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By sloane brown and sloane brown,sloane@sloanebrown.com | November 23, 2008
Some 350 people packed the Marriott Waterfront hotel's mezzanine for "Wishes, Dreams & Imagination," the sixth-annual fundraising party for Dyslexia Tutoring Program, with almost everyone receiving a personal welcome from the organization's CEO, Marcy K. Kolodny. Sure, there were lots of things to eat and drink and plenty of people to see. But for many guests, the cause was a personal one. "Being dyslexic myself, having worked at this organization when I dropped out of college ... I've been incredibly fortunate that I have had the help and learned to read," said board member David Berg.
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By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
Sometimes, they offer help solving math problems, or writing sentences, or forming short paragraphs. Yet often, the adults of A-OK Mentoring-Tutoring of Columbia help Howard County students unlock their potential simply by giving an hour a week of attention. "The focus of our intervention is building a strong, encouraging relationship, where the child feels valued and important. That's the first big step," said Chaya Kaplan, executive director of the volunteer nonprofit, which partners with the school system to enhance students' academic and social development.
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NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | May 9, 2007
Two years ago, Michael Cunningham's grades were consistently in the 70s. On Saturday, he received an award in math for improving one letter grade or better. The award came from a tutoring program called A Bridge to Academic Excellence. ABAE tutors helped Cunningham raise his Algebra II grade to an 87. In that regard, Cunningham might be considered a typical ABAE tutee. "We bring in students from Baltimore City and Baltimore County and tutor them in subjects they need help in -- mostly math," Michelle Taymuree told me two weeks before Saturday's awards ceremony.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
Deborah Bias began taking adult literacy classes last August, and since then the Annapolis resident has vaulted from a kindergarten reading level to third grade, picking up about a thousand words along the way. Her instruction comes courtesy of an individualized tutoring program from the Anne Arundel County Literacy Council, a nonprofit that has offered one-on-one coaching in reading, writing and spelling since 1977. Bias' instruction often involves words on flashcards that she spreads out over a table, glimpses, memorizes, then writes out. Sometimes, she says, she'll become so immersed in learning new words that if her phone rings, the caller is sure to hear "Leave a message.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2004
Gail M. Parker, former director of the Brown Memorial Tutoring Program that helped disadvantaged inner-city children overcome reading disabilities, died of breast cancer Saturday at Johns Hopkins Hospital. She was 72. Born and raised Gail Munson in New Haven, Conn., she earned a bachelor's degree in English in 1953 from Smith College and a master's in reading in 1987 from what is now Towson University. At her death, Mrs. Parker was studying for a master's degree in humanities at Towson.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Sun Staff Writer | March 21, 1994
When Burleigh Manor Middle School opened next to Centennial High in 1992, no one knew for sure how students from the two schools would interact.But since the start of a tutoring program last fall, the relationship has blossomed."
NEWS
By Jean Leslie and Jean Leslie,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 13, 1995
DEEP RUN Elementary School opens its senior tutoring program with its first tutor, Marcella Faulkner. Ms. Faulkner comes to the school twice a week for a morning one-on-one with several students.New to our area and not a retired teacher, Ms. Faulkner was a bit apprehensive the first day she tutored the children. But she fits into school routines beautifully and is a great asset to the program.Deep Run also has recruited three student volunteers from Howard High School, who will begin tutoring soon.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller | December 30, 1990
Carol F. McIntire won't be staying after class at Oakland Mills Middle School next semester to offer encouragement and help to students in her after-school tutoring program.McIntire, 54, an instructional assistant in special education, is at her Columbia home battling ovarian cancer.But the program she started in 1987 -- Tutorial Opportunity Program for Success -- will continue.Teacher's secretary Marjorie A. Kupiec has taken responsibility for supervising the twice-weekly tutoring program, with the help of reading specialist Deborah Jackson.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,SUN STAFF | December 28, 2004
When Moises Estrada began attending tutoring sessions about 2 1/2 months ago, he knew no English. Now he can tell people his name, where he's from and can ask about their weekend. With the help of Palabras to Words (palabras is Spanish for "words") - a tutoring program started by a group of McDaniel College students this semester - Estrada has learned to carry on basic conversations in English with co-workers at the construction company where he works. "I have to learn English," said Estrada, 26, who moved from Mexico about a year and a half ago. "If I learn English, I will be able to survive better."
NEWS
September 9, 2007
The A-OK (Assisting Our Kids) mentoring/tutoring program, a project of Oakland Mills Interfaith Center, is recruiting and training volunteer mentors and tutors to work in elementary and middle schools with individual children and small groups. Opportunities are available during school hours, after school and in elementary school homework clubs. No specific skills are required; volunteers should be willing to commit to one hour a week during the school year. An orientation for prospective volunteers will be held at 7:30 p.m. Sept.
