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By Donna St. George and Donna St. George,Knight-Ridder News Service | August 31, 1993
William Mason of Baltimore is suspicious of doctors and medicines and government health programs, even now when he desperately needs them. As he considers why, his reason settles on a name that has lurked in his mind for 15 or 20 years.Tuskegee. In one word, all the proof in the world. It is a word that resonates fearfully in black communities throughout America when critical health-care decisions are made. Often they are life and death decisions.Tuskegee was the rural Alabama town where the government lied to 400 black men who were sick with syphilis.
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HEALTH
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2014
Kimberly Smith believed she was "in good hands" when she rented an East Baltimore rowhouse nearly 20 years ago that was part of a Kennedy Krieger Institute study of lead paint remediation techniques. Kennedy Krieger takes care of children, Smith thought at the time. One of her children had suffered lead poisoning when the family had lived elsewhere, she recalled in a recent interview, and she was pregnant then with her fourth child, Cecil. "I was told it was a great opportunity - it was lead-safe," Smith said.
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 20, 1995
TUSKEGEE, Ala. -- Dr. Henry W. Foster Jr. saved the life of the mayor's infant son. He talked a scared and confused Joyce German out of an abortion. He ran a network of prenatal clinics that persuaded young, poor women to abandon their midwives. And he delivered babies."Oh, the babies," recalled his nurse, Thelma Walker-Brown. "Lots of babies. Babies. Babies. Babies."He was just out of medical school when he came to Tuskegee. Young, ambitious, trained in modern medicine. Among the poor, the uneducated and the sick living on the red clay soil of east-central Alabama, among the women who didn't know or couldn't afford to call a doctor, Dr. Foster was the best they had.This was Alabama in the 1960s, a time and a place unlike the world today, long before the president of the United States would summon Dr. Foster to become the nation's surgeon general.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2014
Alonzo P. Hairston, a retired Baltimore lawyer who was one of the famed Tuskegee Airmen during World War II, died Jan. 30 of a blood clot at ManorCare Health Services in Overland, Kan. The former Original Northwood resident was 94. The son of the Rev. Robert F. Hairston Sr., founder and pastor of Refuge Baptist Church, and Arizona Clayton Hairston, a homemaker, Alonzo Paul Hairston was born and raised in Columbus, Ohio. After graduating in 1938 from East High, he attended Bluefield State College in West Virginia on a boxing scholarship, and later West Virginia State University.
NEWS
June 28, 2008
CHARLES DRYDEN, 87 Pioneering black pilot Lt. Col. Charles "Chuck" Dryden, one of the first of the pioneering black World War II pilots known as the Tuskegee Airmen, died Tuesday in Atlanta of natural causes, said a spokesman for the National Museum of Patriotism in Atlanta. Colonel Dryden was on the museum's board of directors. His 21-year military career included combat missions in Korea and assignments in Japan, Germany and U.S. bases. He retired from the Air Force in 1962. Colonel Dryden was selected for aviation cadet training as part of a segregated Army Air Corps unit at Tuskegee Army Flying School in Alabama in August 1941.
NEWS
May 4, 2002
Faylice H. Spears, a medical monitor technician, died April 27 of cancer at her home in Columbia. She was 65. For the past 25 years, she was a monitor technician at Montgomery General Hospital in Olney, where she worked with intensive-care patients. Born Faylice Henry in Galveston, Texas, she attended Dillard University in New Orleans and Tuskegee Institute in Tuskegee, Ala. She was a member of First Baptist Church of Guilford. Her marriage to Floyd Spears Sr. ended in divorce. She is survived by two sons, Brian K. Spears and Floyd R. Spears, both of Columbia; and four grandchildren.
NEWS
April 18, 1996
Charles Alfred Anderson,89, who taught himself to fly, then trained the Tuskegee Airmen, America's first black military pilots, died Saturday in Tuskegee, Ala.He was considered the father of black aviation. He ran Tuskegee University's pilot training program, an experiment begun before World War II, to disprove the belief that blacks could not learn to fly airplanes.Mr. Anderson said he learned to fly by reading books and getting tips from young white pilots. He scraped together enough money to buy an airplane and got his pilot's license in 1929.
NEWS
May 22, 2006
On May 17, 2006 GOODRICH D. BRAME, JR.; beloved husband of the late Lois S. Brame; devoted father of Goodrich H. Brame and loving brother of Marion Washington, Annie B. Harris. He is also survived by several cousins, nieces, nephews as well as extended family and friends. He was born May 28, 1918 in Townsville, NC. He moved to Henderson, NC in 1926. He graduated High School from Henderson Institute in Henderson, NC and continued his education at St. Paul's College in Lawrenceville, VA. He then graduated from Tuskegee Institute in Tuskegee, AL, where he obtained a Bachelor's degree in Agriculture.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to the Sun | February 23, 2003
Last weekend's snowstorm plowed under several parties. Monday night was to be the first "Eubie Award" night at the Eubie Blake National Jazz Institute and Cultural Center. The award, for excellence in the performing arts, was to be presented to Eric Anthony, the young Baltimore actor appearing in the Broadway musical Hairspray. But Mother Nature pushed things back a bit. Center director Camay Calloway Murphy says the awards dinner will now happen March 17. Eric and John Waters -- you know him, that local guy who made the original flick -- have given their "can do," but Camay says she hasn't heard whether Mayor Martin O'Malley can make the snow date.
