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By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to The Evening Sun | October 18, 1990
The four artists being given solo shows in the intimate Tuttle Gallery of McDonogh School literally and in stylistic terms come from different places. Although their work is not meant to hang together as a thematic whole, this is a somewhat frustrating installation in that it often suggests thematic parallels that are then not followed through.Certainly the most striking of the quartet because of the intensity of his coloration and the clarity of his presentation is San Diego painter Ernest Silva.
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NEWS
June 25, 2006
On Thursday, May 25, 2006, at his home, FRANK C. TUTTLE, age 75, of Naples, FL. Mr. Tuttle had lived in Joppa, MD before moving to Naples in 1997. He was born in L'Anse, MI on September 6, 1930. He graduated from L'Anse High School. After graduation Frank and his buddy Vern Brown joined the army. After his service he worked at many sales jobs, Frank was transferred to Baltimore by the CNA Insurance Co. He ultimately founded along with his partner Mickey Darrell, Association Insureres Agency, Inc., in Baltimore, MD. Frank worked in the insurance industry for over 40 years, was a member of Apiga and a founding member of Pima, both professional insurance marketing associations.
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NEWS
July 20, 2003
On Sunday, July 13, 2003 DOROTHY H. WHITE; beloved wife and mother of her deceased husband William B. White and her son Stephen J. White; cherished and highly regarded by her survivors, daughter and son-in-law Sally and Baldwin Tuttle; grandsons and their wives, John and Susan Tuttle and David and Melissa Tuttle; great-grandchildren Lacey, Haley and Dylan Tuttle; her sister and her husband, Jane and Ralph Simmers; her brother Robert Horst; sister-in-law, Catherine...
NEWS
July 20, 2003
On Sunday, July 13, 2003 DOROTHY H. WHITE; beloved wife and mother of her deceased husband William B. White and her son Stephen J. White; cherished and highly regarded by her survivors, daughter and son-in-law Sally and Baldwin Tuttle; grandsons and their wives, John and Susan Tuttle and David and Melissa Tuttle; great-grandchildren Lacey, Haley and Dylan Tuttle; her sister and her husband, Jane and Ralph Simmers; her brother Robert Horst; sister-in-law, Catherine...
NEWS
March 15, 1991
Mary E. TuttleCentreville nativeA memorial service for Mary Elizabeth Tuttle, who taught as a young woman and was active in the Centreville community, will be held at 11 a.m. today at St. Paul's Episcopal Church in Centreville.Mrs. Tuttle, who was 93 and a Centreville resident, died of heart failure Tuesday at the William Hill Manor Health Care Center in Easton.A Centreville native, the former Mary Elizabeth Bishop graduated from Centreville High School and what is now Towson State University.
NEWS
By Ray Jenkins | July 4, 1996
WHEN ELBERT Tuttle arrived in Atlanta in the 1920s to begin his legal career, his neighbors no doubt speculated in whispered tones that he must be one of those "Reconstruction Republicans" who had come to meddle in the affairs of the South. Little did they -- or he himself, for that matter -- know just how right they were.Elbert Parr Tuttle, who died 10 days ago, sound of mind to the very end of his 98 years, exemplified that vanishing species known as "the Eisenhower judge" -- the federal magistrates who assumed the thankless task of reshaping the social landscape of the South for all time.
NEWS
December 18, 2002
Zal Yanovsky, 57, whose distinctive guitar playing and ebullient personality helped make the Lovin' Spoonful one of the most popular rock groups of the late 1960s, died of a heart attack Friday at his home outside Kingston, Ontario. One of the biggest North American rock bands when the Beatles and other British acts dominated the pop charts, Lovin' Spoonful had 10 singles in the Billboard Top 40 between 1965 and 1967. Their first seven -- beginning with "Do You Believe in Magic?" -- all reached the Top 10, and "Summer in the City" reached No. 1 in 1966.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | June 4, 1998
Building windows march along in regular order everywhere, but do they march this elegantly anywhere but in Paris?Their fine proportions and their lovely balconies make this the place one wants to live - but with a lot better furniture than one has now, most likely. The photograph, called "Les Fenetres" (The Windows) is by Guy L. Loraine, who's sharing a two-person show with photographer Richard M. Caplan at the Tuttle Gallery of McDonogh School. Loraine's "Views of Paris" concentrates on the quiet places of Paris, and Caplan in his "Photography by Design" concentrates on making the objects he photographs into strong design statements.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | April 4, 1996
"Reflections" provides a good title for a show of watercolors, because the transparent nature of watercolor makes it a good medium for depicting light and the way objects reflect it.The show, at McDonogh's Tuttle Gallery, contains the work of two artists. Joan Bevelaqua's works, according to her artist's statement, are often light and shadow studies. Andrea Huppert enjoys exploring the interplay of realism and abstraction, and her "Herd Again and Again," shown here, uses zebras to create black and white patterns that can become abstract.