NEWS
March 15, 2014
For too long, education policy and practice at large have perpetuated two myths: That we must prioritize service and support for struggling learners at the expense of high-performing students and that gifted students don't need much support because they can do just fine on their own. Thankfully, officials at Catonsville Middle School are tearing down these impediments by offering a tutoring program focused on gifted and struggling students (...
SPORTS
By Tim Schwartz, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2014
Baltimore native Lydell Henry, 36, has been around wrestling his whole life. But everywhere he went, wrestling was disappearing. A 1995 graduate of Dunbar High, Henry placed second in the Maryland Scholastic Association tournament his junior year. He went on to wrestle at Morgan State, but in 1996, the school dropped the program. In 2002, Dunbar also eliminated wrestling. To restore Baltimore as a place where wrestlers can thrive, he and Hermondoz Thompson, also a 1995 Dunbar graduate, co-founded Beat the Streets - Baltimore in 2011.
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By Erica L. Green, Liz Bowie and Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2014
- Newly named to head Baltimore's public schools, Gregory E. Thornton has unfinished business in the district he is leaving behind after 31/2 tumultuous years. Wearing a red T-shirt, he arrived Friday at a school where, to peals of laughter, the 59-year-old would join kids in a "jump rope-a-thon. " But, as so frequently happened during his tenure, there were political hoops to jump through first. "How are we doing?" Thornton asked a state senator he spied in the welcoming crowd.
NEWS
March 31, 2012
I am very upset with what I read in your newspaper about the threat to the supplemental educational services tutoring program ("Fund classrooms, not corporations," March 27). I have a daughter who is in the free tutoring program, and no one asked me if this was a good or bad program. It has helped my daughter tremendously. Now interim state superintendent of schools Bernard J. Sadusky wants to take away the one program that Baltimore City children really need. I am outraged and appalled.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2012
State education leaders say proposed legislation that would force local school systems to continue funding a federal tutoring program could derail their efforts to gain relief from the mandates of the No Child Left Behind Act. Lawmakers are debating two bills introduced in the House of Delegates and the Senate dealing with Supplemental Educational Services, a federally mandated program that provides thousands of the state's poorest and lowest-performing students...
NEWS
By Bernard J. Sadusky | March 26, 2012
Maryland should be proud of its educational system. We are home to some of the nation's highest performing schools, and our system ranks at the very top in several national studies and reports. That success is due to everyone - teachers, administrators, parents, and hard-working students. But let's not kid ourselves: Maryland also is home to some chronically underperforming schools. To turn around struggling classrooms, and provide a better future for children, we need options such as extending the school day that would target student learning head on. We should not be forced to fund programs that aren't working.
NEWS
By James Hill and James Hill,Chicago Tribune | January 1, 1992
CHICAGO -- They do more by 8:30 in the morning than many elementary-school children do all day.They are several dozen pupils who get help in a unique before-school tutoring program at Hart Elementary School in North Chicago -- code named HART, for Helping At Risks To Succeed.The formula is simple: Hart provides the youngsters; the nearby Great Lakes Naval Training Center provides the tutors; and Walgreens, the drugstore chain, provides the money for supplies and a breakfast for pupils and tutors after each session.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | February 25, 2001
SILVER SPRING - Second-grader Greg Brower considers himself lucky to have caught the attention of one of the big boys at school. Jose Ruiz is smart, cool - and in fifth grade. They get together twice a week during recess. They talk and tell jokes. But mostly, they read. That's because Jose is more than a friend: He's Greg's reading tutor. Their partnership is the result of an innovative reading initiative in Montgomery County - styled after a similar tutoring program in Israeli schools - that involves parents and fifth-graders who teach slow-reading second-graders to become better readers.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2011
A federally mandated tutoring program targeting thousands of students who attend Baltimore City's worst performing schools is shelling out millions of dollars annually to organizations that are operating in the district with little oversight and virtually no academic accountability measures, according to a report released Tuesday by the Abell Foundation. In the report, titled "Sending out an S.O.S. for the SES (Supplemental Educational Services)," researcher Joan Jacobson - whose complaints against her son's special education tutoring service resulted in the provider facing fraud charges and jail time - found that Baltimore is a burgeoning marketplace for the tutoring companies because it holds the bulk of the state's underperforming schools and low-income populations.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2011
Midshipman First Class Natalie Logan, a chemistry major at the U.S. Naval Academy, tutors students on Saturday mornings in math and science. Mike Elliott began mentoring a fatherless teen boy when he was attending seventh grade at Corkran Middle School in Glen Burnie. The teen's now in 11th grade and Elliott's still there. The Volunteer Center for Anne Arundel County has named Logan and Elliott "Mentors of the Year" for their service, and plans to honor them and several others at its sixth annual awards ceremony this week.
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