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Tuskegee Airmen

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NEWS
By Dave Rosenthal | January 20, 2012
"Red Tails," the years-long project of director George Lucas, is sure to bring some overdue attention to the Tuskegee Airmen, the all-black aviation unit that fought discrimination in the U.S. military as well as our enemies in World War II. Reviews for the movie have not been outstanding, but I'm looking forward to seeing it anyway. (Then again, I've watched "The Longest Day" over and over.)  According to a National Park Service history of the Airmen, before 1940, blacks were barred from flying for the U.S. military.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2014
Alonzo P. Hairston, a retired Baltimore lawyer who was one of the famed Tuskegee Airmen during World War II, died Jan. 30 of a blood clot at ManorCare Health Services in Overland, Kan. The former Original Northwood resident was 94. The son of the Rev. Robert F. Hairston Sr., founder and pastor of Refuge Baptist Church, and Arizona Clayton Hairston, a homemaker, Alonzo Paul Hairston was born and raised in Columbus, Ohio. After graduating in 1938 from East High, he attended Bluefield State College in West Virginia on a boxing scholarship, and later West Virginia State University.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2012
When he was a Tuskegee Airman on an Alabama air base in the 1940s, Cecil O. Byron and other members of the all-black squadron could not shop or dine in the nearby town. They were relegated to the balcony at the movies and could not leave the theater until the white patrons had gone. "We were in uniform, getting ready to fight a war, but still not accepted," Byron, 91, said to an audience of students and teachers at Randallstown High School last week. He has been to the movies five times in recent weeks, each time to see "Red Tails," the Hollywood version of the story of the Army Air Forces group that learned to fly, shoot and maintain aircraft at a field near the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2012
When he was a Tuskegee Airman on an Alabama air base in the 1940s, Cecil O. Byron and other members of the all-black squadron could not shop or dine in the nearby town. They were relegated to the balcony at the movies and could not leave the theater until the white patrons had gone. "We were in uniform, getting ready to fight a war, but still not accepted," Byron, 91, said to an audience of students and teachers at Randallstown High School last week. He has been to the movies five times in recent weeks, each time to see "Red Tails," the Hollywood version of the story of the Army Air Forces group that learned to fly, shoot and maintain aircraft at a field near the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | June 5, 1996
The Maryland Air National Guard will honor World War II's famed Tuskegee Airmen at 3 p.m. Sunday at Martin State Airport, 2701 Eastern Blvd. in Middle River.The Tuskegee Airmen -- members of the all-black 99th and 302nd Squadrons -- compiled a distinguished combat record in more than 1,500 missions over Europe and North Africa.Among veterans of the two squadrons at the tribute will be guest speaker Ira O'Neill, one of the original Tuskegee pilots. O'Neill left the service as a first lieutenant at the war's end. He rejoined later and spent 30 years in the Air Force as a noncommissioned officer before retiring at his officer rank.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | August 26, 1995
HBO has become the symbol for excellence in made-for-television movies. And the premium cable channel delivers another quality drama tonight at 8 in "The Tuskegee Airmen," starring Laurence Fishburne.As a whole, "Tuskegee" is not a great movie. But it is way above average, and it contains scenes that will move you in a way television seldom does.The film, which is based on the real-life experiences of some 440 African-American combat pilots, is about the fighting of two wars by those men. The first is the bloody one the airmen courageously fought in the skies over Europe and northern Africa during World War II. The other one -- the more difficult war, according to the film -- is the one they fought at home to be trained and accepted as men with the right stuff.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | May 16, 2001
For the students in the crowd, it was as if the 11 graying old men had stepped from the pages of history - the last few members of the now-legendary corps of Tuskegee Airmen whose World War II exploits flew in the face of widespread military belief that African-American soldiers could not or should not fly. Yesterday, the men were guests at an Armed Forces Week "Honoring Those Who Serve" luncheon at Fort Meade. More than 400 gathered under a shiny white tent and met some of the nation's first black military pilots.
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | March 30, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The Tuskegee Airmen were called racist and hurtful names as they became the nation's first black military pilots during World War II. Yesterday, they were called heroes. About 300 airmen, widows and relatives sat in the Capitol Rotunda as the Tuskegee Airmen received the Congressional Gold Medal - the nation's highest civilian honor - and a salute from President Bush. The award is recognition of the airmen's role in fighting two wars: one against America's enemies abroad and another against ignorance and racial intolerance at home.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2014
Alonzo P. Hairston, a retired Baltimore lawyer who was one of the famed Tuskegee Airmen during World War II, died Jan. 30 of a blood clot at ManorCare Health Services in Overland, Kan. The former Original Northwood resident was 94. The son of the Rev. Robert F. Hairston Sr., founder and pastor of Refuge Baptist Church, and Arizona Clayton Hairston, a homemaker, Alonzo Paul Hairston was born and raised in Columbus, Ohio. After graduating in 1938 from East High, he attended Bluefield State College in West Virginia on a boxing scholarship, and later West Virginia State University.