SPORTS
November 1, 1992
Ring 93 of the National Veterans Boxing Association has joined with Ring 101 of Maryland to be co-hosts of the Hall of Fame Awards banquet at Martin's West on Nov. 29.Among the honorees will be heavyweight George Chaplin and lightweight Bobby Lee in the professional category and Richard Agro, Millard Pack and Bill Tuttle for their amateur ring achievements.Trainer Truman Tuttle will be honored for his lifetime contribution to boxing. Four current fighters -- United States Boxing Association junior middleweight champion Vincent Pettway, lightweight contender Sharmba Mitchell, middleweight Les Johnson and welterweight Eddie Van Kirk -- will receive special awards.
NEWS
December 18, 2002
Zal Yanovsky, 57, whose distinctive guitar playing and ebullient personality helped make the Lovin' Spoonful one of the most popular rock groups of the late 1960s, died of a heart attack Friday at his home outside Kingston, Ontario. One of the biggest North American rock bands when the Beatles and other British acts dominated the pop charts, Lovin' Spoonful had 10 singles in the Billboard Top 40 between 1965 and 1967. Their first seven -- beginning with "Do You Believe in Magic?" -- all reached the Top 10, and "Summer in the City" reached No. 1 in 1966.
NEWS
April 8, 2002
John Thomas, 71, a Baltimore native once described by his friend, noted writer Charles Bukowski, as "the best unread poet in America," died of congestive heart failure March 29 at the Veterans Affairs hospital in West Los Angeles, according to his wife, Philomene Long. Born John Thomas Idlet, he grew up in Baltimore, attended Loyola College and briefly considered joining the priesthood. During the Korean War, he was a cryptographer with the Air Force. He returned home after his 1953 discharge, married the first of four wives and became a computer programmer for Univac.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | June 4, 1998
Building windows march along in regular order everywhere, but do they march this elegantly anywhere but in Paris?Their fine proportions and their lovely balconies make this the place one wants to live - but with a lot better furniture than one has now, most likely. The photograph, called "Les Fenetres" (The Windows) is by Guy L. Loraine, who's sharing a two-person show with photographer Richard M. Caplan at the Tuttle Gallery of McDonogh School. Loraine's "Views of Paris" concentrates on the quiet places of Paris, and Caplan in his "Photography by Design" concentrates on making the objects he photographs into strong design statements.
NEWS
By Ray Jenkins | July 4, 1996
WHEN ELBERT Tuttle arrived in Atlanta in the 1920s to begin his legal career, his neighbors no doubt speculated in whispered tones that he must be one of those "Reconstruction Republicans" who had come to meddle in the affairs of the South. Little did they -- or he himself, for that matter -- know just how right they were.Elbert Parr Tuttle, who died 10 days ago, sound of mind to the very end of his 98 years, exemplified that vanishing species known as "the Eisenhower judge" -- the federal magistrates who assumed the thankless task of reshaping the social landscape of the South for all time.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | April 4, 1996
"Reflections" provides a good title for a show of watercolors, because the transparent nature of watercolor makes it a good medium for depicting light and the way objects reflect it.The show, at McDonogh's Tuttle Gallery, contains the work of two artists. Joan Bevelaqua's works, according to her artist's statement, are often light and shadow studies. Andrea Huppert enjoys exploring the interplay of realism and abstraction, and her "Herd Again and Again," shown here, uses zebras to create black and white patterns that can become abstract.
FEATURES
By Susan Campbell and Susan Campbell,Hartford Courant | February 8, 1994
Not long ago, Beverly Tuttle, president and CEO of Consumer Credit Counseling of Connecticut, held an all-day training meeting for her staff.This could have been a deadly boring and fruitless exercise, but Ms. Tuttle, girl boss, loaded the staff onto a bus -- where they watched movies -- and visited company branches that nobody had seen."
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord | January 9, 1992
Smart Alec, one of the winningest horses in Maryland, also is one of the unluckiest.The Maryland Million winner turned up with a trace of cocaine in his system after a winning race in June, and was disqualified. It has never been determined exactly how he ingested the drug, but it is believed he ate cocaine-tainted straw.Then, yesterday, the Maryland Racing Commission upheld the stewards' decision to disqualify him from the Challedon Handicap, after he fouled a horse that didn't place.Steward Bill Passmore said that during his 36-year career as a jockey, he never claimed foul against a winner if his mount hadn't earned a piece of the purse.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Sun Staff Writer | February 1, 1994
Howard County native James Macgill is most widely recognized as "Your Honor" -- a man with the gavel seated on the bench, presiding over his Howard Circuit courtroom in his judge's robe.But the former chief judge of Maryland's 5th Circuit Court, who died last year of cancer at 80, also spent a great deal of time in knock-around work clothes, kneeling with chisel and mallet in hand in his rustic, garage-like workshop pursuing another passion -- stone and wood sculptures.The Foundry Street Gallery in the Owen Brown Shopping Center is presenting a commemorative exhibit of Judge Macgill's wood carvings and stone sculptures, representing 35 years of his work.
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