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NEWS
February 14, 2010
A-OK (Assisting Our Kids) Mentoring-Tutoring Program needs adult volunteers to work in Howard County schools, grades K-8, and after-school programs. A-OK is working with the following schools: Oakland Mills Middle School, Bryant Woods, Longfellow, Phelps Luck, Running Brook, and Talbott Springs elementary schools. To volunteer and for more information, call Chaya Kaplan at 410-730-6030 or e-mail chayakaplan@verizon.net. div.talkforum #creditfooter { display: none; } div.talkforum .feedItemAuthor { display: none; }
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
Sometimes, they offer help solving math problems, or writing sentences, or forming short paragraphs. Yet often, the adults of A-OK Mentoring-Tutoring of Columbia help Howard County students unlock their potential simply by giving an hour a week of attention. "The focus of our intervention is building a strong, encouraging relationship, where the child feels valued and important. That's the first big step," said Chaya Kaplan, executive director of the volunteer nonprofit, which partners with the school system to enhance students' academic and social development.
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NEWS
July 15, 2001
Area schools and literacy programs seek volunteers. Among them: Francis Scott Key Technology Magnet School, 1425 E. Fort Ave., Baltimore, seeks tutors to work individually with pupils in grades one through three weekdays during school hours starting in September. Contact: Kathy Roseborough, 410-396-1503. Our House Youth Home, 4110 College Ave. Ellicott City, needs tutors for boys ages 16 to 19 in reading, math and writing. Contact: Susan Woods, 410-418-8268. If your school or organization is seeking volunteer reading tutors and would like to be included in this listing, call Sundial at 410-783- 1800 and enter code 6130.
SPORTS
By Tim Schwartz, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2014
Baltimore native Lydell Henry, 36, has been around wrestling his whole life. But everywhere he went, wrestling was disappearing. A 1995 graduate of Dunbar High, Henry placed second in the Maryland Scholastic Association tournament his junior year. He went on to wrestle at Morgan State, but in 1996, the school dropped the program. In 2002, Dunbar also eliminated wrestling. To restore Baltimore as a place where wrestlers can thrive, he and Hermondoz Thompson, also a 1995 Dunbar graduate, co-founded Beat the Streets - Baltimore in 2011.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 26, 2013
Letitia Clark Sexton, a volunteer tutor and former department store designer, died of congestive heart failure Dec. 20 at the Blakehurst Retirement Community in Towson. She was 90 and had lived in Stevenson. Born Letitia Clark in Baltimore and raised at Margaret Meadows in Stevenson, she was the daughter of Juliana Keyser Clark, a Women's Hospital trustee, and Gaylord Lee Clark, a Semmes, Bowen and Semmes attorney. She attended the Calvert School and was a 1938 graduate of Saint Mary's in the Mountains in Littleton, N.H. She earned a degree in art and design at Brooklyn's Pratt Institute.
NEWS
July 29, 2013
In response to your July 23rd article, "State test scores decline significantly," the writers lament the lower student test scores in comparison to last year, particularly in math. Much of the blame is attributed to a change in curriculum to conform to Common Core standards. While I support this transition and believe it is necessary to better educate our students, the article misses a very important point. The impact on many of Maryland's most vulnerable students has been significant.
NEWS
May 31, 2013
Arundel Public Library The library seeks a volunteer, 16 or older, to assist with scanning a large archive of historical photographs and clippings, uploading the images to Flickr and entering any data written on the photos. Accuracy and careful handling of delicate items are important, as is the ability to work independently. All work will take place at library headquarters, 5 Harry S. Truman Parkway in Annapolis. Hours are flexible between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.
NEWS
Erica L. Green | February 6, 2013
Baltimore city government employees are now able to devote up to two work hours per week to helping third-grade students hone their reading skills, the mayor's office announced this month. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake signed the executive order on Feb. 1, according to a release, that would allow full-time employees to volunteer in the Baltimore city school system to provide one-on-one tutoring to students struggling with reading--a cause the mayor has taken up as part of her "Third Grade Reads Initiative.
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