NEWS
November 28, 2008
Conversation is as central to Thanksgiving as the turkey crowning the dinner table. But how many of our treasured conversations do we truly remember - and how often have we wished we could hear again a loved one or friend recount a revealing story? Today, Americans are being invited to act on that impulse by recording just such a conversation in what is being promoted as a "National Day of Listening." The sponsors of this event have shown compellingly in recent years how the act of listening can change opinions, improve relations and transform lives.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2012
When he was a Tuskegee Airman on an Alabama air base in the 1940s, Cecil O. Byron and other members of the all-black squadron could not shop or dine in the nearby town. They were relegated to the balcony at the movies and could not leave the theater until the white patrons had gone. "We were in uniform, getting ready to fight a war, but still not accepted," Byron, 91, said to an audience of students and teachers at Randallstown High School last week. He has been to the movies five times in recent weeks, each time to see "Red Tails," the Hollywood version of the story of the Army Air Forces group that learned to fly, shoot and maintain aircraft at a field near the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama.
NEWS
By Dave Rosenthal | January 20, 2012
"Red Tails," the years-long project of director George Lucas, is sure to bring some overdue attention to the Tuskegee Airmen, the all-black aviation unit that fought discrimination in the U.S. military as well as our enemies in World War II. Reviews for the movie have not been outstanding, but I'm looking forward to seeing it anyway. (Then again, I've watched "The Longest Day" over and over.)  According to a National Park Service history of the Airmen, before 1940, blacks were barred from flying for the U.S. military.
NEWS
November 28, 2008
Conversation is as central to Thanksgiving as the turkey crowning the dinner table. But how many of our treasured conversations do we truly remember - and how often have we wished we could hear again a loved one or friend recount a revealing story? Today, Americans are being invited to act on that impulse by recording just such a conversation in what is being promoted as a "National Day of Listening." The sponsors of this event have shown compellingly in recent years how the act of listening can change opinions, improve relations and transform lives.
NEWS
June 28, 2008
CHARLES DRYDEN, 87 Pioneering black pilot Lt. Col. Charles "Chuck" Dryden, one of the first of the pioneering black World War II pilots known as the Tuskegee Airmen, died Tuesday in Atlanta of natural causes, said a spokesman for the National Museum of Patriotism in Atlanta. Colonel Dryden was on the museum's board of directors. His 21-year military career included combat missions in Korea and assignments in Japan, Germany and U.S. bases. He retired from the Air Force in 1962. Colonel Dryden was selected for aviation cadet training as part of a segregated Army Air Corps unit at Tuskegee Army Flying School in Alabama in August 1941.
NEWS
By Michael Schuman and Michael Schuman,Special to The Sun | February 3, 2008
Peanut butter and some of the most courageous fighter pilots of World War II share common roots. So do author Ralph Ellison and the first African-American four-star general. All are products of the only college or university designated a national historic site by Congress: Tuskegee University, originally founded as a school for teachers of color, in Tuskegee, Ala. Today, much of it is operated for visitors as the Tuskegee Institute National Historic Site. Layer upon layer of African-American history can be found here.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and David Kohn and Chris Emery and David Kohn,Sun reporters | January 15, 2008
Many African-American patients refuse to join medical studies because they fear they will be lied to and harmed by scientists who view them as human guinea pigs, according to a study by Johns Hopkins researchers. Confirming the observations of many researchers, the study might explain why clinical trials of new therapies fail to enroll enough black participants - and why trials might fail to predict how blacks will react to new drugs and medical devices. Incidents such as the Tuskegee study - the infamous 40-year experiment in which researchers withheld treatment from black men with syphilis - have left many blacks wary of doctors and medical research, the Hopkins researchers concluded.
HEALTH
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2014
Kimberly Smith believed she was "in good hands" when she rented an East Baltimore rowhouse nearly 20 years ago that was part of a Kennedy Krieger Institute study of lead paint remediation techniques. Kennedy Krieger takes care of children, Smith thought at the time. One of her children had suffered lead poisoning when the family had lived elsewhere, she recalled in a recent interview, and she was pregnant then with her fourth child, Cecil. "I was told it was a great opportunity - it was lead-safe," Smith said.
NEWS
November 13, 1991
Long before the United Negro College Fund popularized the slogan "a mind is a terrible thing to waste," Tuskegee Institute in Alabama held a unique place in the universe of black higher education. Now this grand old university is experiencing unusually difficult times. Founded in 1891 by Booker T. Washington, the school in recent years has fallen victim to both the vagaries of state education funding and its own substantial growth, which has stretched operating revenues to the limit.Last week Tuskegee President Benjamin F. Payton announced a drive to raise $150 million for the school by the year 2000.
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | March 30, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The Tuskegee Airmen were called racist and hurtful names as they became the nation's first black military pilots during World War II. Yesterday, they were called heroes. About 300 airmen, widows and relatives sat in the Capitol Rotunda as the Tuskegee Airmen received the Congressional Gold Medal - the nation's highest civilian honor - and a salute from President Bush. The award is recognition of the airmen's role in fighting two wars: one against America's enemies abroad and another against ignorance and racial intolerance at home.
NEWS
May 22, 2006
On May 17, 2006 GOODRICH D. BRAME, JR.; beloved husband of the late Lois S. Brame; devoted father of Goodrich H. Brame and loving brother of Marion Washington, Annie B. Harris. He is also survived by several cousins, nieces, nephews as well as extended family and friends. He was born May 28, 1918 in Townsville, NC. He moved to Henderson, NC in 1926. He graduated High School from Henderson Institute in Henderson, NC and continued his education at St. Paul's College in Lawrenceville, VA. He then graduated from Tuskegee Institute in Tuskegee, AL, where he obtained a Bachelor's degree in Agriculture.
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