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NEWS
January 30, 1996
THE TUTSI ARMY of Burundi, bedeviled by Hutu guerrilla attacks, takes its frustrations out on the Hutu majority. There have been thousands of deaths reported, and tragic treks of people from their homes to camps inside the country and, if they can make it, out.Burundi escaped the genocide of its neighbor, Rwanda, in 1994, when Hutu regime propaganda and militia brought about the slaughter of all Tutsi who could be caught, only to fall to the purposeful campaign...
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NEWS
February 15, 2009
ALISON DES FORGES, 66 Scholar chronicled Rwanda's genocide Alison Des Forges, a human rights activist who drew the world's attention to the killings of hundreds of thousands of innocent people in Rwanda in the 1990s and chronicled the massacre, died Feb. 12 in the crash of a Continental Airlines passenger plane in Clarence Center, N.Y., near Buffalo. After April 6, 1994, when an airplane carrying Rwandan President Juvenal Habyarimana was shot down, members of the politically dominant Hutu group suddenly began to attack the Tutsi minority in an uncontrolled rampage of violence.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 16, 1996
GISENYI, Rwanda -- Refugees from eastern Zaire say Hutu supremacists who were pushed out of Rwanda in 1994 have been sowing hatred among Zairian Hutu, encouraging them to attack their Tutsi neighbors.People fleeing Zaire say Hutu gangs trained by Hutu Rwandan militia members have attacked thousands of Zairian Tutsi over the last six months.The attacks have prompted at least 24,000 people to flee into Rwanda and pushed another 65,000 out of their homes and farms inside Zaire.The attacks on Tutsi in Zaire are one of several signs that the Hutu militias have used United Nations refugee camps in eastern Zaire as bases for rebuilding their strength since they were forced to flee Rwanda two years ago, just ahead of a rebel army under Tutsi command.
NEWS
February 7, 2006
Council paves way for 27-condo building The Baltimore County Council agreed last night to add a vacant lot to a cluster of Towson properties that can exceed county regulations on building height and the amount of space around a building. The unanimous council vote will allow property owner Louis Manzo to move forward with plans for a 27-unit condominium complex on less than an acre at 706 Washington Ave. Councilman Vincent J. Gardina, a Perry Hall-Towson Democrat who proposed the bill, said the building, if approved by the county, would help Towson businesses by adding "foot traffic" to the area near Towson Circle.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Sun Staff Writer | April 15, 1994
During the past week of bloodshed and chaos in her native Rwanda, Nathalie Piraino, 37, has sat in her Carney home, garnering scraps of horrifying news.Breaking through on jammed telephone lines a handful of times, she has been told that one of her sisters has already been slaughtered along with her 10 children. She reached another sister, hiding in the capital, Kigali, terrified that the same fate awaited her."Every minute, she told me, they expect to be killed," Mrs. Piraino said last night, her words punctuated by sobs.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and James Bock and Mark Matthews and James Bock,Sun Staff Correspondents | May 8, 1994
KIVUMU REFUGEE CAMP, Burundi -- The mob ran Venerande Bakashema down like the most helpless prey. Eight and a half months pregnant, she had no chance. Then they slaughtered her.Francois Sekayuku, 32, a Tutsi farmer in mud-spattered trousers, numbly told the story of his wife's death. He sat under blue plastic sheeting at this camp in north-central Burundi.From his family's hilly farm in southern Rwanda, Mr. Sekayuku said, he saw spear-carrying Hutu militiamen draw near, followed by soldiers.
NEWS
April 10, 1994
Rwanda and Burundi are both plagued by endemic strife between the upper-class Tutsi minority and under-class Hutu majority. But whoever assassinated the Hutu presidents of Rwanda and Burundi, the chaos afterward was driven by Hutu hardliner attacks against Hutu moderates. Other targets were Tutsi, aid workers, priests and 2,115 lightly armed U.N. troops from 23 countries.Two of Africa's smallest and most densely populated countries, Rwanda and Burundi were Belgian mandates after World War I until independence in 1962.
NEWS
October 31, 1993
So far, television of the West has not caught the agony of Burundi as it has that of Somalia and Bosnia. If it had, the problem would be on the front burner in Washington, instead of on none.The request of United Nations undersecretary James Jonah for only 100 peace-keepers -- for whatever they could do -- is not certain of being heeded by the over-extended U.N. The prime ministers of neighboring Rwanda, Tanzania and Zaire, deluged by some 600,000 refugees they cannot handle, have asked Organization of African Unity sanction for African intervention.
NEWS
By Chrysologue Gakuba | April 21, 1996
TWO YEARS AGO, on April 6, 1994, the Falcon 50 executive jet, a gift from President Francois Mitterrand of France, was downed with the presidents of Rwanda and Burundi aboard. Neither survived. They had just left a conference in Tanzania. Almost immediately the massacres of unarmed civilians, most of them Tutsi, began in Rwanda. When the carnage ended, more than 1 million people had been killed.Two years after this tragic event, we must re-examine it and see what we have learned.Gerard Prunier, a French researcher on East Africa and author of "The Rwanda Crisis, History of a Genocide," writes:"Understanding why they died is the best and most fitting memorial we can raise for the victims.
NEWS
November 2, 1996
THREE GREAT DANGERS from the warfare in eastern Zaire compel the attention of the world. The first is humanitarian. More than 1 million Rwandan Hutu refugees are being driven from camps to face disease, starvation and execution. That would amount to revenge for the genocidal fury they vented on Tutsi neighbors in Rwanda, killing some half-million, in 1994.The second danger is disintegration of Zaire, the former Belgian Congo, a vast country of 40 million people and untold wealth. Its U.S.-backed dictator of three decades, President Mobutu Sese Seku, is a sick old man in Switzerland.
