go," his mother, Brenda Smith, said. "I can't wear it?" the 17-year-old asked with a mischievous grin. "No way," she responded. "You're not wearing it." Blane was one of about five dozen high school boys to cycle through the tiny dressing rooms with the flatteringly tinted mirrors at Cy's of Catonsville one busy afternoon last week.
NEWS
May 27, 2007
Harvey Weinstein, 82 Tuxedo company executive Harvey Weinstein, a former tuxedo company executive who was buried alive for 12 days after being kidnapped in 1993, died May 13 in Manhattan after a lengthy illness. He was 82. Known as the "tuxedo king," Weinstein was CEO of Lord West, a company that manufactured formal wear. Weinstein retired in 1999. The abduction occurred Aug. 4, 1993. Fermin Rodriguez, a collar maker at Weinstein's company, and two accomplices, kidnapped Weinstein and buried him in a pit near the Hudson River.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | May 10, 2003
THE SCREEN door panel emerged from winter storage in sorry shape. There was a tear running along the bottom edge, an opening that the backyard mosquitoes - those pesky Asian tigers - would be certain to exploit. So I measured the height and width of the panel, bought a piece of new screen that was several inches longer and wider than my measurements, and went to work in the back yard. It was pleasant duty. It was a glorious spring afternoon. I set up operations on a table underneath the blooming dogwood tree, its bright pink blossoms lighting up the landscape.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2011
John F. Ercole Sr., a retired Internal Revenue Service agent, died Wednesday of complications from dementia at Bonnie Blink, the Maryland Masonic Home in Hunt Valley. He was 86. The son of bar owners, Mr. Ercole was born in Baltimore and raised in Highlandtown. He was a graduate of Patterson High School. During World War II, he served with an Army infantry unit in Europe. After being discharged from the Army, he returned to Baltimore and went to work for the IRS in 1949.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker | andrea.walker@baltsun.com | April 2, 2010
Expanding waistlines might not be good for the nation's health, but it could mean a new revenue stream for men's clothier Jos. A. Bank. The Hampstead retail chain is bringing its line of clothing for "portly" and tall men to more of its stores and expanding its product line for online sales. The company, which for several years has offered a limited selection of items for the big-and-tall set, such as longer neckties and larger-size dress shirts, said that population is one that has been underserved.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker | andrea.walker@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | April 1, 2010
Men's clothier Jos. A. Bank said Thursday that it will expand its line for portly and tall men and roll out to all of its stores a pilot tuxedo rental program it started last year. The retailer also told analysts to expect an announcement about outlet stores in the next few weeks, leaving open the probability that it will open more of the lower-priced stores this year. The announcements were made during a Thursday morning earnings conference call with analysts. The retailer is trying to look for new growth opportunities as consumers continue to spend cautiously because of the economy.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop | tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | March 6, 2010
A Baltimore man convicted of raping a 59-year-old woman at gunpoint in 2007 in her Tuxedo Park home, a crime that terrorized the community, was sentenced Friday to life plus 93 years in prison. "The only appropriate sentence is life," said Baltimore Circuit Judge John A. Howard, who quoted from the opening of the "Law & Order" television series about sexual crimes being "especially heinous." "If there's a case that demonstrates the truth of that statement," he said, "it is this case."
BUSINESS
January 7, 2010
Men's apparel store Jos. A. Bank Clothiers said Wednesday it is expanding into the tuxedo rental business. The Hampstead-based retailer will try the concept in 5 percent of its stores this month and, if successful, roll it out to more than half of stores in the spring. The company, which already sells tuxedos, said it was responding to customer demand. It has partnered with a national distributor that will own the inventory and deliver tuxedos to stores, reducing the risk and investment with starting the venture, the company said in a statement.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | December 16, 2009
More than two years after prosecutors charged the wrong person in the rape of a Tuxedo Park grandmother, another man, identified through DNA, has been found guilty of the crime. A Baltimore jury convicted Roger L. Ervin, 48, on nine counts Tuesday, including first-degree rape, third-degree sex offense, two counts of first-degree assault, armed robbery and first-degree burglary. He faces a maximum of life in prison, plus 118 years, at his sentencing Feb. 12. It took about an hour for jurors to reach a verdict after three days of testimony, the Baltimore state's attorney's office said.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,Sun Staff | December 26, 1999
Giving your old tuxedo a lift Make a resolution to give your traditional black tuxedo, white shirt and black bow tie a lift this New Year's Eve with these millennial extras from J.S. Edwards Ltd. in the Festival at Woodholme: A gray, wing-tip collar tuxedo shirt patterned with champagne flutes from Ike Behar. Also available in white. $157.50. Understated but elegant neckties from Stefano Milano that feature the number 2000 either striped down the center of a navy tie, or patterned all over, gray on black.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | May 8, 1993
The Harvey House restaurant, a Charles Street stalwart named for a 7-foot-tall invisible rabbit in a Broadway play, has apparently taken its final curtain call.Barry Baumel, son of one of the original founders, said yesterday that the 41-year-old restaurant served its final meals last Saturday and would reopen in several months under new, local ownership.Mr. Baumel said he was prohibited under the terms of the sales contract from disclosing the new owner's identity and that he does not know whether the restaurant would keep the Harvey House name after renovations are complete.
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