NEWS
June 1, 2007
As Memorial Day month comes to a close, we join the nation in offering a very belated salute to William H. Cornish. Mr. Cornish, 87, served in World War II with the 332nd Fighter Group of the Tuskegee Airmen, the first all-black bomber unit. After the war, the Tuskegee Airmen slipped too quietly back into a segregated society. The unit's extraordinary and valiant record put the lie to deeply ingrained racial segregation, so it had to be forgotten. For decades, the Tuskegee Airmen were at most a footnote in the story of World War II for most Americans.
NEWS
By Dave Rosenthal | January 20, 2012
"Red Tails," the years-long project of director George Lucas, is sure to bring some overdue attention to the Tuskegee Airmen, the all-black aviation unit that fought discrimination in the U.S. military as well as our enemies in World War II. Reviews for the movie have not been outstanding, but I'm looking forward to seeing it anyway. (Then again, I've watched "The Longest Day" over and over.)  According to a National Park Service history of the Airmen, before 1940, blacks were barred from flying for the U.S. military.
EXPLORE
By Bob Allen | October 11, 2011
The Collings Foundation, a private organization dedicated to preserving and depicting America's aviation history, is continuing its Wings of Freedom World War II living history program this weekend at Carroll County Regional Airport. As in past years, three of the foundation's vintage WWII-era airplanes — a B-17 Flying Fortress, B-24 Liberator and B-25 Mitchell — are in Westminster for a weekend of tours and flights across Carroll County. The annual World War II-era "Hangar Social" dance will also be held Saturday night, from 6:30 to 9 p.m. The charge for the dance is $10, with free admission for all World War II and Korean War veterans.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | July 5, 2011
Harts Morrison Brown, a retired management consultant who had been a member of the famed Tuskegee Airmen during World War II, died June 24 of lung cancer at the Veteran Administration Rehabilitation and Extended Care Center in Northeast Baltimore. The Woodstock resident, who had lived in Northwest Baltimore and Columbia, was 89. Harts Morrison Brown, the son of a Baltimore & Ohio railroader and a concert pianist, was born and raised in Cincinnati. After graduating in 1940 from Walnut Hills High School in Cincinnati, he moved to Philadelphia to be near his mother.
NEWS
September 20, 2009
ROBERT SEARCY, 88 Member of the Tuskegee Airmen Robert Searcy, a member of the all-black group of World War II servicemen known as the Tuskegee Airmen, died of colon cancer Sept. 7 at his granddaughter's home in Atlanta. He was 88. Searcy was born in Mount Pleasant, Texas, in 1921, and briefly attended what is now Prairie View A&M University before enlisting in the Army Air Corps in 1942. In an interview this year, he said that after basic training at Fort Hood, Texas, he was selected to lead a group of airmen to Tuskegee Army Airfield in Tuskegee, Ala. Searcy described how porters on the train platform that day told him that his men would be segregated, barred from dining and sleeping quarters.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,hanah.cho@baltsun.com | February 15, 2009
Gwendolyn Parrish was studying to become a doctor when she met a Baltimore County police lieutenant who was recruiting candidates in her Turners Station neighborhood. At first, she dismissed the idea. But she eventually became drawn to "a calling to do service for my community and make a difference," Parrish said, noting that the relationship between the historically black neighborhood and police was tense in the 1980s. So Parrish left the University of Maryland, Baltimore County after three years to pursue a law enforcement career.
NEWS
June 1, 2007
As Memorial Day month comes to a close, we join the nation in offering a very belated salute to William H. Cornish. Mr. Cornish, 87, served in World War II with the 332nd Fighter Group of the Tuskegee Airmen, the first all-black bomber unit. After the war, the Tuskegee Airmen slipped too quietly back into a segregated society. The unit's extraordinary and valiant record put the lie to deeply ingrained racial segregation, so it had to be forgotten. For decades, the Tuskegee Airmen were at most a footnote in the story of World War II for most Americans.
NEWS
February 1, 2006
Cyril Byron Sr., 85 (right), who served with the Tuskegee Airmen during World War II, addresses an American government class at Milford Mill Academy. Byron talked yesterday about discrimination he and others faced during the war and afterward. The top photo shows the cap of William Peterson, who worked in aviation logistics. Peterson, who went on to serve with the Marines, also talked to the class.
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