NEWS
By Michael Hoffman and Michael Hoffman,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2005
Yves Twagirayezu stood next to his 17-year-old brother and watched the Hutu soldiers behead him and throw him into a 30-foot-deep mass grave. The 11-year-old Tutsi boy knew he was next. He squirmed from the clutches of a Hutu soldier to jump in after his brother, followed by two other Tutsi boys standing at the rim of the pit. The Hutu soldiers, ordered not to waste bullets on the young prisoners, shoveled on dirt and rocks, figuring they would bury the boys alive. "I got scared and broke loose," Twagirayezu said.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 14, 2005
It's not who you know or what you know or even how you use it, but whether you're willing to test it in a matter of life or death. That's the ultimate challenge for most people, yet the daily challenge for the hero of Hotel Rwanda, Terry George's enraging and enthralling fact-based movie about the Rwandan genocide of 1994. Paul Rusesabagina (Don Cheadle), who manages a four-star Kigali hotel, understands everyone and everything about his country except its capacity for evil. When he can't escape that evil he combats it with rationality.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 14, 2005
Writer-director Terry George, in Washington this past November to promote Hotel Rwanda, confessed that when he read co-writer Keir Pearson's initial script, he felt that the politics threatened to overwhelm the personal story. And how could they not? On April 6, 1994, the downing of Rwandan President Juvenal Habyarimana's plane on its approach to Kigali Airport triggered a genocide of unprecedented swiftness. Habyarimana was a Hutu, and the ruling, majority Hutu tribe blamed the Tutsis - even though the president had just agreed to share power with them.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 4, 2003
ARUSHA, Tanzania - In the first case of its kind since the Nuremberg war crimes trials after World War II, an international court here convicted three Rwandans yesterday of genocide. The trio used a newspaper and a radio station to incite machete-wielding gangs that slaughtered about 800,000 Rwandans, mostly of the Tutsi minority, over several months in 1994. A three-judge panel said the media executives had used a radio station and a twice-monthly newspaper to mobilize Rwanda's Hutu majority against the Tutsis, who were massacred at churches, schools, hospitals and roadblocks.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 20, 2003
NAIROBI, Kenya - A United Nations war crimes tribunal convicted a Rwandan pastor yesterday who fled to Texas and his son of genocide for orchestrating the 1994 slaughter of hundreds of ethnic Tutsis who had sought refuge in the minister's church compound. The Rev. Elizaphan Ntakirutimana, 78, former pastor of a Seventh-day Adventist complex, is the first church leader that the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda has convicted. The judicial body was created in 1994 to try those suspected of ordering extremist ethnic Hutu militias to massacre 800,000 ethnic Tutsis and Hutus who refused to go along with the extremists.
NEWS
By Carter Dougherty and Carter Dougherty,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 13, 2003
MARABA, Rwanda - Cultivating coffee challenges the body everywhere in the world, but in Maraba, it also challenges the soul. To care for her 500 coffee bushes, Marcella Mukamazimpaka walks a road that is barely passable by four-wheel-drive vehicles and trudges up a steep slope nearly a mile to reach a small plantation clinging to the side of one of the rolling hills in southern Rwanda. Mukamazimpaka, 56, cultivated coffee with her husband and three children before the majority Hutu ethnic group killed more than 800,000 Tutsis and moderate Hutus in 1994.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 1, 2001
NAIROBI, Kenya - Beset by eight years of ethnic violence, Burundians attempt to write a new chapter in their bloody history today by ushering in a government that will eventually transfer power to the Hutu majority. During the past week, 700 South African soldiers have massed in Bujumbura, the capital of this central African nation, to protect about 150 political exiles returning to participate in a three-year transition to democracy. Former South African President Nelson Mandela brokered an agreement on the transitional government, and he will be joined by several other African leaders today in launching it. Current President Pierre Buyoya, an ethnic Tutsi, will serve as Burundi's leader for the next 18 months.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | July 14, 1994
France's gamble that it could intervene usefully in Rwanda without provoking the bloody fiasco that overtook the U.N. and American interventions in Somalia has succeeded. The allied and African governments that opposed or denigrated the French undertaking owe Paris an apology. They also owe those helped by France a new effort, right now, to see that a sequel to the Rwandan tragedy does not follow in neighboring Burundi.Despite the professionalism and knowledge of the terrain the French have displayed, they began with a serious misapprehension that had to be corrected after forces already were committed.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 1, 2001
NAIROBI, Kenya - Beset by eight years of ethnic violence, Burundians attempt to write a new chapter in their bloody history today by ushering in a government that will eventually transfer power to the Hutu majority. During the past week, 700 South African soldiers have massed in Bujumbura, the capital of this central African nation, to protect about 150 political exiles returning to participate in a three-year transition to democracy. Former South African President Nelson Mandela brokered an agreement on the transitional government, and he will be joined by several other African leaders today in launching it. Current President Pierre Buyoya, an ethnic Tutsi, will serve as Burundi's leader for the next 18 months.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 6, 2001
BRUSSELS, Belgium - Sister Gertrude, once a mother superior, has been in court for seven weeks, listening to grim details about murder in the convent. She has barely moved except to bow her head, which is covered with the brown veil of the Benedictine order. Sister Gertrude is a Hutu from Rwanda, one of the four accused in a highly unusual trial in Belgium. She is here to answer charges that she collaborated with the killers during the Rwandan genocide in 1994. Among her accusers are fellow nuns, blaming her for the deaths of more than 20 of their family members who were safely hidden in the convent until she summoned police.
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